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posted by on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:28AM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the brothers-in-arms dept.

Common Dreams reports:

Proponents of an open internet are holding a rally on Monday [February 27] to mark the two-year anniversary of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) vote that enshrined net neutrality protections that the new Trump administration has already begun eroding.

The 3pm event in Washington, D.C [was] backed by the Color of Change, National Hispanic Media Coalition, Center for Media Justice, and Free Press, and will feature the FCC's only Democratic commissioner, Mignon Clyburn.

[...] According to Timothy Karr, senior director of strategy for Free Press, "No FCC chair over the past 40 years has been so bent on undermining the agency's public-service mission and destroying the safeguards on which hundreds of millions of Americans rely."

Laying out the stakes, Max Anderson, coordinator for Human Rights Watch's general counsel's office, wrote last week:

Should net neutrality be scrapped in the U.S., it will enable service providers to throttle internet speeds or block access to websites based on commercial deals they cut with media providers. That would undermine freedom of expression and access to information. Once these practices have been established, it's a short step to other human rights consequences. Governments that already attempt to stifle lawful online expression will welcome a new tool for silencing critics. The FCC should retain its good example to the world and enforce net neutrality. If the internet stands a chance of enabling the realization of human rights, then access needs to be nondiscriminatory and in line with human rights in the widest sense.

[...] So, what can people do?

"The short answer is to raise hell", said Craig Aaron, CEO of Free Press, to Mercury News columnist Troy Wolverton.

"Net neutrality is an issue that a lot of people care about--millions and millions more than the FCC ever expected", Aaron said. "We need to hear from those people again."

The good old days: U.S. Appeals Court Upholds Net Neutrality Rules in Full
What's that? You thought we fought this one before? FCC Extends Net Neutrality Comment Period (Again)


Original Submission

Related Stories

FCC Extends Net Neutrality Comment Period (Again) 24 comments

TechCrunch reports

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced Friday it would extend the net neutrality reply comment period from September 10 to September 15.

The commission has already received more than 1.1 million comments, which it released to the public last week. That is the largest number of comments the FCC has ever received, with the exception of Janet Jackson's "wardrobe malfunction" in 2004, which garnered 1.4 million comments. With three extra days, net neutrality commenters will likely beat that.

The deadline for the reply comment period was pushed back to match the extension of the initial comment period, which occurred in July after the FCC experienced issues with its website. Because the first comment period was extended three additional business days and the reply period then started later, the FCC extended the period for reply comments.

"To ensure that members of the public have as much time as was initially anticipated to reply to initial comments in these proceedings, the Bureau today is extending the reply comment deadline by three business days," the FCC said in a release.

So keep your comments coming!

Related:
FCC Extends Internet Slow Lane Comment Period

U.S. Appeals Court Upholds Net Neutrality Rules in Full 29 comments

In a bit of good news for the Obama administration (and most Americans), the U.S. D.C Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the FCC's Open Internet Order rules:

High-speed internet service can be defined as a utility, a federal court has ruled, a decision clearing the way for more rigorous policing of broadband providers and greater protections for web users.

The court's decision upholds the F.C.C. on the declaration of broadband as a utility, the most significant aspect of the rules. That has broad-reaching implications for web and telecommunications companies and signals a shift in the government's view of broadband as a service that should be equally accessible to all Americans, rather than a luxury that does not need close government supervision.

The court's opinion can be found here.

takyon: Also at Tom's Hardware. Alternate link for the Appeals Court decision.


Original Submission

Politics: FCC Guards Eject Reporter 37 comments

John M. Donnelly, a senior writer at CQ Roll Call, said he was trying to talk with FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly one-on-one after a news conference when two plainclothes guards pinned him against a wall with the backs of their bodies.

Washington Post

“Not only did they get in between me and O’Rielly but they put their shoulders together and simultaneously backed me up into the wall and pinned me to the wall for about 10 seconds just as I started to say, “Commissioner O’Rielly, I have a question,” Donnelly said Friday.

Donnelly said he was stopped long enough to allow O’Rielly to walk away.

Los Angeles Times

Donnelly, who also happens to be chair of the National Press Club Press Freedom team, said he was then forced out of the building after being asked why he had not posed his question during the news conference.

O'Rielly apologized to Donnelly on Twitter, saying he didn't recognize Donnelly in the hallway. "I saw security put themselves between you, me and my staff. I didn't see anyone put a hand on you. I'm sorry this occurred."

