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posted by janrinok on Friday March 20 2015, @02:31AM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the job-creation dept.

Joe Nocera writes in The New York Times that a forthcoming biography “Becoming Steve Jobs,” is leading readers to re-evaluate the “stagnant stereotypes” of Jobs that have only grown stronger after his death. According to the stereotypes, “Steve was a genius with a flair for design,” whose powers of persuasion were such that he could convince people that the sun rose in the west and set in the east. On the other hand, he was also “a pompous jerk,” who humiliated employees and “disregarded everyone else in his single-minded pursuit of perfection.”

It is Schlender’s and Tetzeli’s contention that Jobs was a far more complex and interesting man than the stereotype, and a good part of their book is an attempt to craft a more rounded portrait. According to Nocera the callow, impetuous, arrogant youth who co-founded Apple was very different from the mature and thoughtful man who returned to his struggling creation and turned it into a company that made breathtaking products while becoming the dominant technology company of our time.

How did a young man so reckless and arrogant that he was exiled from the company he founded become the most effective visionary business leader of our time, ultimately transforming the daily life of billions of people? For Schlender and Tetzeli, the crucial period was the most overlooked part of Jobs’s career: The years from 1985 to 1997, when he was in exile from Apple and running NeXT. Equally important, Jobs also owned Pixar, the animation studio he bought from George Lucas. It took years before Pixar came out with its first full-length movie, “Toy Story.” During that time, Jobs saw how Ed Catmull, Pixar’s president, managed the company’s creative talent. Catmull taught Jobs how to manage employees.

"When Jobs returned to Apple, he was more patient — with people and with products. His charisma still drew people to him, but he no longer drove them away with his abrasive behavior and impossible demands. He had also learned that his ideas weren’t always the right ones, and he needed to listen to others." Perhaps the most important example of this was the App Store. Jobs had initially opposed allowing outside developers to build apps for the iPhone, but he did a quick about-face once he realized he was wrong. "Jobs has long been hailed as one of the great creative minds of modern business," concludes Nocera. "He was [also] a great manager. You can’t build a great company if you aren’t one."

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  • (Score: 4, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @02:35AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @02:35AM (#160239)

    Hugh discovered "paragraph". :)

    • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Ethanol-fueled on Friday March 20 2015, @02:46AM

      by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Friday March 20 2015, @02:46AM (#160244) Homepage

      You know what I wish was not discovered? Multiculturalism. The misguided and idiotic notion that you could bring fourteenth-century barbarians into your peaceful and utopic society and expect them to bathe, or not to rape everything (including goats) with vaginas, or form enclaves and alcoves which serve simultaneously as natural history museums and bad parts of town to be avoided.

      Multiculturalism has nothing to do with skin color or geographic origin, although people frequently confound two or three of them. What is has everything to do with is a condescending, patronizing, and infantilizing forced attempt of a reconciliation of guilt felt when the forebrain feels its own internal guilt for the base urges and actions stemming from the hindbrain. People with less discord between the two acknowledge the harsh reality and keep barbarians at arm's length, but those who were taught to loathe the natural order of things live in discord and contradiction, believing they can find peace in literally trying to force everything together.

      There is only one thing savages understand -- the fist. If they don't want to live with the open hand, then they shall die by the fist.

         

      • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @02:54AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @02:54AM (#160248)

        or not to rape everything (including goats) with vaginas

        fucking goats is wrong? it's not rape if they want it

        There is only one thing savages understand -- the fist. If they don't want to live with the open hand, then they shall die by the fist.

        we are doing that with drone strikes. maybe mecha suits next -- it's not 'boots on the ground'!

    • (Score: 5, Informative) by martyb on Friday March 20 2015, @02:57AM

      by martyb (76) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 20 2015, @02:57AM (#160249) Journal

      Breaking NEWS!!!

      Hugh discovered "paragraph". :)

      Sadly, not quite the case; here's the original submission [soylentnews.org].

      While I was performing a 'second-edit' of stories slated to go out, I noticed a wall-of-text and may have tossed in a paragraph element or two. ;)

      --
      Wit is intellect, dancing.
      • (Score: 5, Insightful) by tomp on Friday March 20 2015, @04:01AM

        by tomp (996) on Friday March 20 2015, @04:01AM (#160261)

        Yay, thank you!

        And yes, a big Yay! to Hugh too. Paragraphs or not, he's helping.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @06:32AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @06:32AM (#160284)

        You do good work, marty.

