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posted by Dopefish on Thursday February 20 2014, @01:30PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the stop-shipping-beta-quality-code dept.

combatserver writes:

"The folks over at Dark Side of Gaming are reporting an interesting development in the game modding community--a recently released modification for the blockbuster game from Bethesda, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim (PC version). A long-running issue with the game since release has been recurring CTDs (crashes to desktop) and infinite loading screens that often bring the game to a grinding halt after just a few minutes of play, especially when heavily modded. Bethesda has tried to resolve the issue with several patches, to no avail.

Sheson, a member of the Skyrim modding community, fixed Skyrim. According to many user reports--thousands, in fact--Sheson's relatively minor adjustment to memory allocation has solved the vast majority of stability issues. The improvements have increased game performance far beyond what anyone had expected. Players are now merging mods to get around the hard-coded cap of 256 mods that Skyrim can load at any given time, effectively packing more content into the game. The fix also allows for Skyrim to run on lower-end PCs, widening the market for a game that has already sold over 20 million copies.

Since Sheson's patch released, the fix has been repackaged by other community members as a mod for Skyrim to make it even more accessible. Skyrim players who use the script-extender SKSE will be pleased to hear that the patch will be included in the next build."

[ED Note: Bottom line -- Bethesda shouldn't be packaging poorly written and untested code for sale, then requiring gamers to pay to play as beta testers. Kudos to Sheson for his hard work and effort.]

Related Stories

State of the Site: 02/23/2014 108 comments
Well, we've survived our first week as a functional website, and have yet to go belly up because of it. The speed and growth of our community is staggering to say the least, and we are working hard to get this site fully operational. I'm pleased to announce that a development VM is now available for public consumption, and if you're interested in site development, one should join us in #dev on irc.soylentnews.org. Beyond that though, I've got a few points to address on and updated statistics to share ...
Skyrim Mod Team Accuses Another Mod Team of Stealing Source Code 2 comments

Skyrim mod drama gets ugly with allegations of stolen code and misappropriated donations

One of the more useful [The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim] mods, for developers but indirectly for players, is the Skyrim Script Extender, or SKSE. It basically allows for more complex behaviors for objects, locations and NPCs. How do you have a character seek shelter from the rain if there's no weather-based behaviors in their original AI? That sort of thing (though that's an invented example). SKSE goes back a long way and the creators provide much of the code for others to use under a free license, while declining donations themselves.

Another project is Skyrim Together (ST), a small team that since 2013 has (among others) been working on adding multiplayer functionality to the game — their Patreon account, in contrast, is pulling in more than $30,000 a month. The main dev there allegedly independently distributed a modified version of SKSE several years ago against the terms of the license, and was henceforth specifically banned from using SKSE code in the future.

Guess what SKSE's lead found in a bit of code inspection the other day?

Yes, unfortunately, it seems that SKSE code is in the ST app, not only in violation of the license as far as not giving credit, but in that the dev himself has been barred from using it, and furthermore that — although there is some debate here — the ST team is essentially charging for access to a "closed beta." Some say that it's just a donation they ask for, but requiring a donation is really indistinguishable from charging for something.

Response from Skyrim Together.

Related: Modder Fixes What Bethesda Couldn't -- Skyrim
Bethesda 'Creation Club' for Skyrim and Fallout 4: No "Paid Mods" Here!


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  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @01:35PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @01:35PM (#3414)

    I would much rather have a buggy game with mod tools than a buggy game without mod tools.

    • (Score: 5, Funny) by bryn on Thursday February 20 2014, @01:38PM

      by bryn (2394) on Thursday February 20 2014, @01:38PM (#3419)

      What, even an EA game? :)

      --
      He who dares wins. He who hesitates, doesn't.
    • (Score: 4, Insightful) by darinbob on Friday February 21 2014, @02:54AM

      by darinbob (2593) on Friday February 21 2014, @02:54AM (#4020)

      If we require non-buggy games, then the gaming industry would have died years ago. Yes, Bethesda puts out stuff that has bugs, but rarely are they completely showstopping bugs (but sometimes yes). And yet some people rage endlessly about it, calling them the worst devs of all time (apparently many companies are allowed to share the number one title).

