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posted by CoolHand on Friday May 27 2016, @07:58PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the big-brother-gets-a-spanking dept.

Forty-one Secret Service employees are being disciplined for improperly accessing data about a Congressman who was investigating the multitude of scandals involving the Secret Service:

Forty-one employees of the Secret Service have been disciplined for improperly accessing data about Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the secretary of Homeland Security said Thursday. Secretary Jeh Johnson says the employee responsible for leaking that private information to the press has already resigned from the Secret Service.

[...] Johnson now says Chaffetz's files were accessed approximately 60 times, and that most of those occasions violated privacy laws. After investigating 57 Secret Service employees, 41 people will be disciplined — with punishments ranging from a letter of reprimand (for one employee) to suspensions without pay for up to 45 days.

Also at Reuters.

Previously: US Secret Service Violated Privacy Policy to Embarrass Congressman


Original Submission

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US Secret Service Violated Privacy Policy to Embarrass Congressman 8 comments

The Secret Service thought we all needed a reminder that databases of personal information will be exploited for political gain. The chair of the Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Rep. Jason Chaffetz, was leading the investigation into one of the recent cases of Secret Service misconduct. Agents within the service accessed records concerning Chaffetz' application to the Secret Service (which was not acted upon) and then disseminated that information within the agency and talked to the press about it.

The full Inspector General's report (pdf) is available.

Will Chaffetz learn from his experience and strengthen privacy laws for regular citizens?


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 27 2016, @08:17PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 27 2016, @08:17PM (#351754)

    they only get a letter of reprimand, up to 45 days suspension, or a forced resignation, when any of the rest of us would be brought up on criminal charges for an equivalent breach of privacy law(HIPPA, local government, etc)?

    It is time both local and national law enforcement is held to the same standards as (poor to middle class) civilians regarding criminal charges and abuse of position.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 27 2016, @09:09PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 27 2016, @09:09PM (#351771)

      Too big to fail, bro.

    • (Score: 1) by khallow on Friday May 27 2016, @09:18PM

      by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Friday May 27 2016, @09:18PM (#351774) Journal

      they only get a letter of reprimand, up to 45 days suspension, or a forced resignation, when any of the rest of us would be brought up on criminal charges for an equivalent breach of privacy law(HIPPA, local government, etc)?

      That's not an equivalent breach. Accessing employment applications probably are not criminal in the first place. And HIPAA is a much more serious violation both legally and in reality. I don't see a private business meting out worse punishment for the behavior.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 28 2016, @01:40AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 28 2016, @01:40AM (#351842)

        I don't see a private business meting out worse punishment for the behavior.

        You would hope the the Secret Service would be held to a higher standard.

      • (Score: 2) by HiThere on Saturday May 28 2016, @04:17PM

        by HiThere (866) on Saturday May 28 2016, @04:17PM (#351998) Journal

        According to the summary these people violated the privacy laws, not just policy. The GP is spot on.

        --
        Javascript is what you use to allow unknown third parties to run software you have no idea about on your computer.
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 27 2016, @10:38PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 27 2016, @10:38PM (#351805)

      RHIP. Criminal charges for minor things like CFAA and HIPAA violations are for the peasants.

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Snotnose on Friday May 27 2016, @11:40PM

      by Snotnose (1623) on Friday May 27 2016, @11:40PM (#351822)

      See also: Clinton, Hillary D. R.

      It scares the shit out of me that not only is she not rotting in a jail cell right now over her email BS, but she has a good chance of being president.

      / good thing I'm getting old
      // decent chance I'll be dead before things really go to hell
      /// decent chance I'll still be around when things really go to hell :(

      --
      I hate when I put something off to tomorrow, and tomorrow arrives.
      • (Score: 3, Touché) by ilPapa on Saturday May 28 2016, @02:06AM

        by ilPapa (2366) Subscriber Badge on Saturday May 28 2016, @02:06AM (#351849) Journal

        // decent chance I'll be dead before things really go to hell

        We're all rooting for you, brother.

        --
        You are still welcome on my lawn.
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 28 2016, @02:34AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 28 2016, @02:34AM (#351856)

      Realistically, unless you're black, you wouldn't be sentenced to the maximum either.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 28 2016, @10:00AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 28 2016, @10:00AM (#351947)

        But they also wouldn't be given a slap on the wrist.

      • (Score: 2) by HiThere on Saturday May 28 2016, @04:19PM

        by HiThere (866) on Saturday May 28 2016, @04:19PM (#351999) Journal

        Not getting the maximum punishment is quite different from only getting an administrative punishment, and often a mild one, and not being charged at all.

        --
        Javascript is what you use to allow unknown third parties to run software you have no idea about on your computer.
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 28 2016, @05:53PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 28 2016, @05:53PM (#352018)

      Why do you think the rest of us would be brought up on charges?