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posted by NCommander on Monday June 02 2014, @12:15AM   Printer-friendly
from the not-this-crap-again dept.

Ars Technica How the patent trolls won in Congress

Trial lawyers are heavy donors to Democratic politicians, including Reid. A Washington Post article on Reid's fundraising during his 2010 campaign noted big-money fundraisers taking place at a Florida trial lawyer's home, as well as one held in California by the top securities class-action law firm, now named Robins Geller Rudman & Dowd.

They weren't the only ones lobbying against this bill, which was a first-of-its-kind proposal aimed squarely at "patent trolls." Universities and invention promotion groups like Edison Nation were vocal throughout the process, and Leahy noted the university opposition in his statement killing the bill. Companies that rely on heavy patent licensing as part of their business, including Qualcomm and Dolby, lobbied through the Innovation Alliance.

While those groups may celebrate the end of this bill, they weren't able to orchestrate the political shutdown that occurred Wednesday. "They were active throughout the entire process, but they don't have that kind of money, power, and juice," said the tech sector lobbyist. "This was entirely done by the pharmaceutical industry and the trial lawyers."

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  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Angry Jesus on Monday June 02 2014, @12:32AM

    by Angry Jesus (182) on Monday June 02 2014, @12:32AM (#50042)

    This guy thinks the trial lawyers over-played their hand. [mcbeedigital.com] That if the republicans take the senate this year they will push through something much stronger than the compromise that was on the table before Reid killed it.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 02 2014, @03:00AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 02 2014, @03:00AM (#50063)

      I hold out little hope for the GOP to do the right thing. They have time and again show they can be sold to the highest bidder just like the DNC. Just watch the money shift coffers. The people who want bills passed do not bet on the loosers. They bribe the winners. With the caps off all donations pretty much at this point we aint seen nothing yet...

    • (Score: 2) by starcraftsicko on Monday June 02 2014, @04:53AM

      by starcraftsicko (2821) on Monday June 02 2014, @04:53AM (#50080) Journal

      Oh, I'll agree that the GOP will be anxious to have it their way if they control the US Senate, but I doubt they'll have the needed super-majority to steamroll. The GOP aren't the only ones obstructing in DC.

      --
      This post was created with recycled electrons.
  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by quacking duck on Monday June 02 2014, @12:39AM

    by quacking duck (1395) on Monday June 02 2014, @12:39AM (#50044)

    Universities [...] were vocal throughout the process, and Leahy noted the university opposition in his statement killing the bill

    Remember this the next time you receive a donation request from your alma mater.

    • (Score: 2) by Nerdfest on Monday June 02 2014, @12:58AM

      by Nerdfest (80) on Monday June 02 2014, @12:58AM (#50048)

      That's actually the best idea I've heard in ages.

    • (Score: 1) by moondoctor on Monday June 02 2014, @01:42AM

      by moondoctor (2963) on Monday June 02 2014, @01:42AM (#50055)

      institutions that are supposed to be the pinnacle of learning are opposed to reforming a dysfunctional copyright system that many believe holds back innovation.

      my brain hurts just thinking about it.

      • (Score: 3, Insightful) by dry on Monday June 02 2014, @06:07AM

        by dry (223) on Monday June 02 2014, @06:07AM (#50101) Journal

        It's what happens when they're forced to find there own funding and given limited choices.

      • (Score: 2, Interesting) by anubi on Monday June 02 2014, @07:22AM

        by anubi (2828) on Monday June 02 2014, @07:22AM (#50112) Journal
        The way things are going, going to University to learn Engineering would be like going to University to learn organic meth synthesis...

        While the latter is illegal, the former is teaching people how stuff works... threatening copyright and patent.

        Remember when it was the Religions which wanted to restrict the ability of the people to read the Word of God ( Insert Name of Holy Book here ) for themselves... and make what they would out of it? They, too, did not want their precious cargo out of the bag... Geez, what happens if people read that stuff and discover they no longer require the priest to cement their relationship to their maker ( or, worse yet, discover the priest was just blowing wind, and the Holy Book was just a contrived tool of the elite used to subjugate the masses... )?

        Each of us has to prove all things to himself, and hold fast that which is good.
        --
        "Prove all things; hold fast that which is good." [KJV: I Thessalonians 5:21]
    • (Score: 2) by NCommander on Monday June 02 2014, @01:47PM

      by NCommander (2) Subscriber Badge <michael@casadevall.pro> on Monday June 02 2014, @01:47PM (#50208) Homepage Journal

      The problem is universities (colleges for Americans) operate almost universally on a for-profit basis. Even if they were classified as 501(c)(3)'s, and limited in what they could use their money for, I'm pretty sure you'd still get the end result. What we need is a new type of classification for public institutions to end this kind of BS, which limit the amount of control a university has over their students, as well as ensuring their funding goes for classes/professors/university improvements, and not building huge commercial complexes to bring in more money [wikipedia.org]

      I do feel that universities help a fair number of people reach their goals in lifes, and higher education remains important for many fields, but the cost of said education is so high, you either succeed then spend the next 10 years in debt, or fail, and spend the rest of your life in debt (a friend of mine has been paying off college loans for 8-ish years at this point).

      I dropped out after flunking CS (I was a criminal justice major my junior year) and found a well paying engineering job due to some very unique circumstances, but I know I'm an outer in this regard.

      --
      Still always moving