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posted by cmn32480 on Wednesday June 24 2015, @12:36PM   Printer-friendly
from the when-speed-is-of-the-essence dept.

The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) will define "5G" speeds of up to 20 gigabits per second (2.5 GB/s) by 2020:

The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning said Thursday it sent a 12-member delegation to an ITU meeting in San Diego, and succeeded in reflecting the nation's suggestions on the international agreement. "The vision for the 5G network and its global standardization schedule has been agreed based on our suggestion. This has shown that Korea is leading the world's mobile communication technology and related policies," a ministry official said. "We will beef up international cooperation to have the agreement approved without any problems.

The ministry said the union has decided to define 5G as a network which is capable of transmitting data at up to 20 gigabits-per-second. This means that users can download one ultra high-definition movie in 10 seconds. The 5G network will also have a capacity to provide more than 100 megabits-per-second average data transmission to over one million Internet of Things devices within 1 square kilometer. Video content services, including ones that use holography technology, will also be available thanks to the expanded data transmit capacity, the ministry said.

The ITU has determined the name of the 5G network as IMT-2020, following the IMT-2000 for the third-generation network and the IMT-Advanced for the fourth-generation one. The official name will be finally approved at the ITU's Radio Assembly in Geneva in October, the ministry said.

The union also decided to target commercializing the 5G network worldwide by 2020. To do so, it will start receiving applications for technology which can be candidates to become the standard for the new network. Consequently, the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympic Games will be the world's first international event to showcase and demonstrate 5G technology.


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Intel Announces Development of 5G Modems (Due in 2019) 11 comments

Intel Announces XMM 8060 5G & XMM 7660 Category 19 LTE Modems, Both Due in 2019

Intel last week announced that its first commercial 5G modem, the XMM 8060, is now under development and will ship in a couple of years. As part of the announcement, the company reiterated its plans to offer a top-to-bottom XMM 8000 family of 5G modems for various applications, including smartphones, PCs, buildings and vehicles. In addition, the company announced its XMM 7660 Cat-19 LTE modem that supports download speeds of up to 1.6 Gbps, which will be available in 2019.

At present, Intel's 5G Mobile Trial Platform is used to test 5G technologies in different locations around the world. For example, one of such devices installed aboard the Tallink Silja Europa cruise ship is used to enable Internet connectivity to passengers while in port in Tallinn, Estonia, (where another 5G MTP is installed) and the nearby area. Meanwhile, Intel's 5G Modem for client applications is evolving as well. Intel said that devices powered by the silicon can now make calls over the 28 GHz band. The 5G MTP will be used for its purposes for a while and will even gain new capabilities over time, but the company is working on a family of commercial modems that will be used for mass applications sometimes in 2019 and onwards. The Intel XMM 8000-series multi-mode modems will operate in both sub-6 GHz and millimeter wave global spectrum bands, combining support for existing and next-gen radios. Intel does detail the whole lineup two years before the launch but indicates that it will be able to address smartphones, PCs, vehicles, and fixed wireless consumer premise equipment (CPE).

Previously: ITU Defines "5G" as up to 20 Gbps, 2018 Olympics Demo Planned
5G Gets a Shot in the Arm From the FCC
3GPP Sets 2018 as Freeze Date for 5G Air Interfaces
5G Draft Technical Requirements Announced


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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 24 2015, @12:42PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 24 2015, @12:42PM (#200347)

    I can type up to a million characters per second. Assuming I've got a keyboard with that repeat rate and I just keep a single key pressed. Of course in practice, I don't have such keyboards available and I also usually type texts which don't consist of repetitions of the same character over and over again, so my actual typing speed is much lower. But hey, I just said "up to".

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Wednesday June 24 2015, @04:00PM

      by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Wednesday June 24 2015, @04:00PM (#200441) Journal

      The speculation is that 20 Gbps could be shared among several users.

      Also, if you are far away from the cell/router, of course you won't get the maximum speed.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
    • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Wednesday June 24 2015, @04:29PM

      by bob_super (1357) on Wednesday June 24 2015, @04:29PM (#200457)

      The improvement will be up to 9000 or more...

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 24 2015, @07:18PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 24 2015, @07:18PM (#200538)

      Indeed... Up to? Up yours!

  • (Score: 2) by kaszz on Wednesday June 24 2015, @01:15PM

    by kaszz (4211) on Wednesday June 24 2015, @01:15PM (#200360) Journal

    As long as the business model is shaped by data volume limits (data cap). Technologies that enables really fast speeds are redundant because in reality they can't be used. And thus there will be few incentives to upgrade hardware except for stupid people to brag about their impotent device.

    This is true even for 4G, only 1-2-3G works somehow with present data volume limitations.

