Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

SoylentNews is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop. Only 19 submissions in the queue.
posted by girlwhowaspluggedout on Saturday March 01 2014, @11:00AM   Printer-friendly
from the thank-you-mario-but-wireless-connectivity-is-in-another-console dept.

GungnirSniper writes:

"Nintendo has announced the discontinuation of their Wi-Fi Connection Service for the Wii, DS, and DSi systems. Over 400 titles are affected, including Mario Kart Wii. Engadget reports that the services that will keep working on the DS after May include the DSi Shop, DS Browser, and DSi Browser, while the Wii will keep Netflix, Hulu, Wii Shop Channel, Internet Channel, Pay & Play, and YouTube.

Could the slow sales of the Wii U be motivating this move? Will casual gamers be instead put off by this, and hurt the company's future sales?"

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by Debvgger on Saturday March 01 2014, @11:17AM

    by Debvgger (545) on Saturday March 01 2014, @11:17AM (#9058)

    Thank you for reminding me why I'm switching to PC gaming.

    Well, it is also because I'm developing stuff with the Rift and that's clearly the future for gaming :-)

    Tragedy here is, most gamers were deterred from gaming on Nintendo systems because their online support was so weak/weird.

    Also, from a developer's point of view, Nintendo policies on online stuff were so fucking retarded. The last 3DS game I worked on was rejected a ton of times at Nintendo's Lotcheck because we were trying to read stuff from the server (less than 1kb of data) more than the allowed 20 or 25 times PER FIVE MINUTES. Yeah, we needed about 20kb per five minutes and that was TOO FUCKING MUCH. We joked they were using unsold consoles to run the service and that's why it was needed to limit the number of connections. Maybe we were right. Maybe their servers were Beta.

    I wonder if they will reimburse me the extra 600$ the DS dev kit cost with Wifi (yes, you had to buy it as an *expensive* option). Although that was nothing compared with the many hours trying to make it work. I have never seen C code with so many goto statements in my whole life.

    • (Score: 5, Insightful) by TheRaven on Saturday March 01 2014, @12:07PM

      by TheRaven (270) on Saturday March 01 2014, @12:07PM (#9068) Journal
      PC gaming doesn't necessarily help you avoid this. If you're buying a game where the online component is important, then it should have either complete peer-to-peer support, so you can play against friends without needing a central server, or the server software should be available so other people can host it once the original company stops making money from it. I played Quake I online many years after iD stopped caring about it, for example. I largely stopped buying online games once they started requiring you to use the company's servers.
      --
      sudo mod me up
      • (Score: 5, Informative) by Debvgger on Saturday March 01 2014, @12:27PM

        by Debvgger (545) on Saturday March 01 2014, @12:27PM (#9073)

        Yes, that was what I was referring to with PC gaming: To at least have the option to not to use the developer, publisher or whoever else servers if you don't want to. Anything else means soon or later the game is not going to give enough money to maintain a server and die.

        This topic burns me so hard I maybe wrote too fast...

  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by big_e on Saturday March 01 2014, @11:40AM

    by big_e (2513) on Saturday March 01 2014, @11:40AM (#9062)

    I want be able to have the same gaming experience 10 years from now. With games with online components, you can't. Eventually either it will eventually shut down, or they will choose to alter the game in a matter you do not like. If you feel the need to be nostalgic and play WoW as it was before the cataclysm, you can't because Blizzard reserves the right to change the game as they see fit and the ability to experience the game as it was before is gone forever. Older games lack the kill switch. The game industry isn't exactly going to be wanting to keep old games running on an old platform they are unable to monetize as that competes against their current product. Someone playing a game they purchased 5 years ago, or worse yet used and is not generating any subscription revenue represents a lost sale to them.

    Preservation of current games is going to practically impossible as more and more are dependent on a remote server for play.