      Some of my favorite games are buggy, and some of the worst games were solid.

      There are bigger issues in gaming to worry about. Micro-DLCs, always-on connections, required accounts to play, DRM, etc. Was laughing hard in Dragon Age, in reference to the Penny Arcade string, when I first encountered a quest in the game that required purchasing a DLC.

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by SGT CAPSLOCK on Thursday February 20 2014, @01:41PM

    by SGT CAPSLOCK (118) on Thursday February 20 2014, @01:41PM (#3422) Journal

    Bethesda and I go way back. I was one of those people that was crazy excited when Morrowind was released (and to this day I still play it, heavily modified to look more beautiful than Skyrim!).

    As much as I love their games, I can't think of one that they've released that hasn't been riddled with crippling bugs. To this very day, getting the music to play in Fallout 3 without crashing the game/stuttering/etc can be a really tasking nightmare.

    But the games are so fun, I keep buying them! And I'll keep buying them. The awesome modding communities don't get enough thanks from Bethesda for the things they do to make their games properly playable, IMO.

    • (Score: 4, Interesting) by ticho on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:24PM

      by ticho (89) on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:24PM (#3448) Homepage Journal

      Indeed, I still remember having to regularly run the player-made utilities to fix Daggerfall savegames (remove orphaned quest items, unfinishable quests, stuck storyline, etc.) Bethesda likes their games buggy.

    • (Score: 2, Interesting) by SyntaxError on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:55PM

      by SyntaxError (1577) on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:55PM (#3473)

      What did you do to make morrowwind look better than skyrim? I never played that one.

      • (Score: 5, Informative) by SGT CAPSLOCK on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:19PM

        by SGT CAPSLOCK (118) on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:19PM (#3489) Journal
        Oh man, that's a tough question to answer...

        Basically, the first step I always take is to download this thing called the Morrowind Sound and Graphics Overhaul (MGSO) which is essentially a scripted installer that includes all sorts of stuff such as:

        - MGE (Morrowind Graphics Extender) -- makes the game work in widescreen, adds pixel shaders, generates distant land, etc
        - MCP (Morrowind Code Patch) -- fixes the bugs in the game and adds lots of modern features to make it more playable
        - 4GB Memory Patch
        - LOTS of mods to enhance the graphics and sounds, etc

        MGSO's home page is here [ornitocopter.net].

        After that, a good site to start with is the Morrowind Nexus [nexusmods.com] -- especially the "top files" section. Download and test things until it suits your tastes! :p
        • (Score: 2, Funny) by jcd on Thursday February 20 2014, @05:26PM

          by jcd (883) on Thursday February 20 2014, @05:26PM (#3579)

          No! No, you can't make me reinstall it again! No, I won't do it.... no.....

          --
          "What good's an honest soldier if he can be ordered to behave like a terrorist?"
        • (Score: 2, Informative) by darinbob on Friday February 21 2014, @03:05AM

          by darinbob (2593) on Friday February 21 2014, @03:05AM (#4027)

          Well the characters for sure will never look better than Skyrim. But the landscape can be. It helps that Morrowind has a lot of barren areas and ash deserts. So just some retexturing helps a lot, and in areas by the ocean they can plop down more plants.

          However it's not necessary. You really can play it without the mods and enjoy it, and get past the graphics pretty quickly. Though mods to improve the UI so that more fits on the screen, add the unofficial patches, and so forth, will be handy. It's much more of a sandbox than Skryim is, there's a lot of land area than is covered by all the quests, etc. It has its own unique feel; Oblivion was too much like generic fantasy, Skyrim was too much like generic nordic fantasy with dragons, but Morrowind has a very alien feel and unusual creatures. (though these unusual creates are now commonplace in ESO, with guar down in southern Tamriel, bah humbug)

        • (Score: 2) by ticho on Saturday February 22 2014, @10:27AM

          by ticho (89) on Saturday February 22 2014, @10:27AM (#4772) Homepage Journal

          Is MGSO the same project as Skywind [tesrenewal.com]? Probably not, the Skywind guys seem to be a bit more ambitious, remodeling and retexturing entire landscapes, creating new models, and recording voice for dialogs in Morrowind.

