Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

posted by takyon on Tuesday December 15 2015, @02:48AM   Printer-friendly
from the sending-out-an-sls dept.

Digital analyzer. IMSI catcher. Stingray. Triggerfish. Dirt box. Cell-site simulator. The list of aliases used by the devices that masquerade as a cell phone tower, trick your phone into connecting with them, and suck up your data, seems to grow every day. But no matter what name cell-site simulators go by, whether they are in the hands of the government or malicious thieves, there's no question that they're a serious threat to privacy.

That's why EFF is launching the cell-site simulator section of Street Level Surveillance today.

EFF's Street Level Surveillance Project unites our past and future work on domestic surveillance technologies into one easily accessible portal. On this page, you'll find all the materials we have on each individual technology gathered into one place. Materials include FAQs about specific technologies, infographics and videos explaining how technologies work, and advocacy materials for activists concerned about the adoption of street level surveillance technologies in their own community. In the coming months, we'll be adding materials on drones, stingrays, and fusion centers.


Original Submission

Related Stories

DHS Finds Unauthorized Use of "Stingrays" (IMSI Catchers) in Washington, D.C. 44 comments

In a letter to Senator Ron Wyden, the Department of Homeland Security has acknowledged that unknown users are operating IMSI catchers in Washington, D.C.:

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is acknowledging for the first time that foreign actors or criminals are using eavesdropping devices to track cellphone activity in Washington, D.C., according to a letter obtained by The Hill.

DHS in a letter to Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) last Monday said they came across unauthorized cell-site simulators in the Washington, D.C., area last year. Such devices, also known as "stingrays," can track a user's location data through their mobile phones and can intercept cellphone calls and messages.

[...] DHS official Christopher Krebs, the top official leading the NPPD, added in a separate letter accompanying his response that such use "of IMSI catchers by malicious actors to track and monitor cellular users is unlawful and threatens the security of communications, resulting in safety, economic and privacy risks."

DHS said they have not determined the users behind such eavesdropping devices, nor the type of devices being used. The agency also did not elaborate on how many devices it unearthed, nor where authorities located them.

Also at Ars Technica and CNN.

Related: Police: Stingray Device Intercepts Mobile Phones
ACLU Reveals Greater Extent of FBI and Law Enforcement "Stingray" Use
US IRS Bought Stingray, Stingray II, and Hailstorm IMSI-Catchers
EFF Launches the Cell-Site Simulator Section of Street Level Surveillance
NYPD Making Heavy Use of Stingrays
New York Lawmakers Want Local Cops to Get Warrant Before Using Stingray
New Jersey State Police Spent $850,000 on Harris Corp. Stingray Devices


Original Submission

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
  • (Score: 2) by Whoever on Tuesday December 15 2015, @04:16AM

    by Whoever (4524) on Tuesday December 15 2015, @04:16AM (#276499) Journal

    Why do I get this message when browsing on my cellphone at or near transit hubs? Is this related to some surveillance technology in use?

    • (Score: 2) by frojack on Tuesday December 15 2015, @05:51AM

      by frojack (1554) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday December 15 2015, @05:51AM (#276537) Journal

      Is this a serious question?

      --
      No, you are mistaken. I've always had this sig.
  • (Score: 1) by Some call me Tim on Tuesday December 15 2015, @05:26AM

    by Some call me Tim (5819) on Tuesday December 15 2015, @05:26AM (#276529)

    It's all well and good to know what these things do but how the heck would you know if you were connected to one? Build a device to detect these simulators or a phone app to detect them and disable data transfer and make it available to the public, open source for the win.

    --
    Questioning science is how you do science!
    • (Score: 2) by frojack on Tuesday December 15 2015, @05:47AM

      by frojack (1554) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday December 15 2015, @05:47AM (#276534) Journal

      Exactly.

      If you live in an area with few cell towers, you could monitor the towers for a new one. But that is far too geeky for most people. A simpler approach might be to have an app that mapped signal strength were ever you go in your routine, and then anytime there was a significant change (stronger signal than previously measured) it would notify you. That way each user would build their own private database, and it would not require any exchange of data that might attract police attention.

      There are a few apps in the app store that suggest they can detect these things, but most of them look pretty dodgy to me.

      The EFF page offers nothing to help you out or even report the location of a suspected stingray (reporting one might get you more attention than you bargained for, and I don't even know if it is legal to reveal a stingray location. They may have a warrant. (Don't laugh, it could happen! Couldn't it?).

      --
      No, you are mistaken. I've always had this sig.
      • (Score: 2) by frojack on Tuesday December 15 2015, @06:04AM

        by frojack (1554) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday December 15 2015, @06:04AM (#276541) Journal
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 15 2015, @07:03AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 15 2015, @07:03AM (#276559)

        Once detected, you could use the GPS from multiple users or positions to triangulate it as well.

        However, for me to use such a tool, I would have to turn on the cellular radio.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 15 2015, @01:17PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 15 2015, @01:17PM (#276630)

        Even if they have a warrant, general warrants are unconstitutional. Since Stringrays are mass surveillance devices, warrants don't really matter.

  • (Score: 2) by wonkey_monkey on Tuesday December 15 2015, @09:06AM

    by wonkey_monkey (279) on Tuesday December 15 2015, @09:06AM (#276577) Homepage

    EFF Launches the Cell-Site Simulator Section of Street Level Surveillance

    If you're going to alliterate that much, you might as well commit to it:

    Selfless society starts street-side surveillance cell-site simulator section

    Silly Soylent.

    --
    systemd is Roko's Basilisk