    Your new technology proved to be a dud in the hands of MBAs.
    Throw it away? Bang your head again? Pretend everything is as fine as the spam says? *blinking cursor* ;)

    • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Wednesday June 24 2015, @01:29PM

      by c0lo (156) on Wednesday June 24 2015, @01:29PM (#200369) Journal

      Throw it away? Bang your head again? Pretend everything is as fine as the spam says? *blinking cursor* ;)

      Mmmm... yeap, I know... set 10GB favicons to all the sites, this will heat up their helpdesks.

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
      • (Score: 2) by kaszz on Wednesday June 24 2015, @01:31PM

        by kaszz (4211) on Wednesday June 24 2015, @01:31PM (#200372) Journal

        If( TCP connection from Micro$slut ) then
            deliver_final_payload(BIG);
        :D

    • (Score: 1) by Francis on Wednesday June 24 2015, @01:47PM

      by Francis (5544) on Wednesday June 24 2015, @01:47PM (#200382)

      That's probably going to be less of an issue for most people. And for people pulling that much data, they'll probably be happy enough to pay.

      I suspect that this will mostly reduce loading times as video for handhelds isn't going to get much bigger, so caps would have to get even smaller for that to be a problem. And with load times decreased, you'll likely see less waste on buffering.

      The real question though us how much will be wasted on ads and poorly designed websites.

      • (Score: 2) by githaron on Wednesday June 24 2015, @05:55PM

        by githaron (581) on Wednesday June 24 2015, @05:55PM (#200497)

        Caps are already a problem given current video size. I avoid watching videos, streaming music, or even going to sites that might have large files (like animated GIFs) when I am connected via the mobile network. I don't want to eat up my data. This means the phone is least useful when its mobile nature should make it the most useful. It might help if I got to roll over my unused data, but I don't.

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by negrace on Wednesday June 24 2015, @01:59PM

    by negrace (4010) on Wednesday June 24 2015, @01:59PM (#200383)

    What is this nonsense, up to 20gigabit?
    The definition should be "at least 10gigabit". Define the worst-case performance, not the best.
    Oh, and throw in unlimited traffic. THAT would be "5G".

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 24 2015, @02:18PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 24 2015, @02:18PM (#200388)

    So, what will this be called in marketing terms?

    3G LTE is marketed as 4G.
    4G is still not available around here, but I expect it will be marketed as 5G.
    Then in a couple of years, when they are still not ready to implement this new standard, they will do an intermediate 4G LTE*, which will probably be marketed as 6G.
    Then finally this standard will likely be marketed as 7G.

    *) like they did 3G LTE a several years after 4G was doing multi-gigabit speeds

    • (Score: 2) by meisterister on Wednesday June 24 2015, @04:25PM

      by meisterister (949) on Wednesday June 24 2015, @04:25PM (#200455) Journal

      Not sure whether to mod this +1 funny, +1 insightful, or +1 sad but true...

      --
      (May or may not have been) Posted from my K6-2, Athlon XP, or Pentium I/II/III.
  • (Score: 2) by MrGuy on Wednesday June 24 2015, @02:30PM

    by MrGuy (1007) on Wednesday June 24 2015, @02:30PM (#200392)

    Consequently, the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympic Games will be the world's first international event to showcase and demonstrate 5G technology.

    There's absolutely no better way to test a new and unproven commercial networking technology than in an environment where there are massively dense crowds in small locations, huge loads on every transceiver, a large diverse and heterogenous set of devices, a likely mix of multiple protocols happening simultaneously, and a high probability that a large number of users will want to refresh data all at the same time (e.g. after the race/heat/event ends)!

    Seriously, I can't imagine a WORSE environment to demonstrate a new networking technology than the Olympics. Perhaps the only saving grace is there will be very few users (hopefully) with 5G-enabled handsets by then.

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by bob_super on Wednesday June 24 2015, @04:31PM

      by bob_super (1357) on Wednesday June 24 2015, @04:31PM (#200459)

      On the other hand, if it survives the Koreans, it's ready for everyone else.

    • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 24 2015, @04:45PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 24 2015, @04:45PM (#200463)

      Seriously, I can't imagine a WORSE environment to demonstrate a new networking technology than the Olympics. Perhaps the only saving grace is there will be very few users (hopefully) with 5G-enabled handsets by then.

      Actually, that is the best environment to test this out. If it works under those conditions, then it will work anywhere. Also, having this happen under the scorching spotlight of focused world attention means that failure will not be an option. Under those circumstances, failure means a lot of anger and uncomfortable questions being directed at the telcos. The telcos will finally have to put up or shut up. No more excuses. I say bring it on!