Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

posted by azrael on Monday September 29 2014, @02:55AM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the lifetime-of-regret dept.

Rachel Feltman writes in the Washington Post that if you've never gotten a tattoo, you might think that a tattoo needle works by "injecting" ink under the skin which is true, but doesn't tell the whole story. Tattoo artists don't simply inject ink from some chamber in the machine into your skin. They dip the needles into pots of ink, the same way another artist would dip a brush. The ink is actually held between the needles and the purpose is the needles is to puncture the skin. "There are hundreds of tiny holes leading down to your dermis — the layer of skin between the epidermis (outer layer) and subcutaneous tissues — the ink between the needles is drawn into them by capillary action," writes Kyle Hill. "In short, the surface tension and forces holding the ink together encourages the ink to seep into the holes left by the needles."

So how does tattoo removal work? Although dermabrasion (where skin is "sanded" to remove the surface and middle layers), cryosurgery (where the area is frozen prior to its removal), and excision (where the dermatologic surgeon removes the tattoo with a scalpel and closes the wound with stitches) were the preferred methods before the 1980s, today lasers have become the standard treatment for tattoo removal because they offer a bloodless, low risk, effective alternative with minimal side effects. The type of laser used to remove a tattoo depends on the tattoo's pigment colors. (Yellow and green are the hardest colors to remove; blue and black are the easiest.) By producing short pulses of intense light that pass harmlessly through the top layers of the skin to be selectively absorbed by the tattoo pigment, the laser energy causes the tattoo pigment to fragment into smaller particles that are then removed by the body's immune system. Side effects of laser procedures are generally few but may include hyperpigmentation, or an abundance of color in the skin at the treatment site, and hypopigmentation, where the treated area lacks normal skin color. Other possible side effects include infection of the site, lack of complete pigment removal and a 5 percent chance of permanent scarring.

According to John Tierney the choice to get a tattoo that is later regretted is related to the end-of-history illusion, in which people tend to “underestimate how much they will change in the future.” Teenagers and adults of all ages know that their tastes have changed regularly over the years before the current moment, but believe that their tastes will somehow not continue to grow and mature in the future. As a result, they wrongly believe that any tattoo that appeals to them today will always appeal to them in the future.

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
  • (Score: 2) by EvilJim on Monday September 29 2014, @03:24AM

    by EvilJim (2501) on Monday September 29 2014, @03:24AM (#99442) Journal

    Unsure what the name of it was but it was a New Zealand production, interviewing ex/current inmates about gang/prison tattoo culture, one guy explained how they made their own ink in there, burn the sole of a shoe/boot, crumble the remains into a container, add a bit of urine, spit or any other liquid, mix and go to town with an old cassette tape motor powered device. gross, and his face was completely blue/black - I wonder how many infections he had to have treated? I once built a nice brass version of the prison tattoo machine for a mate, he ended up digging a trench in his friends arm as he hadn't adjusted the needle to the correct depth. glad I didn't let him try it on me.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 29 2014, @03:38AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 29 2014, @03:38AM (#99444)

    The first person to come up with a tattoo removal process that is relatively fast and easy is going to be a billionaire. All the kids getting tattoos now in their teens and 20s are going to be feeling a lot less enthusiastic about those decisions that are now on their "permanent record." Especially the ones that got fat and now their tattoos look really messed up.

    • (Score: 2) by EvilJim on Monday September 29 2014, @03:39AM

      by EvilJim (2501) on Monday September 29 2014, @03:39AM (#99446) Journal

      You didn't mention 'painless' so I vote for a belt sander. who's going first?

      • (Score: 2) by q.kontinuum on Monday September 29 2014, @06:44AM

        by q.kontinuum (532) on Monday September 29 2014, @06:44AM (#99489) Journal

        Ok, let's add (virtually) painless. A sniper and a barrel of hydrochloric acid, maybe?

        --
        Registered IRC nick on chat.soylentnews.org: qkontinuum
    • (Score: 1) by Ethanol-fueled on Monday September 29 2014, @03:58AM

      by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Monday September 29 2014, @03:58AM (#99453) Homepage

      When I was 18 and fresh out of basic training I got a tattoo of an intoxicated Pink Panther passed out holding a jug of liquor.

      I don't regret it one bit. But then again, I follow Brian Setzer's golden rule of tattoos:

      " Don't get any tattoos where a judge can see them. "

      One a somewhat related note, a guy I was in basic training with already had a tattoo of a naked lady on his arm. They told him that, if he wanted to stay in the service, he had to get the tattoo removed on his own dime. They actually deducted some money from his paycheck until it was paid off, and much of his arm was scabbed over as a result of the removal process.

    • (Score: 2) by keplr on Monday September 29 2014, @04:03AM

      by keplr (2104) on Monday September 29 2014, @04:03AM (#99454) Journal

      Culture is going to swing the other way, most likely. Employers will simply be unable to hire anyone if they stick to their "no tattoos" rule. I don't have any tattoos myself, and never will, but I wouldn't hold it against someone. It's a silly thing to discriminate against in 2014.

