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posted by Dopefish on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:00PM   Printer-friendly
from the we-want-netflix-to-reboot-firefly dept.

TBNZee writes:

"Mainstream television has, for a long time, under-served the science fiction loving segment. But with declining production costs, there seem to be two potential sources of alternative production/distribution: digital content (e.g. Netflix, Hulu) and crowd-funded projects. There's still not a lot of science fiction shows that are being produced by the major streaming services, but we'll probably see more with the success of Hulu's exclusive U.S. distribution of Misfits or Netflix's Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Doctor Who. On the other hand, you have many enthusiastic upstarts on Kickstarter that look novel and engaging while having a surprisingly professional look to them.

Which do you think will ultimately be more successful? Do you have any recommendations for other good material out there, or is there something you would like to see?"

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  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by soulde on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:11PM

    by soulde (27) on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:11PM (#5199)

    Ok, ok. The question is: When Firefly will come again? :D

    • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Spottywot on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:16PM

      by Spottywot (2784) on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:16PM (#5201)

      I nearly responded then but realised you are having a little jest:)
        I personally would love to see a film or even series of Iain M Banks stuff. I guess the ship to ship communication would have to be 'adapted' somewhat, but done well the 'Culture' universe would look fantastic on the screen.

    • (Score: 4, Funny) by Jaruzel on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:11PM

      by Jaruzel (812) on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:11PM (#5227) Homepage Journal

      Ok, ok. The question is: When Firefly will come again? :D

      Never. I heard that Captain Reynolds retired and became a famous Crime Writer...

      --
      This is my opinion, there are many others, but this one is mine.
    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by OGbear on Sunday February 23 2014, @07:13PM

      by OGbear (2675) on Sunday February 23 2014, @07:13PM (#5281) Journal

      See Browncoats:independence war ( http://www.browncoatsuniverse.com/ [browncoatsuniverse.com] ) Comming to a ComicCon in San Diego this summer.

      OGBear

    • (Score: 2, Interesting) by lennier on Monday February 24 2014, @04:16AM

      by lennier (2199) on Monday February 24 2014, @04:16AM (#5524)

      I guess I'm the only geek who was fairly underwhelmed by Firefly?

      Yes, I watched all the episodes. On DVD. In the correct order. Then the movie. But I'm sorry to say it just didn't do that much for me, and I loved Buffy.

      There's one thing I loved about Firefly (and pretty much all Whedon material) and that's the dialog writing. But the lack of... for want of a better word, 'social geography' * in the Firefly universe just left me cold.

      * Like, I can forgive glaring wrong-even-for-19th-century scientific inaccuracies like the old "Earth got used up" chestnut which is not how ecology OR space colonisation works, confusing systems and galaxies (handwaved in post with The Verse as a single system), and spaceship battles being fought at ranges of tens of metres rather than thousands of kilometres. But it was the world not fundamentally making sense as a society that bugged me. People are poor dirt farmers, but can afford interplanetary spaceships? The setup is a complete duplicate of the US Civil War as told by the South, with Reavers as politically correct Indians, but there no slaves? So what was the war over then? People don't get mad enough to kill their brothers without there being disagreements. See, if you want to go the "literal, and I mean literal, Wild West in Space" route, there could at least have been robots with the North, er, Alliance granting them human citizenship being the catalyst for the war. But that would've been uncomfortably close to reality. So it was a civil war about nothing other than ALLIANCE PURE EVIL, but getting all the emotion of the 1860s for free. And that was one of many things that come from porting the 1800s into the future that didn't work for me.

