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posted by Dopefish on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:00AM   Printer-friendly
from the Coffee-or-IcedTea dept.

nobbis writes "Java 8 Early Access Release Candidate Available. Early Access Release Candidate 2 was made available for download last week. Lambda Functions and a new Date Time API are major features of Java 8, with some lesser known performance enhancements, which are discussed by Drew Stephens in his blog Atomic Number Implementation. Oracle's head Java Evangelist Simon Ritter gives a run through of new features in this presentation to the Virtual Java User Group. Project Jigsaw has been delayed again and is now scheduled for release with Java 9."

The bug report looks healthy and Java 8 is due for release on March 17th -- St. Patrick's Day.

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  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:07AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:07AM (#1388)

    Stop writing shit in bloated Java.

    • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 18 2014, @11:20AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 18 2014, @11:20AM (#1531)

      mod parent up

      is there a +5 Troll moderation?

      i don't care if he's a troll... we're all trolls

      java is one of the most repugnant computer viruses out there

    • (Score: 2, Funny) by kef on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:58PM

      by kef (1211) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:58PM (#1604) Homepage

      Never wrote "shit" in java. It's not java syntax...

  • (Score: 5, Funny) by Gaaark on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:14AM

    by Gaaark (41) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:14AM (#1391) Journal

    We should switch the tagline to "Soylent News... it's Leprechauns" for St. Paddy's day.

    --
    --- Please remind me if I haven't been civil to you: I'm channeling MDC. ---Gaaark 2.0 ---
    • (Score: 3, Funny) by everdred on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:35AM

      by everdred (110) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:35AM (#1396) Homepage Journal

      If they turned the site green for the day, who would sue first: Slashdot or MGM?

      • (Score: 5, Funny) by Gaaark on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:42AM

        by Gaaark (41) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:42AM (#1400) Journal

        Ours would be a deeper shade of green: our green would go all the way to eleven, cause we are made of more people. :)

        --
        --- Please remind me if I haven't been civil to you: I'm channeling MDC. ---Gaaark 2.0 ---
        • (Score: 2, Funny) by mrbluze on Tuesday February 18 2014, @05:22AM

          by mrbluze (49) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @05:22AM (#1420) Journal

          There's no truth to the rumor that a bunch of sneaky low UID members are planning to pour a vat of green dye into the soylent on St. Pat's day.

          --
          Do it yourself, 'cause no one else will do it yourself.
          • (Score: 1) by crutchy on Tuesday February 18 2014, @11:34AM

            by crutchy (179) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @11:34AM (#1538) Homepage Journal

            someone could hack a copy of the soylent css and apply it manually with something like the web developer toolbar for firefox... why anyone would want to do that is beyond me, but at least they could... it would be especially geeky :-P

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19 2014, @02:54AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19 2014, @02:54AM (#2109)

          Would that then be #001100? Given what that amounts to, it'd seem we're living on the darker side, as it looks pretty much black to the human eye.

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by biff on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:33AM

    by biff (170) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:33AM (#1395)

    Been using these a lot with jQuery, which pretty much forces them on you, but... ugh. They're the new hotness but they give me the same coding vertigo as recursion, complex regexes, and ten-layer-deep inheritance trees.

    And Perl special variables, PHP code that works across more than four minor releases, ImageMagick code across two, database triggers, and OpenOffice scripting.

    I find myself having to question whether to nest a substantial amount of code because it's only going to be used for one event handler, or break it out to a function and lose the organization of having the code closest to its use. The latter is what ought to be done, but the former becomes tempting to the point that I wonder if this will further beshit the quality of average Java code.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by Desler on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:47AM

      by Desler (880) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:47AM (#1402)

      New? Lambda calculus is nearly 80 years old and anonymous functions, aka "lambdas", have been around over 55 years in Lisp. It's only "new" to people who've never heard of Lisp.

      • (Score: 1) by biff on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:56AM

        by biff (170) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:56AM (#1407)

        I guess I meant "new hotness" as "likely to be seen outside of academia."

        • (Score: 3, Informative) by Desler on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:43PM

          by Desler (880) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:43PM (#1594)

          Not true either. Many langauges have had them for near or over a decade. Java is simply far behind the time.