      I don't understand the entire body modification subculture. It seems like a variation of self-harm that is just somewhat condoned by society. It does me no harm, though, so I'm fine to leave people to it.

      --
      I don't respond to ACs.
      • (Score: 3, Insightful) by c0lo on Monday September 29 2014, @04:58AM

        by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Monday September 29 2014, @04:58AM (#99467) Journal

        I don't understand the entire body modification subculture. It seems like a variation of self-harm that is just somewhat condoned by society.

        As weird as it looks, it seems to me it wouldn't be a first.
        The same seems to apply to education lately: getting an understanding (of what you learn) is no longer the primary goal, obtaining the graduation paper replaced that; which paper only guarantees that you could take the pain of getting through the process of being "educated" (more correct terms: conditioned by training and tamed by the loans you took).

        --
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
      • (Score: 4, Interesting) by VLM on Monday September 29 2014, @12:26PM

        by VLM (445) Subscriber Badge on Monday September 29 2014, @12:26PM (#99548)

        "Employers will simply be unable to hire anyone if they stick to their "no tattoos" rule."

        Locally it seems to be a requirement if you want to be hired for face to face customer service to have tattoos. Maybe this varies by region.

        Its a conformity thing. Everyone my age (who could afford it or wasn't a weirdo non-conformist) has tattoos, and big corporations find it easier to control or manage people who are deeply conformist, so yeah, tattoo people are preferentially hired.

        I mean, think about it from the point of view of a business:

        1) Folks without tats could be too poor (for even prison tats?). Anyway ask any neocon small business owner with fox news 24x7 playing in his waiting room what he thinks morally and ethically about poor people vs a guy who obviously dropped thousands on tats

        2) Folks without tats could be non-conformist (thats me). Again, ask any true party paladin dead-ender if they think mindless conformity is great.

        3) Really old people have stereotypes where they don't like tattoo people but they're poor now (see #1) because of downsizing / housing bubble / stock market or lets just be honest, they're dying off of old age, either way they just don't matter any more.

        Something I can only say online is I think most tattoos are really ugly. This is a forbidden thought crime, but unfortunately true. Conceptually if I could stamp a nice piece of fine art that I like on my ass that was aesthetically appealing with skin as a background, MAYBE I'd do it. I wouldn't discourage my family members, anyway. HOWEVER the unavoidable fact is that the same people who think velvet elvis and dale earnhardt collectibles are the absolute pinnacle of fine art, are not going to miraculously have good taste when they select their tattoos. By fine art I don't mean it "has" to be centuries old dead white euro men as the artist, there's ton's of stuff thats awesome, but I do mean it has to look better and mean more than some grade school art project doodlings (I've seen some really awful tats). Also from a dirty old man perspective a woman covered with really bad art doesn't look naked when she's naked, psychologically, "take that ugly thing off and let me get a look at all of you, oh whoops that's a tat, sorry". Sorry ladies but again its the truth, most tats I've seen, both in general and on human female flesh, just don't look GOOD when on human female flesh.

        Aesthetically its just like refrigerator doors covered with junk, would it look better without, well then don't apply it, its not rocket science.

        • (Score: 3, Informative) by LoRdTAW on Monday September 29 2014, @02:10PM

          by LoRdTAW (3755) on Monday September 29 2014, @02:10PM (#99582) Journal

          Huh?
          I find it just the opposite but of course, it varies. Older corporate types don't like tatoo people. They view them as ugly and unprofessional. A coworker has full sleeves, ear plugs and a beard (He also lives in the gym). When they promoted him to engineer he had to remove his ear plugs, shave his beard and wear a long sleeve shirt to cover his tattoos. We are given company shirts with a logo, by default everyone has short sleeves save for the president and the manager. He is forced to wear long sleeves to cover his arms. They did lighten up and allow him to regrow his beard but he has to keep it short and neat.

          Places of work who don't care are more modern places that are headed by younger people. My brother works for a high end web developer and they dont care how you look or dress, they only care about your work. They work in the same office as a big marketing agency and they also don't mind how people look or dress. And none of them seem to care about conformity or preferring tattoos. They just want to see your work and if you can produce.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 29 2014, @03:00PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 29 2014, @03:00PM (#99610)

          Anyway ask any neocon small business owner with fox news 24x7 playing in his waiting room what he thinks morally and ethically about poor people vs a guy who obviously dropped thousands on tats
          Dude that was the best agism rant I have read in months. /sarc...

          When you grow up (maybe you are older, but have not grown up). You will see that others have different views than you. Most small business owners have a clue that people with tattoos lower repeat business (where you make real money). They may not even care about the TV in the front room. But they know they serve a mostly 'conservative' crowd and they enjoy watching that garbage. They want repeat business. Not political statements. Any business that does not give their customers what the need and want are usually quickly out of business in 1-2 years.

