Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

SoylentNews is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop. Only 19 submissions in the queue.
posted by cmn32480 on Thursday February 16, @01:57PM   Printer-friendly
from the i-am-in-the-wrong-profession dept.

From www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/london-life/a3460256.html

Rapidly becoming more important than even the 24/7 hairdresser, the social media manager and the "paleo genius" personal chef, top cyber-security consultants are the most in-demand for the super-rich, business tycoons and the A-list as they look to keep their embarrassing secrets, naked photos and diva-ish demands out of the hands of hackers.

After Beckileaks, those consultants might just be ramping up their rates because, for brand-reliant celebrities, the financial damage, reputational risk and sheer embarrassment of such revelations are one of the most serious threats to their careers.

[...] Benjamin Arnold, whose SORTED personal management firm acts as a fixer for London's super-rich, says "There's been a definite increase in concern about cyber-protection among high-net-worth [HNW] and celebrity clients, especially following hacking incidents such as the [Lawrence] iCloud hack which exposed — quite literally — a number of high-profile celebrities. We are all exposed to the same risk but high-profile or HNW individuals are at a much bigger threat, as the value of their assets make them more of a target."

His clients will pay "anything from £2,500 up to £15,000 for a security sweep" and another £5,000 for training, "putting in best practice for the family, just as you would for locking up the house". It's small cash for some celebs, who believe that a brutal data-hack could cost them their career.

[...] Consultants say one-off "cyber-hygiene" sessions, costing as much as £3,000, are increasingly popular: tech sleuths will comb through clients' smartphones, laptops, tablets, external hard drives and cloud accounts, set up two-factor authentication (where logging into, say, a Gmail or Twitter account involves filling in a unique code that's sent to a smartphone), work on complex passwords (and insist on clients using different ones for every account), set up encrypted email services and install cyber-security software onto their home and work networks.


Original Submission

Related Stories

Emma Watson Explains Why She Won't Take Selfies With Fans 35 comments

Continuing from a recent SN article on how rapidly the hacking industry is growing, it appears that Emma Watson may be taking advice from digital security experts. According to a recent story in the EveningStandard, Ms. Watson told Harper's Bazaar that:

"For me, it's the difference between being able to have a life and not. If someone takes a photograph of me and posts it, within two seconds they've created a marker of exactly where I am within 10 metres. They can see what I'm wearing and who I'm with. I just can't give that tracking data."

Will this be the new normal?


Original Submission

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough

Mark All as Read

Mark All as Unread

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
  • (Score: 5, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 16, @02:29PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 16, @02:29PM (#467789)

    The hottest jobs are hairdresser and telephone sanitiser. This story is familiar.

    • (Score: 2) by Zz9zZ on Thursday February 16, @02:43PM

      by Zz9zZ (1348) on Thursday February 16, @02:43PM (#467796)

      Take your upmod you dirty geek!

      --
      ~Tilting at windmills~
    • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Thursday February 16, @08:50PM

      by bob_super (1357) on Thursday February 16, @08:50PM (#467952)

      Opening more land to logging and fracking, as well as defunding the EPA, are necessary steps before adopting the leaf as our currency.

      • (Score: 2) by el_oscuro on Friday February 17, @02:08AM

        by el_oscuro (1711) Subscriber Badge on Friday February 17, @02:08AM (#468042)

        Now that we have all become extremely rich, we have a slight problem with inflation due to the availability of leaves. So we are going reduce the monetary supply by burning down the forests. That will work well.

        --
        SoylentNews is Bacon! [nueskes.com]
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 17, @05:35AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 17, @05:35AM (#468102)

      It's blindingly obvious: let's pack them all into Australia and launch it towards Mars.

  • (Score: 2) by Thexalon on Thursday February 16, @02:53PM

    by Thexalon (636) Subscriber Badge on Thursday February 16, @02:53PM (#467801) Homepage

    ... as they look to keep their embarrassing secrets, naked photos and diva-ish demands out of the hands of hackers.

    Here's an idea: Instead of spending thousands on trying to keep your secrets, how about doing your best to not being a selfish jerk? That will do much more than hiring a high-priced security firm.

    --
    If you act on pie in the sky, you're likely to get pie in the face.
    • (Score: 2, Informative) by butthurt on Thursday February 16, @03:23PM

      by butthurt (6141) on Thursday February 16, @03:23PM (#467822) Journal

      Are you saying that if one has nothing to hide, one has nothing to fear?

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nothing_to_hide_argument [wikipedia.org]

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 16, @04:15PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 16, @04:15PM (#467845)

        Jerks tend to react like jerks when critizing other jerks. Its a regular jerk-o-thon! Why don't the grand parent just keep his mind on his/her own business, it would do all of us a favor.

      • (Score: 2) by Thexalon on Thursday February 16, @04:22PM

        by Thexalon (636) Subscriber Badge on Thursday February 16, @04:22PM (#467846) Homepage

        There are several aspects of this that make this substantially different:
        1. The consequences of the things we're talking about here are public embarrassment, not imprisonment or something like that. And not even that much public embarrassment, at this point, because very few people really care.
        2. The risk is from private individuals, not the government. Arguments about what the government should or shouldn't be able to do are irrelevant here.
        3. The people in question chose to become celebrities, well aware of the consequences of that choice.

        --
        If you act on pie in the sky, you're likely to get pie in the face.
      • (Score: 3, Interesting) by WillR on Thursday February 16, @06:11PM

        by WillR (2012) on Thursday February 16, @06:11PM (#467903)
        Anyone who still says that didn't watch the last US election. If one has nothing to hide, one can still be put off-message by a constant stream of "whatabout"-ism and lose an election that should have been a slam dunk.

        Oh, and a bunch of 4chan weirdos will make up an elaborate conspiracy theory about one's favorite restaurant being a front for a satanic NWO pedo cult.
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 16, @05:05PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 16, @05:05PM (#467871)

    Sounds better than rich clients?

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 17, @05:14AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday February 17, @05:14AM (#468092)

      alternative working class folks

  • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Thursday February 16, @05:08PM

    by DannyB (5839) on Thursday February 16, @05:08PM (#467876)

    It sounds like hacking has become a booming business. Maybe that means the tax returns will be made public at some point.

    Hackers have all sorts of different motives. Money. Fame. Politics. Sex. As an escape from having to venture forth from the basement to take the trash out.