      --
      Delenda est Beta
      • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Monday February 24 2014, @03:39PM

        by tangomargarine (667) on Monday February 24 2014, @03:39PM (#5880)

        wrong-even-for-19th-century scientific inaccuracies like the old "Earth got used up"

        IIRC the line (in Serenity) was "Earth-That-Was could no longer hold our numbers; we were so many..." (paraphrased), which is debatably not really "using it all up."

        confusing systems and galaxies (handwaved in post with The Verse as a single system)

        Yes, it was handwaved as a single "system" with 3 or 4 stars and planets and moons orbiting each, which seems to stretch the definition of a system somewhat...and make navigation a real bitch.

        and spaceship battles being fought at ranges of tens of metres rather than thousands of kilometres

        Hey, at least they didn't have shields or sound in space :) Although IIRC the only major battle was in Serenity, and that was because of the atmospheric crud they never explained keeping the Reaver fleet hidden until it was right on top of the Alliance, so they never had a chance to open up at long range (which they undoubtedly would have done since the ships had missiles).

        People are poor dirt farmers, but can afford interplanetary spaceships?

        The majority couldn't. In the first episode, they find that one ship that would barely make it to the frontier one-way, and there were 14 (?) families on it. Presumably they all chipped in to scrape together the money. Or probably taken out a loan or something, I guess.

        The setup is a complete duplicate of the US Civil War as told by the South, with Reavers as politically correct Indians, but there no slaves? So what was the war over then?

        States' rights, apparently.

        there could at least have been robots with the North, er, Alliance granting them human citizenship being the catalyst for the war. But that would've been uncomfortably close to reality.

        Considering how much effort the show made to seem based in reality, this sounds like it would have been much worse to me.

        I just had the thought the other day that we didn't actually see Badger on the viewscreens of their dead friends in Serenity, so I'd like to think that that's a possible avenue for them to bring it back: Badger lost his organization and is on the run, but due to freak luck is still alive, and the show follows him around.

        --
        "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
        • (Score: 1) by tangomargarine on Wednesday February 26 2014, @03:30PM

          by tangomargarine (667) on Wednesday February 26 2014, @03:30PM (#7335)

          The majority couldn't. In the first episode, they find that one ship

          Oops--I meant to say the third episode, "Buckwacked." They were also pilfering stuff off a ship in the pilot but we never saw them go inside.

          --
          "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
  • (Score: 1) by Schafer2 on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:14PM

    by Schafer2 (348) on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:14PM (#5200)

    The links in the summary refer back to Soylent News and are broken.

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by lubricus on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:17PM

    by lubricus (232) on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:17PM (#5202)

    Just want to point out some projects out there:
    If you like models, pro-building, and industry talk, Steve Neill's Garage [youtube.com] is cool. Some of the people who showed up on his channel include the Space Opera Society [indiegogo.com].

    Also, John Hodgman just talked about this on his podcast: Judge John Hodgman Episode 148: Science Friction [maximumfun.org]. The conversation was pretty interesting. His guest Jane Espenson [imdb.com] pointed out that while SciFi movies do very well, TV is afraid to do SciFi because they fear it will become too campy. She also points out that SciFi can be thought of as a *setting*, not necessarily as a genre.

    So, there's lots of interest, and SciFi fans are pre-adapted to maintain the genere with our own passion and technical abilities, but in the end, I think it's just a matter of trends. We got through the vampires, now we just have to wait out the zombies. One of these times SciFy has to come back, right?

    --
    ... sorry about the typos
    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by mcgrew on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:42PM

      by mcgrew (701) <publish@mcgrewbooks.com> on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:42PM (#5213) Homepage Journal

      I'd like to see more projects like Star Wreck. Community-supported, not corporate cash grabs. Perhaps your comment will stimulate some.

      --
      mcgrewbooks.com mcgrew.info nooze.org
      • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Ethanol-fueled on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:24PM

        by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:24PM (#5233) Homepage

        A modern remake of Gayniggers from Outer Space [wikipedia.org] would be a huge hit among the Sci-Fi crowd, especially with big-name celebrities like the Wayans brothers, Michael Sam, Manti Te'o, RuPaul...the possibilities are limitless!

        A soundtrack could also be provided by famed homosexual rapper Faggot Bruce [youtube.com].

