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posted by cmn32480 on Saturday October 01 2016, @05:53PM   Printer-friendly
from the winning(?)-the-war-on-drugs dept.

The blowback against the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's decision to ban kratom has caught the attention of a bipartisan group of legislators, but a DEA spokesman has said that "It's not a matter of if. It's simply a matter of when" the DEA bans kratom:

A bipartisan group of nine senators is calling on the Drug Enforcement Administration to delay its "unprecedented" decision to ban kratom, a plant that researchers say holds great potential for mitigating the effects of the opioid epidemic. [...] The Senate letter, spearheaded by Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) says: "Congress granted emergency scheduling authority to the DEA based on the need for law enforcement interdiction of new and previously unknown illegal synthetic street drugs that result in injuries and death. The use of this emergency authority for a natural substance is unprecedented, so it is important to determine whether the circumstances here necessitate a jump to Schedule I.

"Given the long reported history of Kratom use," the letter continues, "coupled with the public's sentiment that it is a safe alternative to prescription opioids, we believe using the regular review process would provide for a much-needed discussion among all stakeholders." [...] The DEA cites 600-plus poison-control center calls involving kratom between 2010 and 2015 in its justification for banning the plant, and notes that 15 deaths were linked to the use of the plant between 2014 and 2016. In an interview with The Washington Post, a DEA spokesman later clarified that all but one of those fatalities involved the use of other substances. Earlier this week 51 U.S. representatives similarly called on the DEA and the White House to reconsider or at least delay the ban, which was slated to go into effect as early as Friday. In an interview, DEA spokesman Russell Baer confirmed that the ban was not yet in place. "We have not yet determined a date when we will publish that final order" putting the ban into effect, he said.

There may be a public comment period before the ban takes effect, and the White House is now obligated to respond to the petition about kratom, which has reached over 140,000 signatures.

Text of the Senators' letter. Also at Ars Technica, CBS, and US News & World Report.

Previously: DEA Welcomes Kratom to the Schedule I List Beginning September 30
Heroin, Fentanyl? Meh: Carfentanil is the Latest Killer Opioid
Alcohol Industry Bankrolls Fight Against Legal Pot in Battle of the Buzz [Updated]


Original Submission

Related Stories

DEA Welcomes Kratom to the Schedule I List Beginning September 30 32 comments

Kratom, an herbal drug made of ground-up tree leaves, is "temporarily" joining other natural substances such as cannabis, psilocybin, and peyote on the schedule I list of the Controlled Substances Act. The active ingredients in kratom, the indole alkaloids mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine, are both being added to the list for up to three years, after which they can be added permanently.

Prior to this move, the U.S. has already been seizing shipments of kratom:

In 2014, the FDA issued an import alert that allowed US Customs agents to detain kratom without a physical examination. "We have identified kratom as a botanical substance that could pose a risk to public health and have the potential for abuse," said Melinda Plaisier, the FDA's associate commissioner for regulatory affairs. According to the DEA, between February 2014 and July 2016, nearly 247,000 pounds of kratom were seized.

Advocates say that kratom is a natural treatment for opioid addiction, an application that the Drug Enforcement Agency dismisses. Meanwhile, the heroin/opioid epidemic continues with "unprecedented" events like the recent 174 heroin overdoses in just six days in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Check out the implosion of this kratom subreddit, which is attempting to get 100,000 signatures on the White House petition site:

APATHY WILL GET US NOWHERE. IF THERE WAS EVER A TIME FOR US TO BAND TOGETHER, ITS NOW. stand with me brothers and sisters. hope is not lost.


Original Submission

Heroin, Fentanyl? Meh: Carfentanil is the Latest Killer Opioid 32 comments

When customers want a longer-lasting high, heroin dealers respond by augmenting their products with drugs like carfentanil:

A powerful drug that's normally used to tranquilize elephants is being blamed for a record spike in drug overdoses in the Midwest. Officials in Ohio have declared a public health emergency, and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says communities everywhere should be on alert for carfentanil. The synthetic opioid is 100 times more potent than fentanyl, the prescription painkiller that led to the death earlier this year of the pop star Prince. Fentanyl itself can be up to 50 times more deadly than heroin.

In the past few years, traffickers in illegal drugs increasingly have substituted fentanyl for heroin and other opioids. Now carfentanil [alt link] is being sold on American streets, either mixed with heroin or pressed into pills that look like prescription drugs. Many users don't realize that they're buying carfentanil. And that has deadly consequences.