      • (Score: 2, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @07:43AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @07:43AM (#160290)

        On the other site, Slashcode|(the /. editors?) would only put the 1st paragraph of a summary on the front page.
        To see anything past the 1st paragraph break, you had to go to the page for the story.
        This was the way it was done for many years and only recently changed there.

        It made for the bad practice of submitters trying to cram as much into a "paragraph" as possible.
        Hugh Pickens|Papas Fritas|Ponca City is still writing in that old style.

        -- gewg_

      • (Score: 4, Funny) by TheRaven on Friday March 20 2015, @09:22AM

        by TheRaven (270) on Friday March 20 2015, @09:22AM (#160307) Journal
        Hmm, an editor editing a submission for any reason other than to make it less comprehensible? This site has surely diverged a long way from its parent...
        --
        sudo mod me up
    • (Score: 2) by Jeremiah Cornelius on Friday March 20 2015, @03:05PM

      by Jeremiah Cornelius (2785) on Friday March 20 2015, @03:05PM (#160420) Journal

      https://youtu.be/WHsHKzYOV2E [youtu.be]

      "Technology is nothing. What's important is that you have a faith in people, that they're basically good and smart, and if you give them tools, they'll do wonderful things with them."
      -- Steve Jobs

      --
      You're betting on the pantomime horse...
  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @02:41AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @02:41AM (#160242)

    Should sexist opensource developers have their projects censored or removed?

    Recently an opensource game release story was removed due to the game developer's open sexism(0) and harrasment(1) of women in tech.

    A story posted by the editor of the popular Phoronix linux news site about a release of an Open Source videogame was later manually removed(2). The reason cited was the game developer's unacceptable views on social issues such as gender equality (3).

    The release story was titled "Xonotic-Forked ChaosEsqueAnthology Sees New Release - Phoronix" and can be accessed via the google cache(4).

    With the recent inclusion of a code of conduct(5) for those wishing to contribute to the Linux Kernel some questions now need to be asked and answered about the inclusion of code from people who are known to engage in or promote socially unacceptable attitudes or harrasments of those whom the free-software movement would prefer to attract in their place:

    * Are the social or political views of an author of free software relevant to that software's inherent quality?
    * Should the beliefs of an opensource developer weigh when when evaluating whether a piece of opensource software is worthy of any publicity or public notice?
    * Should men with unpopular or "forbidden" views be excised from the opensource movement and "not allowed" to contribute, in a manner similar to that which is done in employment?
    * Has the free/opensource software movement changed in these respects since its founding? If so is this a positive change?
    * Should there be gatekeepers to opensource that decide who may and who may not contribute. Should abusive developers be "blackballed" to maintain proper social order and controls?

    and

    * What are the consequences of not doing this

    Citations:
    (0) Past related incident: http://esr.ibiblio.org/?p=1310 [ibiblio.org]
    (1) http://geekfeminism.wikia.com/wiki/Debian_and_LinuxChix_harassment_by_MikeeUSA [wikia.com]
    (2) Removed story URL: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=ChaosEsqueAnthology-Rel-51 [phoronix.com]
    (3) http://www.phoronix.com/forums/showthread.php?115776-Xonotic-Forked-ChaosEsqueAnthology-Sees-New-Release/page2 [phoronix.com]
    "Fortunately, the article has been removed now."
    "Thanks everybody for speaking up."
    (4) https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:JeCIgSFrBlgJ:http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page%3Dnews_item%26px%3DChaosEsqueAnthology-Rel-51%2Bchaosesque&gbv=1&tbs=qdr:w&hl=en&&ct=clnk [googleusercontent.com]
    (5) Linux "Code of Conflict"

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @01:04PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @01:04PM (#160366)

      And ladies and gentleman we have our new 'hosts' guy!

      • (Score: 2) by Techwolf on Friday March 20 2015, @07:47PM

        by Techwolf (87) on Friday March 20 2015, @07:47PM (#160538)

        For those that do not know, what or who was thus 'hosts' guy?