          From the dev video they released [youtube.com], it looks impressive. Hopefully they won't give up, and Bethesda won't slap them with a C&D.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by NCommander on Thursday February 20 2014, @04:33PM

      by NCommander (2) Subscriber Badge <mcasadevall@soylentnews.org> on Thursday February 20 2014, @04:33PM (#3557) Homepage Journal

      Suprisingly, as far as the engine itself goes, I've had relatively good luck with Fallout: New Vegas (Steam), though the game script has bugs which are at least cross platform.

      --
      Still always moving
      • (Score: 3, Interesting) by combatserver on Thursday February 20 2014, @10:55PM

        by combatserver (38) on Thursday February 20 2014, @10:55PM (#3832)

        "... I've had relatively good luck with Fallout: New Vegas..."

        You bring up a good point--they share the same engine. I wonder if anyone has tried applying Sheson's patch to Fallout: New Vegas?

        --
        I hope I can change this later...
        • (Score: 1) by darinbob on Friday February 21 2014, @03:09AM

          by darinbob (2593) on Friday February 21 2014, @03:09AM (#4028)

          Fallout New Vegas (and Fallout 3) shares the same engine as Oblivion. Skyrim is the next generation engine (and will most likely be shared with Fallout 4). The patch as-is probably won't work but it's possible that the concept would.

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by me on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:00PM

    by me (1944) on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:00PM (#3434)

    I bought Skyrim as soon as it was released, having loved Oblivion, especially the Shivering Isles expansion.

    However, Skyrim was almost unplayable on the PC - its UI was designed for the consoles and it just sucked.

    I tried a couple of the early UI mods, and they made things better, but still not good.

    I gave up and moved onto better things.

    Maybe it's time to dig it out and have a anther look.

    Note to self: when buying games wait until they are 6 months old, stable, and half price.

    • (Score: 5, Informative) by NecroDM on Thursday February 20 2014, @04:25PM

      by NecroDM (376) on Thursday February 20 2014, @04:25PM (#3552)

      You should try SKYUI http://www.nexusmods.com/skyrim/mods/3863/ [nexusmods.com]
      It'll make Skyrim much better looking in the UI department, even if it's not as good as Morrowind or even Oblivion at least makes it usable.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by aquacrayfish on Thursday February 20 2014, @05:57PM

      by aquacrayfish (2379) on Thursday February 20 2014, @05:57PM (#3599)

      This has been a general problem that Bethesda has had with all their PC games. Weird bugs, stability, not necessarily the best UI, dating back to at least Morrowind (when I first started playing their games). I didn't get into Skyrim until about 7 months after launch due to other games in the queue. The modding community has been fantastic for this game for a long time. In short, it's Skyrim's biggest strength and, in a weird way, its biggest weakness.

      Bethesda provided a great game where they allowed people to mess with anything. That's been terrific. The game's backbone is pretty darn perfect. It's implementation has shown numerous bugs and needed tweaks, graphics updates, etc., that the community has banded together and repaired/upgraded. I have to wonder if Bethesda was relying on that with this game, not that it was unplayable at launch, but the game has dramatically improved since.

      • (Score: 4, Insightful) by combatserver on Thursday February 20 2014, @11:06PM

        by combatserver (38) on Thursday February 20 2014, @11:06PM (#3847)

        "... but the game has dramatically improved since."

        Understatement of the thread.

        I am constantly amazed by some of the mods people are creating--hundreds of NPCs in civil-war type battles, fully voiced and scripted followers that bring the game to life with personalities (Vilja, Caele, Cicero to name a few), completely new lands and more objects and armor than you can shake a stick at.

        The newer followers are what interested me the most--there is room to create a functioning "society" once people start making enough of these followers (and other NPCs). They interact in unexpected ways, bringing new levels of interaction that simply were not possible before--some of them highly entertaining.

        --
        I hope I can change this later...
  • (Score: 0, Offtopic) by GeminiDomino on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:20PM

    by GeminiDomino (661) on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:20PM (#3445)

    Is this Sheson guy the one who runs the linked blog or something? I can't imagine why else "Someone creates mod to fix buggy ass Bethesda" game might be newsworthy. Sure, it's cool and all, but it's not news. The UKSP [iguanadons.net] fixes what, hundreds of bugs, and is over 2 years old.