          Like it or not people are judged by how they look. Dont judge a book by its cover and all that, but we do. Even you did it with your 'fox news' comment. You pre judged someone because of what they had on tv. In a service business you have about 3 seconds for someone to make up their minds about you. If you are covered head to toe in tattoos with crap that someone may not believe in they are going to judge you. Just as you judged a business by what they had on tv (maybe one of the other customers put it on? or maybe they have to listen to the stupid TV far longer than you are there).

          But basically if you dress the part of a heroin junkie you will get treated as one. Much like little girls who dress like sluts suddenly find they get treated like one. Then dont understand because 'all their friends/group does it'. Then yell 'dont judge me'. Sorry thats life.

          You may be covered head to toe in tattoos and do savant level of work. But I can not put you in front of my customers. THEY will judge you and I do not get the business because you had poor impulse control a few years ago. If they thought only tattooed covered people can do this job I would put you there.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 29 2014, @06:17PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 29 2014, @06:17PM (#99706)

          Marry a little/young girl child. They don't got tattoos. Might even be nice to you.
          Was good enough for moses' men.

    • (Score: 2) by black6host on Monday September 29 2014, @04:52AM

      by black6host (3827) on Monday September 29 2014, @04:52AM (#99465) Journal

      I think we might have more success in coming up with a tattoo ink that is easily "neutralized" as opposed to a better method to remove current inks. My first tattoo, which I did myself, was done with thread wrapped around a sewing needle and dipped into India ink. That was over 40 years ago and it's just as much there as it was the day I did it. Not much chance of that going away, particularly given where I placed it. (Minds out of the gutter, please :) )

      Perhaps they started down that road, as the last tattoo I got was close to 8 years ago. But it wasn't something offered back then.

      And I've no regrets over the ink I've gotten over the years. And speaking of belt sanders, don't get a gang tattoo if you ever plan on leaving. Assuming they let you leave you won't leave with the tattoo and the method used to remove it can be quite painful.. Think of sander, hot iron to burn it off you, etc. Quick and effective, yes. Painful, very much so.

      • (Score: 2) by EvilJim on Monday September 29 2014, @05:07AM

        by EvilJim (2501) on Monday September 29 2014, @05:07AM (#99469) Journal

        I once tried something similar in first year high school, used biro pen ink - not smart I know (now)... started with red, that was still going strong after three months, decided I wanted to change it to black... did that and the whole lot disappeared after 2 weeks. hardly even scar showing these days, you can see the faintest lighter toned bottom of a circle but nothing else. I'm guessing I didn't go deep enough. I also got annoyed with the needle not going in very well so just kinda took a 'thwack' at it like you see with movie style injections... stuck the pin halfway through the web between thumb and forefinger, ached for a while... lol, stupid kids.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 29 2014, @10:07AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 29 2014, @10:07AM (#99521)

      Couldn't they just use that ink you use in pens which you then can erase with an erasure pen? Then when you want to erase that tattoo, you just get tattooed with the eraser liquid.

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by VLM on Monday September 29 2014, @12:38PM

      by VLM (445) Subscriber Badge on Monday September 29 2014, @12:38PM (#99549)

      "relatively fast and easy"

      Welcome to 2014, now we have lasers

      "All the kids getting tattoos now"

      So I hear you're from 1985. This is an interesting topic but wait till you hear about this "internet" thing, and the "iphone". On the bad side we have a new eternal world war in the middle east, and even worse, reality TV now exists.

      Seriously though, I've been hearing this continuously since before I was a teen, so there's no shortage of 40-to-50-somethings with really bad art out there. You don't have to wait 30 years for today's kids to age, just ask the kids to look at their parents (grandparents?).

      This might eventually end "conformity means I get a tattoo" in teenagers and young adults, when grannie has a tramp stamp I'm not thinking her teen granddaughter will think its cool anymore just for the grannie reason alone. "Oh grandma, I don't want a tattoo parlor gift certificate for my 18th birthday, tattoos and email are for old people"

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 30 2014, @04:47AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 30 2014, @04:47AM (#99899)

        "All the kids getting tattoos now"

        So I hear you're from 1985.
        ...
        there's no shortage of 40-to-50-somethings with really bad art out there

        Are you drunk? Either a lot more people are getting tattoos now or they aren't, but you can't have it both ways in the same damn post.

      • (Score: 2) by mcgrew on Tuesday September 30 2014, @07:31PM

        by mcgrew (701) <publish@mcgrewbooks.com> on Tuesday September 30 2014, @07:31PM (#100096) Homepage Journal

        Seriously though, I've been hearing this continuously since before I was a teen, so there's no shortage of 40-to-50-somethings with really bad art out there.

        Indeed, I know several personally. Hell, my dad got one during the Korean War, although his was far more artful than the ones I see on middle aged guys today.

        Personally, I've always thought that tattoos were stupid. My youngest daughter has several large ones (she's 27).

        --
        Free Martian whores! [mcgrewbooks.com]