    • (Score: -1, Spam) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @03:11PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @03:11PM (#160426)

      Should sexist opensource developers have their projects censored or removed? - Yes, It's one thing to disagree with people, it's another to devalue another person based on how they were born.
      * Are the social or political views of an author of free software relevant to that software's inherent quality? - Yes, open source is a political movement. Why wouldn't it be relevant?
      * Should the beliefs of an opensource developer weigh when when evaluating whether a piece of opensource software is worthy of any publicity or public notice? - Yes
      * Should men with unpopular or "forbidden" views be excised from the opensource movement and "not allowed" to contribute, in a manner similar to that which is done in employment? - Excised from the movement? Until they learn to grow up, yes.
      * Has the free/opensource software movement changed in these respects since its founding? If so is this a positive change? - Yes, the open source movement used to be a group of nerds who escaped into technology as a means of establishing a place of their own and their love of problem solving. Now it's become more inclusive to allow more people to enjoy the same sense of wonder and achievement we all had by creating safe, welcoming spaces for everyone, which means not allowing trolls.
      * Should there be gatekeepers to opensource that decide who may and who may not contribute. Should abusive developers be "blackballed" to maintain proper social order and controls? - No one said you shouldn't make software, no one has to promote your software if you're a jerk. Trisquel welcomed you with open arms. Apparently xonotic did as well. You got blackballed from one site where well reasoned and rational arguments were made as to why you shouldn't be included.
      * What are the consequences of not doing this - less inclusion from people who would otherwise contribute, aside from yourself.

      I suspect I'll now be called a SJW or whatever it is you're calling people these days, say that being open means I have to accept that everyone deserves an equal voice(they don't, everyone deserves an equal "opportunity" for a voice and you've used yours to torment and harass others, free speech comes with consequences)

  • (Score: 2, Disagree) by redneckmother on Friday March 20 2015, @02:53AM

    by redneckmother (3597) on Friday March 20 2015, @02:53AM (#160247)

    I am still struck by Apple's "lock in" and "walled garden" philosophies. Yes, Jobs was very (financially) successful, but methinks he missed out on an opportunity (or three) to change computing and software.
    So many opportunities, so many missed steps.

    --
    Mas cerveza por favor.
    • (Score: 2) by Nerdfest on Friday March 20 2015, @03:21AM

      by Nerdfest (80) on Friday March 20 2015, @03:21AM (#160253)

      I think if a worthy competitor hadn't come along it really *would have* changed software, just not for the better. Even as it is, people are now more open the idea of being told what they are and aren't allowed to install. As I mentioned in another article, I Microsoft is chasing this dream too. It's extremely profitable, but very bad in most ways for users.

    • (Score: 5, Interesting) by mojo chan on Friday March 20 2015, @08:25AM

      by mojo chan (266) on Friday March 20 2015, @08:25AM (#160295)

      His real talent was in building and maintaining the reality distortion field. Even the submission has been sucked in, using the language he managed to associate with himself and Apple: "breathtaking", "visionary". If you read reviews of Apple products, particularly ones written while he was still alive and shortly after one of his speeches, they are full of worlds like "beautiful", "surprising" and always gushing over the design elements. It's like some kind of circle-jerk where everyone feels good about their mutual appreciation of Apple products, as if it somehow enriches their lives.

      --
      const int one = 65536; (Silvermoon, Texture.cs)
      • (Score: 2, Insightful) by rondon on Friday March 20 2015, @12:11PM

        by rondon (5167) on Friday March 20 2015, @12:11PM (#160347)

        This is what I don't get, the rush to proclaim that, "Apple product X has changed my life for the better!" Why does anyone feel the need to proselytize about a phone, or a tablet? When does it stop being tech and start being religion?

        Full disclosure: I hate Apple not because of what they are for the people who truly love their services, but for the distortion they have had over the entire field of handheld computing. I want my smartphone to do what I want, not what some jerk-off in Korea/China/wherever wants the damn thing to do TO me.

        • (Score: 3, Interesting) by demonlapin on Friday March 20 2015, @06:33PM

          by demonlapin (925) on Friday March 20 2015, @06:33PM (#160521) Journal
          Let me guess: you don't have to do tech support for family. I have had a succession of Android phones. Love 'em. My wife, OTOH, has had an iPhone since she gave up Blackberry. Compared to before? Yeah, Apple has made my life better. No more troubleshooting odd little Windows issues - she has an iPad. It's not perfect, but there's so much less that can go wrong.
      • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Friday March 20 2015, @01:05PM

        by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Friday March 20 2015, @01:05PM (#160367) Homepage
        Absolutely. I don't get the "visionary" thing. All I know about Apple products is that some visionary thought I wanted my mouse hand to communicate different messages via morse code, rather than the non-visionary approach of just having multiple buttons, each for a different signal. And that some visionary thought that sticking everything in a sealed container, bound together with non-standard screws, such that no part of the system could be user-accessed was better than the non-visionary approach of giving me flexibility to repair, upgrade, or even mix and match. And that some visionary thought that internet tablets would be a really neat idea despite the non-visionary identical idea being announced nearly a decade earlier by their greatest rival.