    --
    "We've been attacked by the intelligent, educated segment of our culture"
    • (Score: 5, Funny) by bryn on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:22PM

      by bryn (2394) on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:22PM (#3447)

      Wow, the slashdot-style "news/not news" people have moved over here too ;)

      --
      He who dares wins. He who hesitates, doesn't.
      • (Score: 4, Funny) by cwix on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:54PM

        by cwix (873) on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:54PM (#3472)

        Makes you feel at home doesn't it?

      • (Score: 5, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:31PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:31PM (#3504)

        I find 'news' like this more akin to what the SD site used to be. I enjoy it. I do not enjoy the click-bait/argument/fest the other site has become. Many of the stories over on SD seem to be little more than argument generators.

    • (Score: 5, Informative) by SpallsHurgenson on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:27PM

      by SpallsHurgenson (656) on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:27PM (#3451)

      The editorial comment at the end was uncalled for as well. For millions of players, Skyrim worked fine (or as well as any other piece of consumer-grade software) out of the box, and Bethesda poured a lot of after-release support into the game with additional patches and DLC. The problem fixed by the patch in TFA is largely encountered only by users who bolt on extra content using third-party mods and push the game's framework far further than it was ever expected to go. Now, that is not to diminish the work of Sheson or any of the excellent mods out there (at last count, my own Skyrim installation had close to 80) but one can hardly blame Bethesda for not supporting these configurations.

      With that said, this patch truly is a lifesaver for Skyrim fans who do use third-party mods. The frequent crashes were getting really annoying! But I don't blame anyone for that problem but myself; had I returned to vanilla Skyrim the crashes would have vanished.

      • (Score: 3, Insightful) by spiritfiend on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:31PM

        by spiritfiend (964) on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:31PM (#3503)

        Yes, it certainly seems from the article that these problems were caused by using too many mods, and not the main game itself. Considering the game is no longer supported [egmnow.com], they could hardly be faulted for not fixing bugs caused by new mods.

      • (Score: 2, Informative) by mrcoolbp on Thursday February 20 2014, @06:30PM

        by mrcoolbp (68) <mrcoolbp@soylentnews.org> on Thursday February 20 2014, @06:30PM (#3620) Homepage

        I don't know, I played the console ver. (Un-modded, patched) and it still crashed a lot. Had to redo large portions a few times. Just my anecdote.

        --
        (Score:1^½, Radical)
      • (Score: 2, Informative) by Dopefish on Thursday February 20 2014, @11:48PM

        by Dopefish (12) on Thursday February 20 2014, @11:48PM (#3882)

        Hi SpallsHurgenson,

        Approving editor here. As someone who has played Skyrim, I can attest that my experience with the game in terms of stability were quite lacking. Although my comment at the end may have been out of line in your view, you also don't represent all gamers that played the game. I'm not here to start a flamefest, but point out that buggy code, especially from a AAA development house, especially on fixed console hardware, is simply unacceptable. I'm not the only one who feels this way. Google search the terms "Skyrim buggy" and you will get plenty of hits on the matter. I have linked a few examples below...

        http://bitscreed.com/skyrim-is-a-buggy-broken-unpo lished-game/ [bitscreed.com]

        http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/615803-the-elder-sc rolls-v-skyrim/66700996 [gamefaqs.com]

        • (Score: 1) by darinbob on Friday February 21 2014, @03:15AM

          by darinbob (2593) on Friday February 21 2014, @03:15AM (#4033)

          I'd rather see editorial comments being down away from the article itself. Inserted inline feels wrong.

          • (Score: 1) by Dopefish on Friday February 21 2014, @06:18AM

            by Dopefish (12) on Friday February 21 2014, @06:18AM (#4122)

            My editorial remark on the topic (and on all submissions we approve here at SoylentNews) are clearly denoted with a "ED Note:" descriptor.

            Inline insertion implies that my comments were added within the submission itself, which is clearly not the case here.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:28PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:28PM (#3452)

      I can't quite think of another example of where the community has taken matters into their own hands to solve problems socials with an original product. Must be something in the air at the moment but definitely very relevant news for soylent..