      • (Score: 1) by lhsi on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:28PM

        by lhsi (711) on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:28PM (#5234) Journal

        Did you see Pioneer One? That was out a couple of years ago and was distributed via bittorrent.

  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by gallondr00nk on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:38PM

    by gallondr00nk (392) on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:38PM (#5210)

    I'm surprised no-one has attempted to make a series out of it yet. Apparantly AMC picked it up in 2008, though it seems to have had very little done with it since.

  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by Kilo110 on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:48PM

    by Kilo110 (2853) Subscriber Badge on Sunday February 23 2014, @04:48PM (#5217)

    New Stargate series please. And nothing like that soap opera crap that Stargate Universe was. As a diehard fan, I'm happy that abomination of a show was canned.

    • (Score: 4, Interesting) by Jaruzel on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:05PM

      by Jaruzel (812) on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:05PM (#5224) Homepage Journal

      I was really getting along with SG:U. I loved the darker look, and the unknown stuff around what the ship was doing... But like all good things, it got totally screwed up by the impatient writers, by doing two things [see below].

      I think the look and feel was good, it was just let down by bad plot decisions. And c'mon, no matter how much you love Stargate (film), SG:1 and SG:A (and I do.)... After over 15+ seasons, it severely needed a refresh.

      -Jar

      ****SPOILER ALERT****

      1. Providing access to Destiny's main computer too early on - which killed the 'we're not in control!' angle.
      2. The big reveal as to where Destiny is going and why (OMG... Why?!).

      --
      This is my opinion, there are many others, but this one is mine.
      • (Score: 1) by StarFall on Monday February 24 2014, @01:48AM

        by StarFall (2894) on Monday February 24 2014, @01:48AM (#5433)

        While I understand and agree with to a certain extent your two points. How much of these revelations coming (too) early were an attempt by the writers to "wrap things" up so to speak as they saw the cancellation writing on the wall, and were trying to provide closure to the story?

        Firefly and SG:U died before their time, with Firefly pretty much having no chance with the out of order episodes and constantly moving air times.

        I'm saddened neither show was allowed to gain its footing and find an audience. Somehow it's stymied further sci-fi tv shows in the last 10 years outside of Doctor Who.

        • (Score: 2, Insightful) by Foobar Bazbot on Monday February 24 2014, @03:43AM

          by Foobar Bazbot (37) on Monday February 24 2014, @03:43AM (#5501) Journal

          I'm saddened neither show was allowed to gain its footing and find an audience. Somehow it's stymied further sci-fi tv shows in the last 10 years outside of Doctor Who.

          Wow, the universe you're living in must totally suck.

          Here in our universe, over the last decade we've had Fringe, Alphas, Dollhouse, Battlestar Galactica, Caprica, Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles, Eureka, Outcasts, V, Flashforward, and The Event. Right now, Almost Human, Continuum, Defiance, Falling Skies, Orphan Black, The Tomorrow People, and Warehouse 13 are all ongoing. Sure, some of those are junk, and some that weren't junk were cancelled before their time, but the same goes for SF shows in other decades, or for non-SF shows. None of us are really in a position to say whether there'd have been even more SF on TV if $EVENT had gone differently in the past, but your talk of stymiage seems to be portraying things rather bleaker than they are.

          Anyway, you seem to be remembering the failures of Firefly (which aired in 2002) and Stargate Universe (which aired from 2009 to 2011) as two contemporary events which shaped the last decade of TV. Firefly makes sense chronologically (though I'd argue its mistreatment and cancellation was far more a symptom of what's wrong (and has been wrong, and AFAICS will continue to be wrong) with the TV industry, both generally and WRT SF specifically, than an actual cause of any change), but SG-U was right in the middle of the last decade of TV.

          • (Score: 1) by lennier on Monday February 24 2014, @04:22AM

            by lennier (2199) on Monday February 24 2014, @04:22AM (#5528)

            "Firefly (which aired in 2002)"

            Yikes. It was that long ago?