"Instead of having four or five overdoses in a day, you're having these 20, 30, 40, maybe even 50 overdoses in a day," says Tom Synan, who directs the Hamilton County Heroin Coalition Task Force in Southwest Ohio. He's also the police chief in Newtown, Ohio. Synan says carfentanil turned up in Cincinnati in July. At times, the number of overdoses has overwhelmed first responders. "Their efforts are truly heroic, to be going from call to call to call," he says. "One district alone had seen 14 in one shift, so they were nonstop."

First responders and emergency room workers are being told to wear protective gloves and masks. That's because carfentanil is so potent, it can be dangerous to someone who simply touches or inhales it. This was devastatingly clear back in 2002, after a hostage rescue operation in Moscow that went wrong. To overpower Chechen terrorists who'd seized control of a theater, Russian Special Forces sprayed a chemical aerosol into the building. More than 100 hostages were overcome and died. Laboratory tests by British investigators later revealed [open, DOI: 10.1093/jat/bks078] [DX] that the aerosol included carfentanil.

In the article about the DEA adding kratom to Schedule I, I mentioned an "unprecedented" amount of "heroin" overdoses in Cincinnati. The carfentanil-cut heroin boosted the overdose tally to 174 in 6 days (225 in Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, and New Jersey):

Deaths have not spiked along with the overdose reports because police officers or emergency medical technicians are immediately administering naloxone, sometimes in more than one dose, to bring heroin users back to consciousness and start them breathing.


Original Submission

Alcohol Industry Bankrolls Fight Against Legal Pot in Battle of the Buzz [Updated] 26 comments

Alcohol and painkiller manufacturers, terrified that they might lose market share, are major players in the fight against pot-legalizations ballot initiatives.

The fight against legalized pot is being heavily bankrolled by alcohol and pharmaceutical companies, terrified that they might lose market share.

On the heels of a filing last week that revealed that a synthetic cannabis company is financing the opposition to legal marijuana in Arizona comes a new disclosure this week that a beer industry group made one of the largest donations to an organization set up to defeat legalization in Massachusetts.

The Beer Distributors PAC, an affiliate that represents 16 beer-distribution companies in Massachusetts, gave $25,000 to the Campaign for a Safe and Healthy Massachusetts, tying it for third place among the largest contributors to the anti-pot organization.

William A. Kelley, the president of the Beer Distributors of Massachusetts, did not respond to a request for comment, but his organization's decision to oppose legalization is hardly unique in the alcohol industry.

In Arizona, one of the five states with marijuana legalization ballot measures this November, the Arizona Wine and Spirits Wholesale Association donated $10,000 to a group opposing legalization. In 2010, the last time California considered marijuana legalization, another alcoholic beverage distribution group provided financing to a law enforcement-backed campaign to defeat legalization.

Source: https://theintercept.com/2016/09/14/beer-pot-ballot/

[Update: The article in The Intercept had two 'links' that lacked any actual URL. An alternative was found for the link to William A. Kelley and replaced. Could not find a link to corroborate the $10,000 donation in Arizona — that link was removed. -Ed.]


Original Submission

DEA Delays Ban on Pain-Relieving Herb Kratom; Waits for FDA Report & Public Comment 31 comments

The Washington Times reports [Link no longer available]

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA] will hold off on a previously-announced ban of the herbal drug Kratom while soliciting additional input from the public and the Food and Drug Administration [FDA].

A DEA announcement in August that it planned to add the psychoactive compounds in Kratom to the list of Schedule I drugs[1] banned under the Controlled Substances Act drew outrage from individuals who believe the herbal supplement, which is derived from trees indigenous to Southeast Asia, can help individuals struggling with opioid addiction.

"Since publishing that notice, DEA has received numerous comments from members of the public challenging the scheduling action and requesting that the agency consider those comments and accompanying information before taking further action," states a notice[PDF] issued [October 12] by the DEA that it will withdraw its proposal to ban the substance.

[...] In addition to accepting public comments[2] on Kratom through December 1, the DEA has also asked for a scientific and medical evaluation of the drug by the FDA. [DEA spokesman Melvin] Patterson said the DEA initially asked for such an assessment in 2014, but never received the results and opted to go forward with the ban without the assessment.