      • (Score: 2) by GeminiDomino on Thursday February 20 2014, @10:28PM

        by GeminiDomino (661) on Thursday February 20 2014, @10:28PM (#3800)

        That was my point (which was apparently widely missed). Not only did the community take matters into their own hands with Skyrim, a long long time ago (in gaming terms): it wasn't even the first time. The Unofficial Oblivion Patch is even bigger than the Skyrim one.

        --
        "We've been attacked by the intelligent, educated segment of our culture"
        • (Score: 1) by darinbob on Friday February 21 2014, @03:18AM

          by darinbob (2593) on Friday February 21 2014, @03:18AM (#4037)

          And it's been done in Morrowind, Daggerfall, Baldur's Gate 1 and 2, Icewind Dale, and so on and so on. There's a long long history of community supported patches and the like.

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Skarjak on Thursday February 20 2014, @05:10PM

      by Skarjak (730) on Thursday February 20 2014, @05:10PM (#3571)

      You don't think it's relevant and interesting that one dude easily fixed a major bug with a AAA product that's been out for a while? To me, that is an important video game industry issue. It shows how low the standards for code are in these companies, that they think this is fine to release at full price. Also goes to show that when we wait for months for patches, it's not always because the fix is hard to implement...

      • (Score: 2) by GeminiDomino on Thursday February 20 2014, @10:30PM

        by GeminiDomino (661) on Thursday February 20 2014, @10:30PM (#3804)

        You don't think it's relevant and interesting that one dude easily fixed a major bug with a AAA product that's been out for a while?

        It was, but it's hardly the first time, and certainly not as noteworthy as some of the other bugfix mods that people have made to fix Bethesda's bug-fests.

        Maybe I'm just the odd man out here because I'm familiar with the Elder Scrolls modding community, so this posting to me is like seeing a story about "Shady Chinese Firm puts Dirty Picture Gallery App on Google Play Store."

        --
        "We've been attacked by the intelligent, educated segment of our culture"
  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by ticho on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:26PM

    by ticho (89) on Thursday February 20 2014, @02:26PM (#3450) Homepage Journal

    The title should have been "Modder Fixes What Bethesda _Wouldn't_". I have no doubt their developers would be able to do the same optimization, maybe even better than this guy, but they simply couldn't be bothered.

    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:10PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:10PM (#3478)

      The title should have been "Modder Fixes What Bethesda _Wouldn't_". I have no doubt their developers would be able to do the same optimization, maybe even better than this guy, but they simply couldn't be bothered.

      Of course they couldn't be bothered; they already got their money from everybody.

      Although it's about Mass Effect, the joke of this comic (http://www.vgcats.com/comics/?strip_id=312 [vgcats.com]) applies here, as well.

      -- Posted AC to retain moderation

    • (Score: 2, Interesting) by jcd on Thursday February 20 2014, @05:31PM

      by jcd (883) on Thursday February 20 2014, @05:31PM (#3582)

      This really is the key. And this is a huge problem in the video game industry, especially ones that allow modding. Somehow the community has become responsible for fixing poorly coded games, allowing [insert studio here] to charge huge amounts of money for a game that still needs to be fixed by someone who's not getting paid. Way to save on those debugging and troubleshooting costs.

      --
      "What good's an honest soldier if he can be ordered to behave like a terrorist?"
      • (Score: 1) by darinbob on Friday February 21 2014, @03:28AM

        by darinbob (2593) on Friday February 21 2014, @03:28AM (#4040)

        On the other hand there are many games which have glaring bugs and no easy way to fix them. Those that allow modding did so to allow "modding" as their only goal; the fact that players used tools to fix bugs was a side effect. I really don't think any game maker decided to ship a buggy game knowing that someone external would fix it later.

        As for this particular fix; it was done without a normal mod that overrides data files. It's actually an external DLL used to shadow and override executable code. It's only a "mod" in the sense that it is external file used to modify the game.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @09:41PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @09:41PM (#3743)

      Given how this "fix" just masks a bug (that is still present) in their memory manager, it's pretty obvious why this didn't ship.
      Funny that the INI setting's header is NotPlacebo.
      Lame.

