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posted by janrinok on Wednesday April 09 2014, @10:14PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the that's-deep-man-deep dept.

It is tempting to think that once we locate the missing Malaysian Airlines MH370 aircraft the answers to what actually happened will surely follow. In the last 48-72 hours both the Chinese and Australians have detected possible 'pings' from the aircraft's data recorders. If it proves to be the missing aircraft, and that is still an 'if', then this offering from long-time member crutchy might help:

This graphic shows the problem that the recovery effort will have to overcome.

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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 09 2014, @10:30PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 09 2014, @10:30PM (#29128)

    * Malaysian

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 09 2014, @10:39PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 09 2014, @10:39PM (#29129)

    Press: Either announce you found the fucking plane or shut the fuck up already.

    • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Wednesday April 09 2014, @10:56PM

      by bob_super (1357) on Wednesday April 09 2014, @10:56PM (#29136)

      CNN doubled their ratings with the wall-to-wall coverage.
      This isn't going away anytime soon, even when someone starts massively stabbing students in a high school...

      Mystery and speculation sell. There are a couple non-news cable channels that would otherwise fold instantly.

      • (Score: 2, Informative) by MostCynical on Thursday April 10 2014, @01:17AM

        by MostCynical (2589) on Thursday April 10 2014, @01:17AM (#29183) Journal

        People don't want information.. They want entertainment.
        And, it seems, nothing entertains like endless specultation.

        http://youarenotsosmart.com/2011/06/10/the-backfir e-effect/ [youarenotsosmart.com]

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confirmation_bias [wikipedia.org]

        --
        "I guess once you start doubting, there's no end to it." -Batou, Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex
      • (Score: 2) by Hairyfeet on Thursday April 10 2014, @03:10AM

        by Hairyfeet (75) <reversethis-{moc ... {8691tsaebssab}> on Thursday April 10 2014, @03:10AM (#29224) Journal

        What I want to know is this...where the fuck is the debris?

        Correct me if I'm wrong but from what i understand those airliners have pretty thin skin and even if the pilot ran the thing out of gas its still gonna hit that water at a pretty good speed, yes? Then you have all that oil and gas, plenty of stuff onboard would float once the plane broke up, from luggage to lifevests...so where in the hell is it?

        Call me Doubting Thomas but I'm having a hard time believing that a plane plowed into the sea and there wasn't shit busted up floating all over the place. A little piper cub? Sure. A military plane made to take damage staying intact? yeah I'd buy that too,but every picture of a plane crash I've ever seen showed debris spread for over a mile as the thing broke apart and even if he put it into a power dive and went in straight wouldn't the wings shear off?

        --
        ACs are never seen so don't bother. Always ready to show SJWs for the racists they are.
        • (Score: 3, Interesting) by umafuckitt on Thursday April 10 2014, @04:10AM

          by umafuckitt (20) on Thursday April 10 2014, @04:10AM (#29245)

          And it may well have broken up and had pieces scattered everywhere. But that region of the ocean is large, hard to access, and has powerful and unpredictable currents. It's quite possible that floating debris is out there and simply has not been found.

        • (Score: 2) by Aighearach on Thursday April 10 2014, @05:02AM

          by Aighearach (2621) on Thursday April 10 2014, @05:02AM (#29265)

          I'm thinking it landed in Kazakhstan, and the people they kept were moved to Iran.

    • (Score: 2) by Tork on Thursday April 10 2014, @03:51AM

      by Tork (3914) on Thursday April 10 2014, @03:51AM (#29239)
      Yeah! They should be live-covering every bowel movement of the Oscar Pistorious case instead!!
      --
      Slashdolt Logic: "24 year old jokes about sharks and lasers are +5, Funny." 💩
  • (Score: 3, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 09 2014, @10:40PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 09 2014, @10:40PM (#29131)

    Or 15,000 feet to our American cousins.

    In context (from TFImage), it's at about the maximum depth that the Alvin submersible can go.