[...] Susan Ash, who founded the American Kratom Association in 2014 to advocate for users of the drug, said [...] "We believe Kratom should not be scheduled in any way, shape or form," Ms. Ash said. "It's been consumed safely for decades in the U.S. and world-wide for millennium, so there is no impetus to make it a controlled substance."

[1] Claimed to have no legit medical value and a high potential for abuse (as Cannabis is classified)

[2] Their directions are in the PDF, which tells you to go to a ridiculous page which is driven by scripts and use the code Docket No. DEA-442W. It's as if they want to make it as difficult as possible to comment.

Previous: The Calm Before the Kratom Ban


Original Submission

One Upside to Opioid Overdoses: More Organ Donors 21 comments

More organs have become available for transplant in British Columbia, Canada, due to a rise in drug overdoses:

After a brutal year where more than 900 people died of drug overdoses in British Columbia, doctors are pointing to one morbid upside. It might sound like something out of a dystopian horror comic, where drug users are wiped out and harvested for organs. New stats released by the health agency responsible for organ transplants show that's not exactly a far-off nightmare anymore. Health officials have noticed a significant uptick in organ donor deaths, and say that fentanyl is likely playing a role. According to BC Transplant, the number of organ donors in the first weeks of 2017 has doubled over this time last year, from 10 to 20. That's resulted in 59 transplants, up from 37 organs over the same period in 2016.

[...] "We started tracking the connection between fentanyl and organ donation more closely at the start of 2017, and fentanyl has been a contributing factor in about a quarter of our donors so far this year." BC Transplant's statement cautions against drawing conclusions based on a small amount of recent data. But long term trends show the proportion of organ donors dying from overdose has gone up steadily over many years. Back in 2013, 7.5 percent of organ donors tested positive for drugs. In 2016, that number rose to 22.7 percent.

Previously: Opioid Addiction is Big Business
Obama Administration Expands Access to Suboxone Treatment
DEA Welcomes Kratom to the Schedule I List Beginning September 30
Heroin, Fentanyl? Meh: Carfentanil is the Latest Killer Opioid
The Calm Before the Kratom Ban


Original Submission

FDA Blocks More Imports of Kratom, Warns Against Use as a Treatment for Opioid Withdrawal 22 comments

The FDA has issued a public health advisory warning of deaths related to kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) and warning against using it to treat opioid withdrawal symptoms. The DEA attempted to temporarily regulate kratom as a schedule I drug in 2016, but stopped short of doing so after a public backlash. From FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb's statement on the advisory:

It's very troubling to the FDA that patients believe they can use kratom to treat opioid withdrawal symptoms. The FDA is devoted to expanding the development and use of medical therapy to assist in the treatment of opioid use disorder. However, an important part of our commitment to this effort means making sure patients have access to treatments that are proven to be safe and effective. There is no reliable evidence to support the use of kratom as a treatment for opioid use disorder. Patients addicted to opioids are using kratom without dependable instructions for use and more importantly, without consultation with a licensed health care provider about the product's dangers, potential side effects or interactions with other drugs.

There's clear data on the increasing harms associated with kratom. Calls to U.S. poison control centers regarding kratom have increased 10-fold from 2010 to 2015, with hundreds of calls made each year. The FDA is aware of reports of 36 deaths associated with the use of kratom-containing products. There have been reports of kratom being laced with other opioids like hydrocodone. The use of kratom is also associated with serious side effects like seizures, liver damage and withdrawal symptoms.

Given all these considerations, we must ask ourselves whether the use of kratom – for recreation, pain or other reasons – could expand the opioid epidemic. Alternatively, if proponents are right and kratom can be used to help treat opioid addiction, patients deserve to have clear, reliable evidence of these benefits.

FDA Labels Kratom an Opioid 37 comments

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has released a new statement denouncing the drug kratom. The statement says that the FDA has learned about new deaths that "involved" kratom use, additional adverse effects associated with its use have been found, and that Public Health Assessment via Structural Evaluation (PHASE) "3-D computer technology" has been used to analyze the chemical compounds in kratom:

Using this computational model, scientists at the FDA first analyzed the chemical structures of the 25 most prevalent compounds in kratom. From this analysis, the agency concluded that all of the compounds share the most structural similarities with controlled opioid analgesics, such as morphine derivatives.

The FDA continues to discourage the use of kratom, which it is calling an opioid.