    • (Score: 4, Insightful) by Debvgger on Saturday March 01 2014, @11:54AM

      by Debvgger (545) on Saturday March 01 2014, @11:54AM (#9065)

      Yeah, well said. But it's not only about being online or offline. I'm sad for the Xbox Halo 2 online being nuked a few years ago. But PC version is still working. The problem here is designing the games in a way that depends on you continuing offering a service or not. All games should come with the option for people to build their own servers if they want.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by mashdar on Saturday March 01 2014, @04:11PM

      by mashdar (3505) on Saturday March 01 2014, @04:11PM (#9146)

      There are private servers for classic WoW. Obviously there needs to be sufficient demand.

      One would hope, if the primary server was being shut down, that a company would release a final patch allowing GUI server selection (no registry, just a text field). Unlikely, but I can dream.

  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by slartibartfastatp on Saturday March 01 2014, @12:50PM

    by slartibartfastatp (588) on Saturday March 01 2014, @12:50PM (#9083) Journal

    There should be some way to do it in a custom server? I guess it would be a terrible amount of work.

  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Khyber on Saturday March 01 2014, @12:58PM

    by Khyber (54) on Saturday March 01 2014, @12:58PM (#9085) Journal

    My Wii plays pretty much only offline games any ways. Charter sucks so bad that only my PC can connect to online games. PS3? Wii? Nope. Not even as the only thing attached to the cable modem (not even a router.)

    --
    Destroying Semiconductors With Style Since 2008, and scaring you ill-educated fools since 2013.
    • (Score: 5, Interesting) by dotdotdot on Saturday March 01 2014, @02:18PM

      by dotdotdot (858) on Saturday March 01 2014, @02:18PM (#9114)

      Online play always worked great for my kids. They play Mario Kart and a couple others online with family out of town. They've been doing it a lot more the last few days since I told them it was going away.

      What really sucks is that it affects the game and not just the console. Even if I were to go out and buy a Wii U, which is backward compatible with Wii games, they would still not work online.

  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by willie3204 on Saturday March 01 2014, @02:06PM

    by willie3204 (826) on Saturday March 01 2014, @02:06PM (#9109)

    I have modded my wii to play Japanese games and use it primarily for Karaoke Joysound Wii [wikipedia.org] and if Nintendo had whacked this service I would have dropped future Ninetndo services like a hot rock.

    What costs could be associated with the wifi service that is worth alienating your customers like this? Someone do maths pls.

  • (Score: 1) by Abominous Salad on Sunday March 02 2014, @04:19AM

    by Abominous Salad (3074) on Sunday March 02 2014, @04:19AM (#9391)

    Nintendo just committed suicide.

    • (Score: 2) by VLM on Sunday March 02 2014, @12:24PM

      by VLM (445) on Sunday March 02 2014, @12:24PM (#9552)

      Wasn't that more like when the Wii U came out, and this is more analogous to decomposition?

      • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Abominous Salad on Monday March 03 2014, @05:26PM

        by Abominous Salad (3074) on Monday March 03 2014, @05:26PM (#10124)

        Perhaps. I know people who adore their Wii U (aside from the dearth of games). I will say this, marketing matters. You couldn't escape the Wii ads back in the day no matter where you hid. I literally never heard about the Wii U except during the trade show news cycles and even that was avoidable in the shadow of Xbox One's DRMGate.

        For me personally, as an observer who admittedly buys consoles anywhere from 5-20 years after they're released (I'm still looking very much forward to Wind Waker), the Wii announcement affects me more, so it was the focus of my hyperbole :)

        To a large extent I assume the Wii U hate is pure trolling from hardcore gamers who go their usual route of, there is One True Way, everything else is awful and you should feel bad for making it. The gamer trolls smelled blood in the earnings and weak marketing, and went full bully with stories that Nintendo's CEO had been told to kill himself if the Wii U failed - stories that float far and wide.

        However, it definitely appears to be fact, that Nintendo's new CEO has never heard of marketing.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 02 2014, @09:37PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 02 2014, @09:37PM (#9753)

    I tap that with my mouse.