    • (Score: 5, Informative) by Ethanol-fueled on Wednesday April 09 2014, @11:19PM

      by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Wednesday April 09 2014, @11:19PM (#29140) Homepage

      According to this [livescience.com] article, China has submersibles that are rated for 7,000 meters. Coincidentally, a few years ago a place I might know about made underwater sensors that were rated 7KM, custom-made for China, and to comply with ITAR regulations the makers had to cripple the firmware to reduce accuracy and then tamper-proof the electronics so that nobody could pick off the ICs and reverse-engineer their contents.

  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by AnythingGoes on Wednesday April 09 2014, @11:18PM

    by AnythingGoes (3345) on Wednesday April 09 2014, @11:18PM (#29139)
    If the Malaysian authorities say too much - they are scolded for revealing stuff before proper investigation.

    If they say nothing, then they get accused of cover-ups, hiding stuff etc.

    Whichever level of disclosure causes someone to be unhappy.

    Sometimes I understand why we get the politicians we have - it is because the general public cannot understand that some things take time and insist on getting things without understanding context, and then blaming the messenger, so politicians learn to shut up, come up with a witty sound-bite and say nothing substantial!
    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by NCommander on Thursday April 10 2014, @04:33AM

      by NCommander (2) Subscriber Badge <mcasadevall@soylentnews.org> on Thursday April 10 2014, @04:33AM (#29253) Homepage Journal

      No matter what you do, someone will always consider it wrong. The trick is knowing on doing the right thing, understanding the difference between naysayers and those who have a legitimate beef, and not to become insensitive to those around you.

      --
      Still always moving
    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by umafuckitt on Thursday April 10 2014, @04:33AM

      by umafuckitt (20) on Thursday April 10 2014, @04:33AM (#29254)

      I disagree. They've handled this stupidly and dug themselves into the hole they're now in.

      They should have been more assertive much earlier on about the plane having crashed. Air France declared 447 to to be lost ("no hope for survivors" was the term used) on the same day as that on which radar contact was lost. Debris were found the day after this statement. If a large commercial airliner hasn't been reported as landing somewhere by the time fuel has theoretically has run out, then you're pretty safe in making this presumption. There has never been a mid-ocean landing of a large plane with survivors. Instead of taking an assertive position, the Malaysians are still in denial and making daft statements along the "miracles do happen [nbcnews.com]" line.

      The second foolish thing they did is invite the relatives to Malaysia, put them up in a hotel, and brief them at regular intervals. What's the point of that? It stresses out the relatives because they're away from their family support structure. It creates a crass media circus and exposes the relatives to cameras and reporters. It increases the pressure on the authorities to produce a result and so increases the likelihood of them saying stupid shit. There is no useful role for the relatives to play and their presence isn't necessary. There is no useful information the authorities can provide in person that they could not provide some other way, such as sending councillors to these people's houses or towns.

      • (Score: 2) by Reziac on Thursday April 10 2014, @04:40AM

        by Reziac (2489) on Thursday April 10 2014, @04:40AM (#29256) Homepage

        I agree, objectively that would make better sense. Tho I wonder to what degree it's a cultural thing, where rather than make you unhappy, they tell you what you want to hear, or at least sound hopeful rather than be the bearers of bad news.

        [I haven't been following it beyond what shows up here.]

      • (Score: 2) by AnythingGoes on Friday April 11 2014, @09:32AM

        by AnythingGoes (3345) on Friday April 11 2014, @09:32AM (#29935)
        Let's say that you were on the spot, having to make a decision?

        1. Would you affirmatively say that the plane has crashed? - Without knowing for sure what could have happened to it? After all it could have been hijacked, and flown to one of the islands in the South China Sea.. Would you not look like a fool later?

        2. If you don't invite the relatives to Malaysia, then someone will comment that you are being insensitive to the needs of the relatives and that they should have been near just in case the plane was found and their relatives were needed for emotional support.

        What I am trying to say here is that it is easy to make judgement calls when we are not present - but it is very different when you are the person on the spot!
    • (Score: 2, Informative) by Open4D on Thursday April 10 2014, @08:52AM

      by Open4D (371) Subscriber Badge on Thursday April 10 2014, @08:52AM (#29330) Journal

      Point of pedantry ...