CDC Warns of Salmonella Infections Linked to Kratom 16 comments

At this time, the CDC recommends that people not consume kratom in any form because it could be contaminated with salmonella:

An outbreak of 28 salmonella infections in 20 states has been linked to kratom products, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a statement Tuesday. Though no deaths have been reported, 11 people have been hospitalized.

[...] California had the highest number of salmonella cases (three). North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania and Utah each reported two cases while Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, North Dakota, New York, South Carolina and Tennessee each reported a single case, the CDC found.

Kratom should not be consumed in any form, the CDC said, because the source of salmonella contamination has not been identified.

Also at The Verge, STAT News, and CBS.

Previously: DEA Welcomes Kratom to the Schedule I List Beginning September 30
The Calm Before the Kratom Ban
FDA Blocks More Imports of Kratom, Warns Against Use as a Treatment for Opioid Withdrawal
FDA Labels Kratom an Opioid

Related: Opioid Commission Drops the Ball, Demonizes Cannabis


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by BsAtHome on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:14PM

    by BsAtHome (889) on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:14PM (#408846)

    Not too far in the future: It is a pest for government control and corporate profits, that a simple thing called nature is allowed to interfere. That can not stand. We, the people, demand that nature will cease and desist in producing products out of control and without profit.

    Hyperbole? Well, maybe not. Maybe soon only large corporations will "own" the majority of the food producing plants. Time to ban the free alternatives because "they assist in the cure of hunger"... So, they qualify for medical treatment (hunger) and must therefore be controlled. I do not want to live in this world anymore.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:20PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:20PM (#408851)

      You are way off base. Let this receive the safety and scientific scrutiny it should, but it is because of corporate influence that it can sail along making any claims it wants, and is not subject to ANY scrutiny for its safety, all because it is a "natural" supplement. It is you suckers who think "all natural" is not only superior, but actually means something. Given the supplement industry, statistically it means "placebo". Anything with beneficial efficacy is far in the minority here.

      • (Score: 4, Informative) by takyon on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:29PM

        by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:29PM (#408854) Journal

        Putting it on Schedule I prevents anyone from growing it in their own home for their own use.

        It clearly has a painkiller effect, and medical science does look at anecdotal reports when evaluating drugs (just as the DEA is as part of their justification for banning it).

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      • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Nerdfest on Saturday October 01 2016, @07:29PM

        by Nerdfest (80) on Saturday October 01 2016, @07:29PM (#408857)

        How about they just have to actually prove harm before banning it? Is that too much to ask?

        • (Score: 5, Insightful) by edIII on Saturday October 01 2016, @08:03PM

          by edIII (791) on Saturday October 01 2016, @08:03PM (#408864)

          What? The harm is out there for everyone to see man! Will nobody think of the lost profits for the pharmaceutical industries?!

          We just can't have some natural plant take over opiate markets like an invasive species. Perhaps, when Kratom is studied more and can be monetized we will re-discover its medical properties. On another note, if we deregulate all the drugs how will the DEA continue to survive and provide jobs? How will local law enforcement be able to mass seize property to raise funds to continue to fight the scourge that is self-help medical?

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          • (Score: 0, Disagree) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @10:28PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @10:28PM (#408885)

            This has nothing to do with the "lost profits of the pharmaceutical industries" and everything to do with the "lost profits of the dietary supplement industry".

          • (Score: 3, Informative) by tathra on Sunday October 02 2016, @01:02AM

            by tathra (3367) on Sunday October 02 2016, @01:02AM (#408922)

            Perhaps, when Kratom is studied more and can be monetized we will re-discover its medical properties.

            schedule 1 bans all research, so this move is preventing pharmaceutical companies from monetizing it as well.

            • (Score: 4, Informative) by takyon on Sunday October 02 2016, @01:15AM

              by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Sunday October 02 2016, @01:15AM (#408927) Journal

              Not entirely true, but it does make it harder [soylentnews.org]:

              In the words of a 2015 Brookings Institution report, a move to Schedule II "would signal to the medical community that [the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health] are ready to take medical marijuana research seriously, and help overcome a government-sponsored chilling effect on research that manifests in direct and indirect ways."

              The DEA approves the cannabis studies and controls the supply, so you could easily see how they could pick and choose researchers more likely to conform to their backwards views or do scarier studies starting from a point of studying cannabis "abuse".

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        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @11:10PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @11:10PM (#408889)

          This stuff affects your mind, and it's not an upper like nicotine or caffeine. People using such substances tend to crash cars, causing death and other damage.