            I feel old.

            --
            Delenda est Beta
          • (Score: 2) by StarFall on Monday February 24 2014, @08:51AM

            by StarFall (2894) on Monday February 24 2014, @08:51AM (#5685)

            Ok you got me. I guess I'm thinking space sci-fi, but yes I then totally skipped BsG, Caprica, Razor of which I've seen of all of them. So lets go over some of the others you mentioned.

            I watched all of Fringe liked it a lot, had a full run, surprisingly, I fully expected the show to have been cancelled long before it was able to conclude, thankfully it wrapped up all the loose ends rather well. Terminator:TSCC watched all of it, cancelled early. V liked it better than the old V, cancelled. Orphan Black pretty good only one season so far. Continuum love it hopefully will continue. Dollhouse good, cancelled early. Almost Human bleah. Eureka same. Warehouse 13 watched for a year or so lost interest. Revolution same boat, watched for a season, and couldn't take it anymore. Defiance watched a couple episodes, just wasn't interesting enough. Weren't both FlashForward and The Event cancelled early? I couldn't get into either of them, and felt the ban-hammer coming for them anyway.

            We had one season of Tron:Uprising, that was cancelled. Star Wars:The Clone Wars was good, 5 year run, cancelled, but then I hear Netflix gets to wrap the show up with 13 episodes, so we get a season 6, yay, how often does a show get a chance like that? Supposedly they are coming out with a new SW show or two, will have to see how those do.

            I like a good thought provoking space sci-fi episodic show ala the Star Trek's, Farscape, Firefly, BsG, SG:U and there just isn't one right now outside the aforementioned DW. Not to mention most show's seasons are down to 11 or fewer episodes. Although if fewer, episodes will keep a show on year after year, I'll take it, but it seems like it would be hard to develop a good following that way. Though, somehow DW seems to thrive on it. Maybe that's the future of SF, Orphan Black and Continuum seem to be doing well with it.

            So yeah, maybe I am just a bit bleak, oh well, I think I'm justified by the number of decent shows that get canned and then the others just keep getting renewed. Still waiting for new Orphan Black and Continuum episodes to drop. And wishing Paramount would see fit to do new Star Trek's again. I'd even go for another Andromeda, not Farscape/Firefly quality, but it was good. Just no Lexx, please, ugh, just no.

    • (Score: 1) by aiwarrior on Sunday February 23 2014, @11:53PM

      by aiwarrior (1812) on Sunday February 23 2014, @11:53PM (#5381) Journal

      I completely disagree. You may call it soap opera but I liked a lot the human side of things. The great thing about sci fi is the ability to put people in situations which are only imaginable now. It is interesting so see how our current morals and social norms fit with a setting like the one offered in stargate universe. I loved stargate sg1 but the human side of the show was terribly bad. The characters did not evolve and that was ok because Sg1 offered other kind of food thought. Unfortunately it ran out of ideas and the whole Ori thing was less than perfect.

      Atlantis got a bit too involved with the wraith thing...enemies explosions blah blah. sGU, on the other hand deals with the greatest reality of space exploration, it is lonely. That affects people. I am sorry if people evolving their characters is considered a soap for you, but I guess it is good the sci fi genre accommodates both our tastes.

    • (Score: 1) by thoughtlover on Tuesday February 25 2014, @10:17AM

      by thoughtlover (3247) on Tuesday February 25 2014, @10:17AM (#6526) Journal

      SG:U = Soap opera? Strange, because that's what I always got from any other SG show. To each, their own (universe).

      The SG movie-length episodes were cool, but I really liked the 'out of control' feel SG:U had and the main(ish) character's introduction to the ship (via a video game, nonetheless!) was that dream that all nerds have.. Am I right or what??