  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by TWiTfan on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:33PM

    by TWiTfan (2428) on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:33PM (#3505)

    As a mostly console gamer, one of the things I really wished is that more studios would allow mods on consoles games too. I'm really tempted to just hook my PC up to my TV and get a console-style controller for it just so I can play the mods. Does anyone know if the PC version of Skyrim will work with an Xbox/PS3 style PC controller?

    And please, no proselytizing for mouse/keyboard. I'm not looking for yet another PC-vs.-Console pissing contest.

    --
    If real life were like D&D, my Charisma score would be a negative number
    • (Score: 4, Informative) by Cactus on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:57PM

      by Cactus (32) on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:57PM (#3525) Journal
      I'm not sure about Skyrim directly supporting it, but using something like this receiver [amazon.com] and a wireless controller does work with most games. For those that don't support the controller, I've seen programs like JoyToKey [joytokey.net]. Not sure how well they work though.
    • (Score: 2, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @08:08PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2014, @08:08PM (#3669)

      Skyrim (the steam version, I'm not sure about standalone) supports the Xbox360 controller 'out-of-the-box'.
      Sometimes when I fancy a break from mouse and keyboard Skyrim I'll use my PS3 controller and emulate a 360 controller.
      The excellent 'Better DS3' program will make doing this a breeze if you've only a PS3 one.

      Get it here: http://betterds3.ciebiera.net/ [ciebiera.net]

      • (Score: 1) by TWiTfan on Thursday February 20 2014, @09:40PM

        by TWiTfan (2428) on Thursday February 20 2014, @09:40PM (#3740)

        Thanks for the info. I've done a little research on this today, and also heard good things about a program called "Xpadder" (for games that don't natively support controllers).

        --
        If real life were like D&D, my Charisma score would be a negative number
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by combatserver on Thursday February 20 2014, @10:29PM

      by combatserver (38) on Thursday February 20 2014, @10:29PM (#3801)

      For a XBox360 controller emulator, I used the following--after a few hours game-play, I discovered I prefer the keyboard/mouse combo.

      https://code.google.com/p/x360ce/ [google.com]

      --
      I hope I can change this later...
    • (Score: 1) by ArghBlarg on Friday February 21 2014, @06:52PM

      by ArghBlarg (1449) on Friday February 21 2014, @06:52PM (#4456)

      I can confirm it works just like the xbox360 once you buy a Microsoft controller for your Windows PC. In fact, I found the control remapping for keyboard/mouse quite buggy in Skyrim, so it was fortunate I already had a controller :). Just change to controller mode and forget the PC keyboard/mouse setup.

  • (Score: 2, Informative) by CoolHand on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:33PM

    by CoolHand (438) on Thursday February 20 2014, @03:33PM (#3506) Journal

    Hopefully this allows me to bump up my settings even more when running under Wine..

    --
    Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job-Douglas Adams
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by combatserver on Thursday February 20 2014, @10:37PM

      by combatserver (38) on Thursday February 20 2014, @10:37PM (#3813)

      "Hopefully this allows me to bump up my settings even more when running under Wine.."

      I see no reason why it wouldn't--I ran out of settings to turn up to maximum after applying the patch. I turned up everything I could, as well as added a mod that increases draw distance to the point that if something is line of sight (mountains, etc) you can see it, although distance effects are still applied. When you start adding custom ENB's, the game goes from amazing to "holy shit". I've seen some screenshots of the game from people running 3D drivers that look stunning--the depth they add put you in the game.

      --
      I hope I can change this later...
    • (Score: 1) by mvar on Thursday February 20 2014, @11:14PM

      by mvar (2539) on Thursday February 20 2014, @11:14PM (#3854)

      that's weird i never had any such issues running Skyrim on Wine. Perhaps 1 or 2 crashes to desktop (after *lots* of hours of gameplay), but loading times between areas were (are) very reasonable.

  • (Score: 1) by egcagrac0 on Friday February 21 2014, @05:39PM

    by egcagrac0 (2705) on Friday February 21 2014, @05:39PM (#4433)

    Someone needs to mod modder up.