          Pointing at alcohol is no excuse; we partially legalized that one because everybody was ignoring the laws.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @11:29PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @11:29PM (#408897)

            Uh, citation?

            Unless you just said that we should ban all prescription painkillers.

            That I wouldn't have a problem with.

            But be fucking consistent, asshole.

            • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @11:48PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @11:48PM (#408908)

              Unless you just said that we should ban all prescription painkillers.

              That I wouldn't have a problem with.

              I have felt intense, extended duration pain before. If a human were to be the direct cause of such pain for me, I would not hesitate to kill that human as quickly as possible, and precious few other humans would object to my doing so.

              In that same logical thread, should I be in great pain, and effective painkillers be available, but a third party insists I not be provided with the painkillers using the threat of lethal force to enforce their decision, I do not see how that third party is not directly culpable for my great pain in the same manner as if they were directly causing the pain themselves.

              I am a hair's breadth away from considering the mass killing of DEA agents (starting at/near the top and working on down) to be justifiable homicide.

          • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 02 2016, @01:05AM

            by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 02 2016, @01:05AM (#408923)

            we partially legalized that one because everybody was ignoring the laws.

            And everyone ignores the drug prohibition laws too, so why aren't they being repealed? Oh right, they're intentionally not enforcing drug laws when it comes to whites [bennorton.com], but drug laws give them an excuse to throw the book at uppity niggers.

            • (Score: 2, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 02 2016, @01:15AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 02 2016, @01:15AM (#408929)

              Oh right, they're intentionally not enforcing drug laws when it comes to whites, but drug laws give them an excuse to throw the book at uppity niggers.

              Drug "law"enforcement hits white-skinned folk, too, but you are quite correct that one of two primary targets for the illegal War on Drugs was and is black-skinned folk.

              Nixon Invented the Drug War to Decimate Hippies and Black People, Former Adviser Confesses [reason.com]
              Legalize It All - How to win the war on drugs (source) [harpers.org]

            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 02 2016, @02:19AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 02 2016, @02:19AM (#408953)

              when it comes to whites

              Rich whites.

      • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Anal Pumpernickel on Sunday October 02 2016, @02:22AM

        by Anal Pumpernickel (776) on Sunday October 02 2016, @02:22AM (#408956)

        Let this receive the safety and scientific scrutiny it should

        I don't mind scrutiny or education campaigns, but when you suggest that government thugs should arrest people for ingesting and/or possessing substances like this, you become an enemy of freedom.

      • (Score: 2) by art guerrilla on Sunday October 02 2016, @11:33AM

        by art guerrilla (3082) on Sunday October 02 2016, @11:33AM (#409043)

        you are way off base: do i own my own body or not ? ? ?
        IF i do (and i think we should), THEN it stands to reason i can put whatever i want in my body whenever i want for whatever reasons i want...
        otherwise, that is the very definition of a nanny-state...

        • (Score: 2) by TheReaperD on Sunday October 02 2016, @09:40PM

          by TheReaperD (5556) on Sunday October 02 2016, @09:40PM (#409152)

          Sadly, according to many legal standards, you do not own your body. This is the legal reasoning behind why it is a crime to commit suicide (yes, you can be arrested if you try to commit suicide and fail). The same justification can be used for laws against taking drugs while selling drugs can be considered a violation of the commerce clause. I highly disagree with this principle but, it is how laws are currently applied. Disclaimer: I took classes but, I am not a lawyer.

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    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @11:21PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @11:21PM (#408894)

      Don't want to live?

      Careful there citizen. It is illegal to die from non-natural means til we at least have enough robots to replace you. And then if you are not able to work due to fewer jobs you may die of starvation. Thank you for your support citizen. Good day.

  • (Score: 4, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:15PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:15PM (#408847)

    That guy has been in bed with the "dietary supplement" lobby for decades. He is a large part of the reason the FDA was gutted of all power [scienceblogs.com] to regulate the supplement industry. His family personally profits [nytimes.com] from the fake drug industry. He being the spokesman for this only reinforces in my mind that the DEA is right on this topic. Guarantee that Hatch is getting nice campaign contributions for this, and people close to him will be getting richer as well.