      "A Hobson's choice [wikipedia.org] is a free choice in which only one option is offered. As a person may refuse to take that option, the choice is therefore between taking the option or not; "take it or leave it"."

      So maybe instead the Malaysian authorities were between a rock and a hard place and should have chosen the lesser of two evils?

      • (Score: 2) by AnythingGoes on Friday April 11 2014, @09:21AM

        by AnythingGoes (3345) on Friday April 11 2014, @09:21AM (#29929)
        You're right! Looks like I need to pick up some better idioms? ;)
  • (Score: 0, Redundant) by Ken_g6 on Wednesday April 09 2014, @11:33PM

    by Ken_g6 (3706) on Wednesday April 09 2014, @11:33PM (#29148)

    Real deep!

  • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 10 2014, @12:38AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 10 2014, @12:38AM (#29171)

    Nice infographic crutchy!

    Do any of us qualify to be called "long-time member"?

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 10 2014, @06:28AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 10 2014, @06:28AM (#29301)

    Funny coincidence http://macedoniaonline.eu/content/view/24972/56/ [macedoniaonline.eu]

    • (Score: 2) by wonkey_monkey on Thursday April 10 2014, @08:01AM

      by wonkey_monkey (279) on Thursday April 10 2014, @08:01AM (#29318) Homepage

      Funny coincidence

      I don't see that it's either of those things.

      --
      systemd is Roko's Basilisk
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 10 2014, @08:33AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 10 2014, @08:33AM (#29323)

      I'm not sure that's how patents work in big corps. It's usually a condition of the employment contract that all IP rights are assigned to the employer. Some of these guys might have been listed as inventors (or co-inventors), but Free scale the company will own the patent and its rights.

      • (Score: 2) by Open4D on Thursday April 10 2014, @08:43AM

        by Open4D (371) Subscriber Badge on Thursday April 10 2014, @08:43AM (#29327) Journal

        And even if the patent rights were held by the individuals personally, wouldn't those rights by part of their estate [wikipedia.org] and thus be passed on to the heirs?

  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by Open4D on Thursday April 10 2014, @08:12AM

    by Open4D (371) Subscriber Badge on Thursday April 10 2014, @08:12AM (#29321) Journal

    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-269567 98 [bbc.com]

    At the top of that article is a map of the ocean floor. But ...

    The thick bands indicate tracks surveyed by modern acoustic echosounders, which map a swath of area along the path of the ship, and these are very accurate (to about 2%).

    The thin tracks indicate older, low-tech echosoundings, which are not as reliable. They are, though, "direct" measurements.

    That cannot be said for everything else you see. This is mapping conducted by satellites that infer the shape of the ocean bottom from the shape of the water surface above.

    • (Score: 5, Interesting) by rts008 on Thursday April 10 2014, @09:02AM

      by rts008 (3001) on Thursday April 10 2014, @09:02AM (#29333)

      That is a far more interesting article than the link in the summary.

      I found this to be an interesting point:

      One estimate suggested it would take a ship, fitted with a modern swath-mapping echosounder system, about 200 years to map the entire ocean floor in high resolution.

      Put that another way: it would take 20 dedicated ships 10 years to do the same task. This could be achieved for about $3bn. It sounds a lot of money, but it's the kind of investment we make when we go to Saturn or Jupiter with a big orbiting spacecraft to map those planets and their moons.

      Hmm....food for thought...

      I think it could be done for less than $3bn.

      'Crowd Source' it(well, sort of...) by having interested nations/gov't.s/whatever fund/offer incentives(reduced tariffs or port fees or something like that) for that vessel to have the needed equipment installed to cover routes that would enable mapping of the entire global sea beds. Include military vessels that travel other routes, fishing vessels, etc.(think outside the box and 'traditional' methods!)
      Set up standards for data collection and processing, and crunch data ala 'seti at home', 'folding protein at home', etc.
      Add it to Google Earth/Maps and similar.

      Just some thoughts... *disclaimer: this is way out of my field, so I may be overlooking the obvious to those 'in the field'