        The kinda-irony? I'm typing this on a PowerMac (running Debian :-| ) (But hey - at least I can swap monitors if I want to on this one, unlike some previous visionary Macs.) (Note - I did not pay for this Mac. Apple have never received a single penny from me.)
        --
        I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
    • (Score: 2) by dry on Saturday March 21 2015, @05:39AM

      by dry (223) on Saturday March 21 2015, @05:39AM (#160700) Journal

      In a way he did change computing and software. I remember when he said users didn't need colour and users only needed a closed box and he changed Apple from a company that produced open hardware and published the source code for the ROM to a closed company.
      Now Apple is the most valuable company in the world so obviously the closed model has been a success. At least for some definitions of success.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @03:55AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @03:55AM (#160258)

    He may have been "Half-Genius/Half-Jerk" but he was 100% rounded corners.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @03:58AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @03:58AM (#160260)

      Half-Genius/Half-Jerk, All-Dick.

  • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @04:20AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @04:20AM (#160263)

    Pipedot is now deleting anti-feminist comments.

    Hope the guy that runs it dies soon.
    Just like that guy that ran freenode irc

    • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Ethanol-fueled on Friday March 20 2015, @04:31AM

      by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Friday March 20 2015, @04:31AM (#160267) Homepage

      All 3 at most of those comments per discussion? Well, fuck, that's pretty terrible. What will I do with those 3 discussions I never give a fuck about? Oh, right, adopt a pro-vaccine point of view. Or not. Bwahaha! [google.com] Fuck the Jews!

      Behold! Ethanol-fueled's COCK!

      • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @04:53AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @04:53AM (#160272)

        Nice cloaca on that rooster.

    • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @04:53AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @04:53AM (#160271)

      Are they seriously deleting comments?

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @07:00AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @07:00AM (#160286)

        It be easy to tell with 1 story a day and a few comments.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @03:03PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @03:03PM (#160419)

        I think not, it's just MikeeUSA getting modded to the -1 oblivion and not understanding it. Business as usual, news at 11 and so on.

    • (Score: 1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @08:40AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @08:40AM (#160298)

      Thank fuck someone's trying to keep every tech forum from turning into mini-8chans.
      More power to you, pipedot!

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by gman003 on Friday March 20 2015, @04:22AM

    by gman003 (4155) on Friday March 20 2015, @04:22AM (#160264)

    The first biography of Steve Jobs I read was "Steve Jobs and the NeXT Big Thing". It was written when NeXT seemed to be at the end of its existence (having shut down hardware production) and Steve Job's career seemed likely to be dead, and it chronicled his absolute failures.

    "Creative" is absolutely the wrong word for Steve Jobs. Most of his original ideas were horrible, and all of his good ideas were derivative. He didn't come up with new, inventive solutions - but he brought a focus on purity and quality that made for good products. NeXT failed mostly because Steve Jobs had nobody to rein him in, to tell him when good enough was good enough. For example, the original NeXT Computer was a perfect cube - without the normal draft of even half a degree normally used to remove it from the mold, there was only a single company in the entire US that could produce those cases, and thus they were incredibly expensive. You cannot deny that making the case 0.5 degrees off from perfectly cubical would not have affected the performance or aesthetics in any way - it was perfectionism for the sake of perfectionism, to the cost of the actual product, and that was but one example.

    Perhaps Jobs learned moderation, particularly when NeXT was such a disaster. Perhaps Catmull taught him. Perhaps Apple assigned someone to keep him in check after he returned. Perhaps something else. But his failures deserve to be recognized just as much as his successes.

    • (Score: 5, Informative) by Adamsjas on Friday March 20 2015, @05:49AM

      by Adamsjas (4507) on Friday March 20 2015, @05:49AM (#160281)

      Not to mention his out of wedlock daughter who lived in a car with her homeless mother because Jobs denied patronage for years, until DNA evidence proved he was the father. He knew all along that he was, but DNA evidence was just on the horizon and he new a homeless woman would never be able to afford it.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @06:38AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @06:38AM (#160285)

        Steve gave Lisa a free Lisa but she had nowhere to plug it in except the cigarette lighter?

      • (Score: 4, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @08:04AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @08:04AM (#160292)

        He perjured himself in court, swearing that he was sterile.
        (He went on to have 3 more children.)

        In summary: Jobs was an asshole.