    • (Score: 4, Informative) by takyon on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:16PM

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:16PM (#408848) Journal

      Hatch... along with:

      • Mike Lee (R-Utah)
      • Mark Kirk (R-Ill.)
      • Angus King (I-Maine)
      • Michael F. Bennet (D-Colo.)
      • Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)
      • Thom Tillis (R-N.C.)
      • Ron Wyden (D-Ore.)
      • Mark R. Warner (D-Va.)
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    • (Score: 4, Informative) by takyon on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:20PM

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Saturday October 01 2016, @06:20PM (#408850) Journal

      As well as 51 members of the House of Representatives in a separate letter.

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    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by HiThere on Saturday October 01 2016, @08:33PM

      by HiThere (866) on Saturday October 01 2016, @08:33PM (#408868) Journal

      No. NOTHING should be on schedule 1. I can understand arguments for restricting some drugs, though they tend to go overboard in a massive power grab, but schedule 1 should be abolished.

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    • (Score: 2) by Hyperturtle on Saturday October 01 2016, @11:14PM

      by Hyperturtle (2824) on Saturday October 01 2016, @11:14PM (#408891)

      kratom is most certainly not part of his herbal supplement regime.

      Perhaps one can read up on it? He may smell an opportunity; Kratom has mostly been underground if perhaps an open secret, but it's not like you can get it at GNC or the grocery store's vitamin aisle. Not yet, anyway.

      How they can conclude it has no medical use or benefit and then simutaneously seek to classify it to prevent research into it to determine if that is the case, certainly is self-fulfilling of a prophecy. Mr. Hatch would be seeking a self-profiting pharmacy; it is not always bad to play such interests against one another.

      For people that have found a use for Kratom, it could be a way that they are able to continue purchasing it. Looking at the various places posting about it, it seems that more people signed the petition than has been done for medical marijuana (although I do not know if thats in total or just in a given scenario--this being the first one for Kratom).

      Even if it is only higher in some context rather than all of them, it is important -- there are regular people writing in about this. Look at some of the youtube videos about it--middle aged women who are not your typical thrill seekers are pleading that this is left alone.

      Sounds to me like something of value may be in those leaves... and it also sounds to me that the Martin Shrekli's of the world (or whatever his name is) are circling sharks. No way to profit if it's cheap and grows on trees... better limit the supply to control the distrubution to a growing demand...

       

  • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 02 2016, @12:33AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 02 2016, @12:33AM (#408916)

    For those who are curious:

    https://www.erowid.org/ [erowid.org]
    https://www.erowid.org/plants/kratom/kratom.shtml [erowid.org]

    take the "experiences" area(s) with a grain of salt though

  • (Score: 2) by tathra on Sunday October 02 2016, @12:57AM

    by tathra (3367) on Sunday October 02 2016, @12:57AM (#408919)

    600 poison control center calls in 5 years and a mere 15 deaths in 2 years? thats several orders of magnitude safer than tylenol, and tens or hundreds of orders of magnitude safer than alcohol. why aren't those being banned, considering they're both significantly more dangerous and toxic than kratom? or mdma, or psylocibin, or mescaline, or lsd, etc. fucking pieces of shit don't give a shit about public safety or saving lives, their entire fucking job is to destroy lives and shred the constitution. its surprising to see so much of congress speaking up though. past examples prove that no matter how much medical evidence is provided, once the DEA decides to put something on schedule 1 nothign will change their minds period (see mdma for a prominent example), but if anyone can stop these haters of freedom and human rights, its the people who can shut down their whole agency, congress.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 02 2016, @02:28AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 02 2016, @02:28AM (#408958)

      I don't even know where in the Constitution the federal government is granted the authority to arbitrarily ban drugs, let alone without a specific act of congress! The commerce clause was never designed to give the government power over all interstate commerce (Let alone activities that take place entirely within one state and might not even be commerce at all!), but to stop states from interfering with the interstate commerce of other states. There's nowhere in the Constitution that says that congress can cede its lawmaking powers to the agencies it creates, either, so this is truly a bizarre situation. The government is violating the highest law of the land on a massive scale, and many normal people I talk to about this scoff at the idea that the government's actions are unconstitutional. We've had entire generations of people believing that the notion that the federal government only has the powers specifically given to it by the Constitution is now somehow null and void.

  • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Sunday October 02 2016, @05:34AM

    by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Sunday October 02 2016, @05:34AM (#408990) Homepage Journal

    Authoritarian enforcement agency explores new vectors for enforcing it's authority - more news at 11:00.

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