      I agree, too, that they got to the 'core' of the show's plot elements too quickly, as they had an entire UNIVERSE of possibilities to explore.

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by SpallsHurgenson on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:01PM

    by SpallsHurgenson (656) on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:01PM (#5222)

    There is such a glut of good sci-fi available to fans that it's hard to keep up already. Heck, I never even finished watching the entirety of the the X-Files series, and that's more than a decade back. And I've never even seen an episode of Lost! If I'm looking for something I haven't seen before, I can just dig into the archives of TV and movies from years past and I'll find more than enough entertainment to keep me occupied.

    And it's not as if "new" sci-fi is going to significantly different from what has been presented in the past; the vast majority will be character-driven adventure tales where the "science" part of sci-fi is glossed over so it's practically magic in usage (sadly, the number of "hard" sci-fi that has made it to film or screen can probably be counted on one hand that is missing several fingers). Other than improved visual effects, the overall experience of a sci-fi movie from 1980 and 2010 will be pretty much the same.

    So yeah, I'm not worried about the future of sci-fi when there is such a backlog of excellent stuff to keep me watching until the day I die.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:49PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:49PM (#5247)

      Lucky you: x-files is being remastered in 1080p! Broadcasting on the German television right now.

    • (Score: 5, Interesting) by Grishnakh on Sunday February 23 2014, @07:19PM

      by Grishnakh (2831) on Sunday February 23 2014, @07:19PM (#5284)

      Oh please. While I agree that a Netflix subscription and reruns of Star Trek and X-Files will provide many hours of entertainment, I do want more. One thing that's really fun and interesting about watching older sci-fi shows and movies is to see what people in the past thought the future would look like, and see where they got things right and where they totally screwed up. It gets a little depressing after a while living in the past, only watching stuff from decades in the past, and I want to see what people today think the future will look like, for a fresh view.

      Also, I want more spaceships, dammit. I want to see more movies like Alien and Aliens and movies from that era, with big spaceships and cool corridors. We haven't had much of that in the last couple of decades; it's like we as a race have given up on human space travel altogether, and have resigned ourselves to living on an increasingly polluted world where the institutions of government become more and more corrupt, and we really have no future as a race. Just look at the recent "Terra Nova" TV show for an example of this: rich people live in domes, everyone else lives outside where it's so polluted they need breathing equipment to avoid getting sick, and they try to escape this not by building space habitats or offworld colonies, but instead fleeing to the prehistoric past and starting over. I want to see more sci-fi that emphasizes offworld exploration, and I want it to NOT star fucking Xenu-worshipping Tom Cruise.

      • (Score: 1) by Geotti on Monday February 24 2014, @12:00AM

        by Geotti (1146) on Monday February 24 2014, @12:00AM (#5384) Journal

        If you're into time-travelling movies, I can recommend 95ers [imdb.com] that I've found by accident yesterday.
        Even if the camera and actors are a bit weird at times, the story makes up for it.

  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by lhsi on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:30PM

    by lhsi (711) on Sunday February 23 2014, @05:30PM (#5236) Journal

    There's still not a lot of science fiction shows that are being produced by the major streaming services, but we'll probably see more with the success of Hulu's exclusive U.S. distribution of Misfits or Netflix's Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Doctor Who.

    This summary was on slashdot a few days ago. There someone pointed out that this list of shows was just distribution and not production, so doesn't really have anything to do with streaming companies producing content.

    Also, even though Doctor Who was mentioned in the summary, there seems to be no mention of the BBC model at all, which seems to be working fine after all these years.

