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posted by janrinok on Thursday May 01 2014, @04:14PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the at-a-price dept.

SanDisk and Samsung have announced 19nm server-grade SSDs at impressive capacities or impressive speeds (but not both at the same time). In particular, SanDisk has unveiled the 4 TB Optimus MAX, a 2.5" solid-state drive (SSD) packed with 19nm eMLC flash, connected via 6 Gbit/sec SAS. The Optimus MAX is rated for 75,000 random read IOPS, 15,000 random write IOPS, and 400 MB/sec sequential read and write.

For those who would prefer speed and endurance over capacity, SanDisk also announced the Lightning Ultra Gen. II SSDs. With capacities of 200/400/800GB, these drives employ a SAS 12Gb/s interface and are rated at up to 1000/600 MB/s (4KB sequential read/write) and up to 190K/100K random read/write IOPS.

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World's Largest Capacity Storage Drive Announced: It's a 15.36 Terabyte SSD 47 comments

We have previously run stories about 2 TB, 4 TB, and 6 TB Solid State Drives (SSDs) and their seemingly inevitable but gradual increase in capacity over time. Samsung just announced a HUGE increase in drive capacity, leap-frogging all other storage devices out there — including spinning hard disk storage [takyon: a 6 TB 2.5" drive already leapfrogs spinning disk]!

Ars Technica is reporting that Samsung unveils 2.5-inch 16TB SSD: The world's largest hard drive. The third-generation 3D V-NAND is now up to 48 TLC layers and 256Gbit per die. From the article:

At the Flash Memory Summit in California, Samsung has unveiled what appears to be the world's largest hard drive—and somewhat surprisingly, it uses NAND flash chips rather than spinning platters. The rather boringly named PM1633a, which is being targeted at the enterprise market, manages to cram almost 16 terabytes into a 2.5-inch SSD package. By comparison, the largest conventional hard drives made by Seagate and Western Digital currently max out at 8 or 10TB.

The secret sauce behind Samsung's 16TB SSD is the company's new 256Gbit (32GB) NAND flash die; twice the capacity of 128Gbit NAND dies that were commercialised by various chip makers last year. To reach such an astonishing density, Samsung has managed to cram 48 layers of 3-bits-per-cell (TLC) 3D V-NAND into a single die. This is up from 24 layers in 2013, and then 36 layers in 2014.

Though claimed capacity is 16 TB, actual available storage is 15.36 TB (providing 640 GB of over provisioning.) The drive is 15mm high so it is geared to the enterprise market; it probably won't fit in your laptop where 9.5mm is an unofficial standard.

In case you were wondering, by some estimates this capacity is enough to store 1.5 copies of the uncompressed textual data in the print collection of the US Library of Congress (LoC).

It boggles my mind to consider such large storage capacities. Given the global population is about 8.3 billion, just one of these drives would be sufficient to store 1.8 KiB on every human being on the planet, never mind an entire rack of these drives.

What practical use is there for such capacities? What would you do with one (or more) of these? How would this fit into your "Big Data" application?


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  • (Score: 3, Funny) by dublet on Thursday May 01 2014, @04:46PM

    by dublet (2994) on Thursday May 01 2014, @04:46PM (#38547)

    I can't wait to loose that much data without warning in one go!
     
     
    (Not having a good time with some other SanDisk products at the moment.)

    • (Score: 2) by mhajicek on Thursday May 01 2014, @05:04PM

      by mhajicek (51) on Thursday May 01 2014, @05:04PM (#38553)

      This is different from HDDs how?

      --
      The spacelike surfaces of time foliations can have a cusp at the surface of discontinuity. - P. Hajicek
      • (Score: 4, Informative) by Taibhsear on Thursday May 01 2014, @05:11PM

        by Taibhsear (1464) on Thursday May 01 2014, @05:11PM (#38554)

        Exactly. I just had a drive controller crap out on me the other day. No SMART data warnings of any problems. POOF, gone. Thankfully it wasn't important content.
        (ran out of mod points or I'd mod up)

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 02 2014, @04:41AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 02 2014, @04:41AM (#38740)

          "Thankfully it wasn't important content."

          Oh those things.

      • (Score: 2) by tynin on Thursday May 01 2014, @05:16PM

        by tynin (2013) on Thursday May 01 2014, @05:16PM (#38555) Journal

        See, with HDD's, you often get a clicking sound before the drive fails in a specific scenario. Which is of course of supremely useful when dealing with racks and racks of spinning disks.... and of course the time honored tradition to put a failing HDDs into the freezer... or was it the oven, to attempt to temporarily revive it long enough to copy off your data. Surely that won't work for SSDs.

        I suppose their is likely scenario's in which HDD's fail that are better than SSD's, but if you aren't backing up your data, you are doing it wrong. Pull the failing drive, and either let the RAID rebuild, or restore from backup.

      • (Score: 2) by quitte on Thursday May 01 2014, @05:51PM

        by quitte (306) on Thursday May 01 2014, @05:51PM (#38578) Journal

        Since I moved into a tiny appartement I didn't have the space to put my computer in a safe place. This resulted in a lot of jolts to the case. Of course the computer developed symptoms: it got slow. After about 2 years it got so bad that I kept thinking it was crashing a lot.

        Only after I exchanged the HDD was I sure that it was to blame. The problems disappeared and I wasn't able to get all the data off the faulty drive.

        SMART didn't see any problems no matter what.

        • (Score: 1) by wintersolstice on Thursday May 01 2014, @07:38PM

          by wintersolstice (4273) on Thursday May 01 2014, @07:38PM (#38617)

          Same here, I've had quite a few drives fail on me over the last couple years - all spinning disk, never an error or clicking noise or anything.

          Just one day it works, the next day it wouldn't spin up at all (try as it might). Technology changes, but the fact remains the same. You're only as good as your last good backup.

      • (Score: 1) by citizenr on Thursday May 01 2014, @09:25PM

        by citizenr (2737) on Thursday May 01 2014, @09:25PM (#38656)

        hdd will more often drop few bad sectors than simply VANISH WITHOUT ANY WARNING like every single SSD does.

    • (Score: 5, Funny) by EvilSS on Thursday May 01 2014, @05:50PM

      by EvilSS (1456) Subscriber Badge on Thursday May 01 2014, @05:50PM (#38577)

      Someday someone is going to figure out a method of having data in two places at once, on independent storage devices. That way if one fails, you won't lose all your data. When that happens, that person is going to be a fucking billionaire overnight!

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 01 2014, @07:04PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 01 2014, @07:04PM (#38610)
      Faster drives allow you to do backups faster.
    • (Score: 2) by SlimmPickens on Friday May 02 2014, @01:23AM

      by SlimmPickens (1056) on Friday May 02 2014, @01:23AM (#38712)

      I can't wait to loose that much data without warning in one go!

      I suspect you have several networked computers in your home, are capable of working your way through a backup script or setting up one of the many free backup tools, and can afford extra disks and an account at rsync.net. Why woud you loose any data in one go?

      • (Score: -1, Redundant) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 02 2014, @02:38AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 02 2014, @02:38AM (#38725)


        I can't wait to looose that much data without warning in one go!

        I suspect you have several networked computers in your home, are capable of working your way through a backup script or setting up one of the many free backup tools, and can afford extra disks and an account at rsync.net. Why woud you looose any data in one go?

        FTFY
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 04 2014, @11:13PM

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