Politico

According to the publication for which the reporter works (archived copy),

Senators, including Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley, are warning the Federal Communications Commission about its treatment of reporters after a CQ Roll Call reporter was manhandled Thursday.

“The Federal Communications Commission needs to take a hard look at why this happened and make sure it doesn’t happen again. As The Washington Post pointed out, it’s standard operating procedure for reporters to ask questions of public officials after meetings and news conferences,” the Iowa Republican said. “It happens all day, every day. There’s no good reason to put hands on a reporter who’s doing his or her job.”

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  • (Score: 4, Informative) by butthurt on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:56AM (9 children)

    by butthurt (6141) on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:56AM (#473207) Journal
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @06:09AM (8 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @06:09AM (#473225)

      From what I've been reading the FCC will be gutted. Net neutrality is done.
      I imagine the abuses are about to begin .. no more regulations .. anywhere

      • (Score: 5, Informative) by NotSanguine on Wednesday March 01 2017, @06:36AM (7 children)

        From what I've been reading the FCC will be gutted. Net neutrality is done.
        I imagine the abuses are about to begin .. no more regulations .. anywhere

        WTF is wrong with you? If you need mommy to step in, then you're a loser and you deserve to die. Whether it be tainted food, killer pharmaceuticals (think Vioxx or laetrile), pulmonary complications from air pollution, water tainted with runoff from coal mines/chemical plants/etc. If you're not rich, there's obviously something wrong with you. You are not worth a damn. You should just kill yourself.

        If you're not a winner, then you don't even deserve scraps. So quit whining to mommy gub'mint and make your billion dollars. Cheeto Jesus did. If you can't, it's because you're an inferior form of life that deserves to be put down in the harshest way possible.

        As for net neutrality, where's the good in that? If I can't make a buck selling your privacy, then something is horribly wrong.

        You seem to think you matter. I bet L'Orange spends more on chips and dip than you make in a year. Which means you don't count. Get with the program, moron!

        --
        No, no, you're not thinking; you're just being logical. --Niels Bohr
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @07:11AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @07:11AM (#473232)

          Tripping already?

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @02:04PM (5 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @02:04PM (#473302)

          You should just kill yourself.

          I tried, and you bleeding heart asshole fucks stopped me.

          MAKE UP YOUR DAMN MIND ALREADY!

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:15PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:15PM (#473322)

            That's because you chose a method where no one profits. Book a space trip complete with space walk, and then while in space open the helmet of your space suit. That way everyone can profit from your suicide. First, the space company you paid for the trip. Next, the media companies that not only have the sensational news of the first suicide in free space, but additionally can place lots of opinion pieces about whether it is ethical to do suicide that way, whether something should be done to prevent further suicides of that sort, whether the company should have noticed your plan and stopped you, whether private space travel is good, after all, and so on. Also, they will be able to speculate whether you went to space in order to commit suicide, or if you became suicidal only after entering space, which can then spawn the topic of whether going to space may wreck your mind, well, you see, the possibilities are endless. Of course there will be books written about the incident, Hollywood will at some point turn it into a movie, conspiracy theorists will speculate whether extraterrestrials made you do it, or if it was just plain old mind manipulation rays from the government, applied through a nearby secret satellite …

          • (Score: 2) by Grishnakh on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:41PM (3 children)

            by Grishnakh (2831) on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:41PM (#473341)

            Someone who thinks poor people should just kill themselves is not a "bleeding heart". That's a textbook definition of a Christian conservative.

            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @09:17PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @09:17PM (#473529)

              No. Christian conservatives are less likely to be pro-suicide. They tend to regard it as a sin.

              Those who follow catholic teachings, as well as many that are closely related, regard it is succumbing to despair.

              Any theologians who can give us chapter and verse?

            • (Score: 2) by butthurt on Wednesday March 01 2017, @10:17PM (1 child)

              by butthurt (6141) on Wednesday March 01 2017, @10:17PM (#473570) Journal

              In Christian theology charity is the greatest of the three theological virtues.

              -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charity_%28virtue%29 [wikipedia.org]

              Actual rewards may vary and are subject to availability and other terms.

              • (Score: 3, Informative) by Grishnakh on Wednesday March 01 2017, @11:45PM

                by Grishnakh (2831) on Wednesday March 01 2017, @11:45PM (#473616)

                Wrong Christians. You're talking about some kind of mythical Christian that either doesn't exist any more (and probably never did in great numbers anyway), or maybe exists in some other country. Here in America, Christian conservatives are all big fans of Ayn Rand and think that anyone who can't afford healthcare should be left on the street to die. America's Christians all go to giant mega-churches in their gigantic SUVs and sip on Starbucks drinks while the preacher tells them how rich people are rich because God loves them more.