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by AgTiger on Sunday February 23 2014, @07:35PM

    by AgTiger (1060) on Sunday February 23 2014, @07:35PM (#5292)
    For those of you who loved any of J. Michael Straczynski's works (Babylon 5, Jeremiah, etc...) you might want to keep an eye out on the new studio that he and Patricia Tallman started: Studio JMS [studiojms.com]
  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by Tempus on Sunday February 23 2014, @07:46PM

    by Tempus (1052) on Sunday February 23 2014, @07:46PM (#5295)

    Jerome Bixby's "The Man From Earth" (2007) is easily the best Sci-fi movie I've ever seen. There are no lasers, no explosions, no visual effects, and no budget to speak of, but it's supremely intelligent science fiction. It has ruined me for all other movies. I've recommended it to several people, but it's hard to get people to give a movie a chance when it doesn't put a lot of money on the screen.

    • (Score: 1) by Sebastopol on Monday February 24 2014, @03:52AM

      by Sebastopol (2909) on Monday February 24 2014, @03:52AM (#5504)

      Check out "Primer". It is modern SciFi that doesn't attempt to appeal to the Big Bang Theory / How I Met Your Mother spoonfed-scifi crowd, nor does it strive to be a hollywood blockbuster like just about every other SciFi movie since Star Wars broke big. (I'm very old.)

      • (Score: 1) by TK on Monday February 24 2014, @06:14PM

        by TK (2760) on Monday February 24 2014, @06:14PM (#6011)

        Plus it's based on two engineers working out of a garage. Something a lot of people (here) can relate to.

        --
        The fleas have smaller fleas, upon their backs to bite them, and those fleas have lesser fleas, and so ad infinitum
  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by PapayaSF on Sunday February 23 2014, @08:08PM

    by PapayaSF (1183) on Sunday February 23 2014, @08:08PM (#5297)

    Far too many science fiction films and TV shows seem to be written by Hollywood types with only the vaguest sense of what science fiction is really about. They now know Philip Dick, but beyond that, it's largely comic books, remakes, and "original" stories that no SF editor of the last 30 years would have bought in written form. But there's tons of great SF out there just begging to be made into movies. Granted, some may need updating to account for ubiquitous computing, but off the top of my head:

    • Fred Pohl's Gateway series would make a great TV series: automated alien ships found in the asteroid belt. Get in one and maybe you'll get a trip to another planet and come back with strange alien riches. Or maybe you'll come back dead, or not at all.
    • E.E. Smith's Lensman books, with some updates, would make a fabulous series of space opera films.
    • Iain M. Banks' Culture World books.
    • Cordwainer Smith's Underpeople stories.
    • Robert Heinlein!
    • Theodore Sturgeon
    • many, many more

    There are many great stories there, and with special effects now affordable, please, let's have some respectful, well-written films and TV shows made from them.

    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by dwywit on Sunday February 23 2014, @11:00PM

      by dwywit (1166) on Sunday February 23 2014, @11:00PM (#5355)

      Hells, yes. Niven's "Known Space" catalogue would keep many cast & crew busy for years, as long as decent writers were involved, AND Tom Cruise wasn't.

      Wasn't Quincy Jones fiddling around with "Ringworld" a few years back?

      --
      They sentenced me to twenty years of boredom
      • (Score: 2, Interesting) by PapayaSF on Monday February 24 2014, @01:52AM

        by PapayaSF (1183) on Monday February 24 2014, @01:52AM (#5436)

        Niven, yes, absolutely.

        There is supposedly a Ringworld mini-series in development. Morgan Freeman is supposedly producing a film of Arthur C. Clarke's Rendezvous With Rama, directed by David Fincher, but it seems to be stuck in development hell. Asimov's Foundation also seems to be stuck in development hell, though personally, I thinks it's an unlikely source for a good film. It's just too talky, and I doubt they could ever cram the sheer sweep of the books into even a mini-series that would make sense to most people.

        • (Score: 1) by TK on Monday February 24 2014, @06:23PM

          by TK (2760) on Monday February 24 2014, @06:23PM (#6024)

          Worse than that, the characters in Foundation keep changing during the centuries that it takes place (as they die). Imaging a big-name actor/actress spending twenty minutes on screen talking about how their actions are irrelevant in the broader scheme of the narrative. That doesn't appeal to Hollywood producer types, IMO.