        -- gewg_

    • (Score: 2) by TheRaven on Friday March 20 2015, @09:31AM

      by TheRaven (270) on Friday March 20 2015, @09:31AM (#160310) Journal
      NeXT makes sense in the context: It was the company that existed to produce the computer that Steve Jobs wanted to use. A lot of Apple products since his return have been like this, which has been both a strength and a weakness. It's a strength, because a product designed for one user is far more useable for similar users than one designed based on a committee setting requirements. It's a weakness because features that Steve Jobs didn't use had a habit of disappearing, so it sucked to be a user who relied on them.
      --
      sudo mod me up
    • (Score: 1) by khallow on Friday March 20 2015, @10:49AM

      by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 20 2015, @10:49AM (#160327) Journal

      "Creative" is absolutely the wrong word for Steve Jobs. Most of his original ideas were horrible, and all of his good ideas were derivative.

      So how does that actually different from people you would label with the term, "creative"? I bet most of their original ideas were horrible too and all their good ideas were derivative.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @01:19PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @01:19PM (#160371)

      When someone deliberately parks in handicap spots just because he can. Not because he is 'sticking it to the system'. You may think he is a jerk. I guess I am wrong he is a visionary. I am thinking the CEO could say 'I want a reserved spot by the door'. Just because you have money and a following does not mean it gives you license to be a jerk. There is no license to be a jerk. When I read about how he actually went out of his way to deliberately spend money to do this...

    • (Score: 2) by tibman on Friday March 20 2015, @01:45PM

      by tibman (134) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 20 2015, @01:45PM (#160380)

      I have heard that NeXT was extremely expensive too, 5k 1990 dollars for a workstation. Steve wanted to control both the hardware and software. They had to write a new OS from scratch. So much of what happened at NeXT is what happened/happens at Apple. Apple is considered a success for it and NeXT is considered a failure. The actual NeXT computers are not considered a failure, however. They were pretty awesome.

      --
      SN won't survive on lurkers alone. Write comments.
      • (Score: 3, Informative) by Nuke on Friday March 20 2015, @01:57PM

        by Nuke (3162) on Friday March 20 2015, @01:57PM (#160386)

        They had to write a new OS from scratch.

        I assume you are talking about Next. In fact Next was a Unix system, a customised version of BSD I believe, using the Mach kernel. Not from scratch.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @08:22AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @08:22AM (#160294)

    A genius? More like too stupid to live.

    A genius doesn't stop treatment of his own disease (unless he is tired of living).

  • (Score: 5, Informative) by Thexalon on Friday March 20 2015, @12:13PM

    by Thexalon (636) on Friday March 20 2015, @12:13PM (#160348)

    That's the basic flaw in the pop culture story of Apple: No Woz means no Apple I and no Apple II, and no Apple I or Apple II means no Apple. The popular authors love to treat Steve Jobs as the inventor of the PC, despite the fact that it was Woz's idea to build computers that fit on a desk, and then Woz led the effort to actually design and build them. I'm not saying that Jobs didn't do anything in those early days, but most of what he did was create an environment where Woz could do his thing. Woz was and still is the kind of guy who is more interested in doing cool stuff than getting credit for it, whereas Jobs was more than a bit of an egomaniac so everyone believed Jobs was the brains of the operation.

    That obviously changed when Woz left, but that's how a guy like me who never really experienced Jobs' reality distortion field sees it.

    --
    The inverse of "I told you so" is "Nobody could have predicted"
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by Magic Oddball on Friday March 20 2015, @12:45PM

      by Magic Oddball (3847) on Friday March 20 2015, @12:45PM (#160359) Journal

      I'm not saying that Jobs didn't do anything in those early days, but most of what he did was create an environment where Woz could do his thing.

      Even *that* is actually giving Jobs credit he doesn't deserve. Woz was already designing & building computers from scratch that he then gave away through the Homebrew Computer Club as part of his idealistic future-utopia vision. Jobs saw him doing that, and what he *did* do is: he convinced Woz to stop making computers for free, and instead design ones Jobs could make money selling.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @08:43PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @08:43PM (#160568)

      it was Woz's idea to build computers that fit on a desk

      If you had added "that real people could afford", you'd be closer to the mark.
      The Xerox Alto existed at the time, but only a millionaire could afford such a thing. [wikipedia.org]

      S-100 bus boxes[1] were also evolving at the same time.
      The heavy linear power supplies in those convinced Woz to use a switching supply.

      [1] The 1st of those were kits. [google.com]

      -- gewg_

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @05:44PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 20 2015, @05:44PM (#160498)

    Bullshit

    Mike Scott did that.

    Jobs was a loose cannon who drove everyone around him nuts.