    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by E_NOENT on Tuesday February 18 2014, @11:18AM

      by E_NOENT (630) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @11:18AM (#1530) Journal

      The verb 'beshit' is new to me, I think I'm going to borrow it and use regularly.

      That being said, I agree 100% that in the hands of your average 'coder' things are going to get worse, not better.

      Some of these people can barely write "regular" imperative, iterative code, I can hardly wait to see how this works out...

      --
      I'm not in the business... I *am* the business.
    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by siliconwafer on Tuesday February 18 2014, @07:18PM

      by siliconwafer (709) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @07:18PM (#1813)

      I went to college 10 years ago to become a computer engineer/scientist (degrees in both actually) at a pretty well-regarded school. I've worked in industry since then. Only recently have I really begun to understand "Functional Programming" and it has opened my eyes quite a bit. Maybe it's not only the concept of "Lambda functions" but a programming paradigm shift from Imperative to Functional. Everything I've done - in academia and industry - up to now has been in the Imperative world. Functional Programming is really, really cool, and I'm using it more and more regardless of the language I'm working in. I wish I'd been shown this back when I was in school... (or taken the time to learn a Functional language!)

      • (Score: 1) by biff on Tuesday February 18 2014, @10:02PM

        by biff (170) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @10:02PM (#1961)

        Yeah, my exposure to functional programming has been pretty minimal as well -- worked through examples in an AI book in LISP and wrote a couple one-off scripts for GIMP in Scheme. There's certainly an elegance to it, and I'm thinking about learning Haskell to become a little more flexible.

        The problem is when I'm not programming for myself I'm already finding situations where I could either write "ideal" code or maintainable code, which worries me a bit about delving too deeply into another paradigm... but so far it feels like every new language has made me a more thoughtful programmer in the rest.

  • (Score: 1) by Optimus Prime on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:41AM

    by Optimus Prime (358) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:41AM (#1399)
    Okay so I kinda understand the whole modularization effort going on with Java 9 or whatever.
    Would that allow Minecraft to embed their needed Java modules inside the game instead of me having to install and update the bulky Java software for security updates all the time?
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by SpallsHurgenson on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:56AM

      by SpallsHurgenson (656) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:56AM (#1408)

      I would imagine Minecraft is the main reason for Java on a lot of home computers these days. While I still see business apps (usually horribly outdated and requiring an equally deprecated version of Java) around, I can't think of any app that is widely used by Joe Average user on his home PC. On the web, Flash (and lately HTML5) have taken over that side of things, and generally Windows users are quite willing to download and standard executables (which have the advantage of not requiring a side-download of the JRE).

      Ellison should pay Notch a lot of money to keep using Java or Oracle could see its home user numbers drop overnight ;-)

      • (Score: 1) by dilbert on Tuesday February 18 2014, @03:02PM

        by dilbert (444) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @03:02PM (#1632)

        While I still see business apps (usually horribly outdated and requiring an equally deprecated version of Java)

        This is what haunts my dreams at night!

      • (Score: 2, Informative) by monster on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:06PM

        by monster (1260) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:06PM (#1673) Journal

        Java is also used in a lot of home computers in Spain because the AEAT (spanish IRS) offers several multiplatform assistants to do your taxes and they are programmed in Java. There has even been a Linux version for some years now.

        Hey, when a government does something right, it deserves some credit.

    • (Score: 1) by KibiByte on Tuesday February 18 2014, @05:09AM

      by KibiByte (1024) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @05:09AM (#1413)

      Notch could have probably compiled this in Excelsior JET and everything would sit in a single binary, excepting savefile stuff.

      --
      The One True Unit UID
      • (Score: 1) by bugamn on Tuesday February 18 2014, @12:28PM

        by bugamn (1017) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @12:28PM (#1556)

        Would it keep its portability if compiled this way?

        • (Score: 1) by KibiByte on Tuesday February 18 2014, @10:45PM

          by KibiByte (1024) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @10:45PM (#1997)

          Well, the issue here is that what I'm talking about really only applies to executable files/programs, not websites (like the JET compiled version of TuxGuitar versus the Java-required installer.) In essence, I guess with proper programming everyone could just load a SoylentNews EXE and get the latest news. Maybe have a web browser secured and baked in with the bare feature-set required. However, that shit would need to be secured heavily, plugin or standalone.