          I do think it would make for a great mini-series, though.

          --
          The fleas have smaller fleas, upon their backs to bite them, and those fleas have lesser fleas, and so ad infinitum
    • (Score: 1) by TheLink on Monday February 24 2014, @06:59AM

      by TheLink (332) on Monday February 24 2014, @06:59AM (#5623) Journal

      Julian May's Saga of the Exiles would probably need to be a series too. :)
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saga_of_Pliocene_Exi le [wikipedia.org]

      Even had a guidebook:
      http://www.amazon.com/A-Pliocene-Companion-Julian- May/dp/0345322908 [amazon.com]

      But given a lot happens amongst minds it's going to hard to translate to screen. Not so keen on her Galactic Milieu books (which are related and part of the same universe).

      • (Score: 1) by PapayaSF on Monday February 24 2014, @11:58PM

        by PapayaSF (1183) on Monday February 24 2014, @11:58PM (#6292)

        As I recall one of the events in that series was the opening of the straits of Gibraltar and the forming of the Mediterranean Sea. Now, that would be a fun special effect!

        • (Score: 1) by TheLink on Tuesday February 25 2014, @07:10AM

          by TheLink (332) on Tuesday February 25 2014, @07:10AM (#6446) Journal
          Yep! Plenty of good stuff. I think that series is underrated. I find more depth and breadth than many other more popular SciFi stuff (compared to Asimov for example, it's like a full course banquet to a good burger - and I do enjoy a good burger - often more than banquets esp if those are too hard to digest ;) ). While there are plenty of stereotypes/archetypes it's actually a good thing with so many characters and multiple events to keep track of - it's like familiar pieces being used to build something extraordinary.

          Plenty of cool scenes from a film perspective. The Tanu in glowing armor on a Hunt riding on PK levitated chalikos from a glowing city. The Tanu Firvulag festivals/Great Battles. Maybe even a flashback of the Ship's crash and Lugonn/Spear vs Sharn/Sword battle when the Tanu and Firvulag first arrived. The Howlers.
    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by GeriatricGentleman on Monday February 24 2014, @10:35AM

      by GeriatricGentleman (1192) on Monday February 24 2014, @10:35AM (#5722)

      I dunno. I was all ready to leap on the band wagon and add a few other favourites (anyone else remember ABC Warriors from 2000AD presents? fuck me, astounding art (Kevin Roberts?), great humour, weird stories - sigh, I loved it).

      Would be crap on screen though I am sure.

      And much as I love the Culture novels and enjoyed many of the others you've mentioned, I suspect they would be crap too.

      Mind you - I can remember Space 1999 on TV as a kid. We had a B&W TV that got one channel...just. Somehow that show would have me riveted and I would run home to watch it. But in truth, I watched about two minutes of it a couple of years back. It's crap.

      Star Wars? Hmm, 1st movie cool as a kid - rest crap.
      Star Trek? Not to my taste (read: crap)
      Alien, actually ok. Aliens even. The rest? Average to crap.
      I didn't like Babylon5. Or Red Dwarf. Never saw Firefly (I know, I know...I am a heathen).

      Blade Runner. Yep. A good one - but, oddly(?), Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Umm, crap.

      I don't think it is special effects based. Although maybe that makes a difference. They are just stories, but so many of the sci-fi ones have been badly told via a screen I think that perhaps this particular media is more challenging than others.

      Hmm, or maybe I only notice because I care and I see all the failures. Perhaps 90% of ALL things on screen are crap? (even if you don't count the ads!)

      • (Score: 1) by Common Joe on Monday February 24 2014, @11:23AM

        by Common Joe (33) <reversethis-{moc ... 1010.eoj.nommoc}> on Monday February 24 2014, @11:23AM (#5744) Journal

        Perhaps 90% of ALL things on screen are crap?

