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posted by cmn32480 on Wednesday December 07 2016, @10:22PM   Printer-friendly
from the fire-up-the-John-Deere dept.

According to a December 1st article from NASA:

On Nov. 10, 2016, scientists on NASA's IceBridge mission photographed an oblique view of a massive rift in the Antarctic Peninsula's Larsen C ice shelf....

The IceBridge scientists measured the Larsen C fracture to be about 70 miles [113 km] long, more than 300 feet [91 m] wide and about a third of a mile [a half of a kilometer] deep. The crack completely cuts through the ice shelf but it does not go all the way across it – once it does, it will produce an iceberg roughly the size of the state of Delaware.

The British Antarctic Survey's Halley VI research station is currently located on the Larsen C ice shelf. Fortunately, the station was designed to move. A December 7th article from The Guardian gives more information about that station and the upcoming move:

The British Antarctic Survey's Halley VI research station has recorded data relevant to space weather, climate change, and atmospheric phenomena from its site on the Brunt Ice Shelf shelf since 2012....

The new site, nicknamed Halley VI A, was identified during in-depth site surveys in the 2015-16 Antarctic summer. Now that winter has passed, the relocation team are preparing to tow the station 23km [14 miles] to its new home using large tractors.

The Telegraph outlines the timeframe for the move:

In 2012, satellite monitoring of the ice shelf revealed the first signs of movement in the chasm that had lain dormant for at least 35 years and, by 2013, it began opening at an alarming pace of one mile per year. If the base does not move, it could be in danger of tumbling into the chasm by 2020.

To make matters more time critical, in October, a new crack emerged 10 miles [16 km] to the north of the research station across the route sometimes used to resupply the base.

The team has just nine weeks to relocate operations, before the harsh winter begins, making it difficult to move the structure amid complete darkness, plummeting temperatures and gale-force winds.

Additional information about the Halley VI research station is available from the British Antarctic Survey.


Original Submission

Related Stories

Gap Exposed by Iceberg Breaking Off the Larsen Ice Shelf to be Studied 2 comments

The ecosystem in between the Larsen Ice Shelf and a giant iceberg is due to be studied:

Scientists will set out in the next week to study an Antarctic realm that has been hidden for thousands of years.

A British Antarctic Survey-led team will explore the seabed ecosystem exposed when a giant iceberg broke away from the Antarctic Peninsula in 2017.

The organisation has also released the first video of the berg, which covers almost 6,000 sq km.

[...] British Antarctic Survey marine biologist Dr Katrin Linse, who is leading the mission, said that the calving of the iceberg, which has been named A68, provides researchers with "a unique opportunity to study marine life as it responds to a dramatic environmental change". "It's important we get there quickly before the undersea environment changes as sunlight enters the water and new species begin to colonise," she explained, adding that the mission was "very exciting".

Also at Live Science.

Related: Antarctic Larsen C Ice Shelf to Calve; Halley VI Research Station Plans Move
Larsen C Rift Branches as it Comes Within 5 km of Calving
Larsen C Calves Trillion Ton Iceberg
That Huge Iceberg Should Freak You Out. Here's Why


Original Submission

Larsen C Calves Trillion Ton Iceberg 51 comments

A one trillion tonne iceberg – one of the biggest ever recorded - has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica. The calving occurred sometime between Monday 10th July and Wednesday 12th July 2017, when a 5,800 square km section of Larsen C finally broke away. The iceberg, which is likely to be named A68, weighs more than a trillion tonnes. Its volume is twice that of Lake Erie, one of the Great Lakes.

http://www.projectmidas.org/blog/calving/

Also at BBC, PBS, The Guardian, and The Verge.

Complete Calving Coverage:

Antarctic Larsen C Ice Shelf to Calve; Halley VI Research Station Plans Move
Antarctic Ice Rift Close to Calving, After Growing 17km in 6 Days
Delaware-Sized Iceberg Could Break Off of Antarctica at Any Moment
Larsen C Rift Branches as it Comes Within 5 km of Calving


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 4, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 07 2016, @10:24PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 07 2016, @10:24PM (#438538)

    What line will the Chinese NOT cross to screw with US politics?

  • (Score: 3, Funny) by Anne Nonymous on Wednesday December 07 2016, @10:43PM

    by Anne Nonymous (712) on Wednesday December 07 2016, @10:43PM (#438540)

    If all that pesky ice would just melt off, we could build the damn station right on rock and not have to worry about moving it.

    • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Wednesday December 07 2016, @10:49PM

      by bob_super (1357) on Wednesday December 07 2016, @10:49PM (#438541)

      > melt off

      Silly dangerous idea...
      Where would my private helicopter get the pristine ice that my private jet flies to my private mountain island so I may have chilled drinks off the chests of the top models who decorate my yacht? Puls I like my beach as is, and rising waters would reduce the size of my property.

      • (Score: 2) by butthurt on Thursday December 08 2016, @04:38AM

        by butthurt (6141) on Thursday December 08 2016, @04:38AM (#438620) Journal

        Hawaii used to have glaciers. [wattsupwiththat.com] Recently it had heavy snowfall. [cleveland.com] Perhaps the glaciers will regrow.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 08 2016, @03:21PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 08 2016, @03:21PM (#438743)

          Hawaiian Glacier is my favorite strain of weed, man.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 07 2016, @11:10PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 07 2016, @11:10PM (#438547)

      Don't worry. Trumps gonna bringing back coal! Burn baby, BURN!

      • (Score: 3, Funny) by DECbot on Wednesday December 07 2016, @11:56PM

        by DECbot (832) on Wednesday December 07 2016, @11:56PM (#438556) Journal

        He does have a point, you need more energy to run enough air conditioning units to cool down the earth. That's what happens when you open the window during summer, you let the cool air out. But those idiots opened a hole in the ozone layer anyway and now look at the mess, global warming. Hopefully the people in charge have enough sense to not run the A/C continuously and freeze up the condenser.

        --
        cats~$ sudo chown -R us /home/base
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 08 2016, @12:24AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 08 2016, @12:24AM (#438560)

          So instead of a space elevator we're going to have a space heatsink for all the A/C units? What a gyp.

        • (Score: 2) by butthurt on Thursday December 08 2016, @05:36AM

          by butthurt (6141) on Thursday December 08 2016, @05:36AM (#438637) Journal

          So if I take hair spray and if I spray it in my apartment which is all sealed and-- you're telling me that affects the ozone layer?

    • (Score: 2) by butthurt on Thursday December 08 2016, @01:22AM

      by butthurt (6141) on Thursday December 08 2016, @01:22AM (#438577) Journal

      The Americans did just that on Ross Island.

      https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:McMurdo_Station.jpg [wikimedia.org]

      The other American station is at the pole; there's little chance it will drift off into the sea.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amundsen%E2%80%93Scott_South_Pole_Station [wikipedia.org]

  • (Score: 1) by lcklspckl on Thursday December 08 2016, @06:26PM

    by lcklspckl (830) on Thursday December 08 2016, @06:26PM (#438795)

    Fun times ahead. When the western sheets collapse. Human cities are going to be like an origami bee situated around a bathtub full of toddlers.