          --
          The One True Unit UID
          • (Score: 1) by bugamn on Wednesday February 19 2014, @02:39PM

            by bugamn (1017) on Wednesday February 19 2014, @02:39PM (#2482)

            But would this JET compiled SoylentNews EXE load on Windows, Mac and Linux? Minecraft would lose part of its appeal with me if I couldn't play it on Linux anymore.

            • (Score: 1) by KibiByte on Wednesday February 19 2014, @11:09PM

              by KibiByte (1024) on Wednesday February 19 2014, @11:09PM (#2955)

              I do believe JET will compile into executable binaries for Linux and Windows and OSX.

              --
              The One True Unit UID
  • (Score: 2, Funny) by bluehorizons on Tuesday February 18 2014, @05:05AM

    by bluehorizons (1141) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @05:05AM (#1410)

    I like the smell of burning dust on the cpu heatsinks.

    Just so you know... this website is swell!

    --
    There is nothing general about the general public.
  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by elf on Tuesday February 18 2014, @03:22PM

    by elf (64) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @03:22PM (#1646)

    I must be the only one who likes Java here!! There is a lot of misconception and hate with java.

    Java in a browser = crap

    But who writes applets anymore anyway? There must be a lot of historic stuff out there but most browsers don't need Java. Chrome doesn't really have it because it only supports 32 bit and most people will have a 64 bit install. The only reason I use Java plugins at all is for citrix connections for remote working. Jsp java fx is another reason to use java in the browser but again I don't know of many popular websites who use these.

    Java on the server = good

    A lot of server development is done using java. This is because of a variety of reasons. Having done and seen c++ development I can say from my experience java is much better because its easier to do. The arguments about speed are also irrelevant now.

    Java on the client = good and bad

    If you are at a business who has internal systems java is an option for a GUI. It is quite powerful and very portable. Web start is also a good tool for updating. Swing isn't the best windowing tool kit but there are other alternatives.

    One of the alternatives that I like to use is having an opengl gui for 3d graphics development. (www.lwjgl.com)

    In terms of security holes and bugs these mostly effect the java in a browser installs and as I mentioned these are not exactly he majority of the web

    • (Score: 1) by mechanicjay on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:26PM

      by mechanicjay (7) <mechanicjayNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Tuesday February 18 2014, @04:26PM (#1683) Homepage Journal

      Yeah, I've softened to server side Java applications over the years. I still think they use an obnoxious amount of resources and don't scale particularly well, but they're good for portability and they pretty much just work....except when java looses it's mind for some reason and you need to restart the app -- and watch your server's processor peg for a minute or while it instantiates the jvm. On second though, Though I started out with positive intent on the is comment, I'm really not quite sure what's so great about server side java anymore.

      Definitely keep it out of my browser though, except for critical LOB apps. Though, this is causing headaches around here, as with the security features and what not, some vendors aren't paying the protection money to get their jars signed. This makes you jump through a couple of hoops to get the dang things to run. The vendors who are signing their jars however, their apps work on the desktop/browser even with the java security settings set up to 11 -- which is pretty nice.

      --
      My VMS box beat up your Windows box.
    • (Score: 1) by Zwerg_Sense on Tuesday February 18 2014, @10:23PM

      by Zwerg_Sense (927) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @10:23PM (#1979)

      Java on the server = really good.

      Is this then also the opportunity to bitch about php?

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19 2014, @02:59AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19 2014, @02:59AM (#2112)

      In my personal experience, java applications on the client machine (I'm thinking here mainly of jitsi and minecraft, as they're what I have the most recent personal experience with) tend to have issues with stability after a few days of runtime, and can wreak havoc in that regard much more than any other particular language. I can't say I have a strong understanding of the lower level goings on here, and it's entirely possible that it's just a matter of poorly written java being a bit of an epidemic (much like the issue with php), but it amounts to my having a bit of an aversion to using java when I can avoid it. That it provides a particularly easy malware vector into non-windows environments (write once, run anywhere!) doesn't exactly give it any added preference either.