        I've just about stopped watching TV. When I do, it's usually because I'm the mood for something mindless and IQ dropping. I have a feeling you quoted too low a number.

        • (Score: 2) by VLM on Monday February 24 2014, @06:21PM

          by VLM (445) on Monday February 24 2014, @06:21PM (#6020)

          That's the problem. Moties movie could be cool. Ringo's Posleen series could be cool.

          What we'd actually get is a mish mash of the Star Trek action movie reboot combined with urban audience rewrite of Romeo and Juliette, at an absolute best possible case. Probably worse.

          Better off with a good book than a good book and an awful movie that scares people away from the book.

    • (Score: 1) by tangomargarine on Monday February 24 2014, @03:49PM

      by tangomargarine (667) on Monday February 24 2014, @03:49PM (#5892)

      I would give my eyeteeth to get a TV series version of either of Jack McDevitt's book series. They take a very practical approach to space travel and don't involve hardly any hokey aliens, instead focusing on human motivations conflicting in different ways. Unfortunately a fair amount of the books are spent with people in transit on spaceships sitting around talking, though.

      --
      "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
  • (Score: 1) by dotdotdot on Sunday February 23 2014, @08:24PM

    by dotdotdot (858) on Sunday February 23 2014, @08:24PM (#5302)

    Heroes is getting a brief reboot in 2015.
    http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2014/02/22/n bc-heroes [usatoday.com]

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Camembert on Monday February 24 2014, @04:04AM

    by Camembert (2913) on Monday February 24 2014, @04:04AM (#5515)

    Japanese anime series can be well made but they are nearly always focused on a young teenage audience.
    Imagine delivering an adaptation of for example the Revelation Space book in 26 episodes, close to the source material. Or Hyperion. These are books that are impossible to do justice within one movie, and the SFX are expensive for a whole series. But it could work very well as an anime series that is more ambitious than most.

  • (Score: 2) by unitron on Monday February 24 2014, @04:05AM

    by unitron (70) on Monday February 24 2014, @04:05AM (#5516) Journal

    The Future of Science Fiction Entertainment?

    Simple, really.

    FOX will air the episodes out of order.

    : - (

    --
    something something Slashcott something something Beta something something
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @08:07AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @08:07AM (#5669)

    Lunatics is a new animated series being produced by Anansi Spaceworks which will follow the first true extra-terrestrial colonists in their new life in a Lunar Homestead.

    Made exclusively using free software tools, licensed under the CC BY-SA 3.0.

    http://lunatics.tv/ [lunatics.tv]

  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @08:30AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 24 2014, @08:30AM (#5679)

    An effort to create full-feature anime movie using Open Source software only. The story is based on the Russian fairy tale “Marya Morevnaâ€. It is completely reworked to futuristic high-tech twist with a large amount of technobabble.

    While the license for the whole complete movie is still undecided, all sources will be available under CC BY 3.0.

    http://morevnaproject.org/ [morevnaproject.org]

  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by tangomargarine on Monday February 24 2014, @03:55PM

    by tangomargarine (667) on Monday February 24 2014, @03:55PM (#5899)

    I wouldn't really call Buffy or Doctor Who sci fi...I mean, Buffy has vampires and witches in it. Isn't magic anathema for sci fi?

    And DW is more...space fantasy. Any time there's any technology involved, they usually handwave it with maximum prejudice. (Although that seems to be much worse since the Smith writers took over.) Hell, they had episodes where they built a city on the back of a star whale, and a minotaur was eating the characters' religious beliefs.

    --
    "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by VLM on Monday February 24 2014, @06:26PM

      by VLM (445) on Monday February 24 2014, @06:26PM (#6027)

      "Isn't magic anathema for sci fi?"

      Sadly, for the liberal arts types in charge of the whole thing from start to finish, sufficiently advanced science, say, post 1800 or so, is indistinguishable by them from magic. Combine with a carefully uneducated general populace... you can see the confusion.