  • (Score: 0, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @05:26AM (10 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @05:26AM (#473218)

    Net neutrality IN THE CROSSHAIRS.

    Proponents of an open internet

    vote that enshrined net neutrality protections

    new Trump administration has already begun eroding

    so bent on undermining the agency's public-service mission and destroying the safeguards on which hundreds of millions of Americans rely

    .... I could carry on, but I'm sure you get the idea.

    Funny thing is, I'm a proponent of net neutrality - in fact, I'm a proponent of an opaque net design, so that neutrality is the only option. But then I get fed tripe like this, as if I were too weak-minded to choose the side of gleaming righteousness, defended by a harried band of underdog paladins against the ravening orcs of Mord ... I mean, DC.

    Come on. Try to at least get neutral enough in the stories that I'm not embarrassed to agree with you, maybe?

    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @07:01AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @07:01AM (#473230)

      What's your gripe? Given what they're reporting on - the deliberate and willful dismantling of a public good - this is remarkably unbiased headlining.

    • (Score: 2) by MostCynical on Wednesday March 01 2017, @08:29AM (4 children)

      by MostCynical (2589) on Wednesday March 01 2017, @08:29AM (#473240) Journal

      Classic method of rationalising awful things - convince yourself (and, maybe, others) that anyone who is telling about how crap things are is being irrational - as you are the epitome of rational, thinkjng man. "look, the sun is still coming up, everything is not that bad!"

      --
      "I guess once you start doubting, there's no end to it." -Batou, Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:17PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:17PM (#473323)

        But the scientists turned the sun into a giant nuclear reactor, and now people are getting cancer from it! ;-)

      • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Wednesday March 01 2017, @04:16PM (1 child)

        by tangomargarine (667) on Wednesday March 01 2017, @04:16PM (#473357)

        mumble mumble Ayn Rand mumble mumble rational self-interest mumble mumble Fuck You Got Mine

        --
        "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @10:12PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @10:12PM (#473567)

          Eejit Pie is a corporate shill and if someone claims otherwise with a straight face, then I have a beautiful bridge to sell them. I suspect quite a few Americans who voted for Trump didn't realise they'd get the Party of Personal Responsibility (aka fuck you, I got mine) too.

      • (Score: 3, Informative) by Zz9zZ on Wednesday March 01 2017, @05:18PM

        by Zz9zZ (1348) on Wednesday March 01 2017, @05:18PM (#473400)

        AC specifically stated they are in favor of Net Neutrality. I am also tired of verbose emotional rhetoric in articles, its a cheap propaganda trick that treats people like children (rightfully so it would seem sometimes) and journalists should rise above it. That said, the quotes AC selected are far from the extreme edge of the spectrum... could be a troll... "Now I agree with this, but just listen to how stupid these people are!"

        --
        ~Tilting at windmills~
    • (Score: 2, Disagree) by linkdude64 on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:33PM (2 children)

      by linkdude64 (5482) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:33PM (#473333)

      Ironically it seems the political side who most vehemently supports "Net neutrality" are apparently the least able to remain objective and neutral when it comes to politics.

      • (Score: 3, Insightful) by DeathMonkey on Wednesday March 01 2017, @07:01PM (1 child)

        by DeathMonkey (1380) on Wednesday March 01 2017, @07:01PM (#473449) Journal

        That's not irony, Allanis. To vehemently support something is to lose neutrality, by definition.

        • (Score: 2) by linkdude64 on Friday March 03 2017, @08:58PM

          by linkdude64 (5482) Subscriber Badge on Friday March 03 2017, @08:58PM (#474577)

          Irony is defined as, "the use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning." Doesn't the statement "I support net neutrality" fit that description? Genuinely not sure - I have had a long day.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:57PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @03:57PM (#473350)

      I'll grant you the language is a bit more verbose than needed, but compared to some other articles I've seen it is downright mellow. Hardcore environmentalist articles are 10x worse, and conservative articles spew so much more hatred and emotional language. Same level of ridiculous but centered on anger. Net neutrality isn't some liberal fantasy you knobs.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @01:28PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 01 2017, @01:28PM (#473292)

    Plan A:
    Couple content to delivery into a great monolith and gain power and profit.
    Examples include radio,tv, cable, telco, newspaper, music, and Hollywood.
    Quite a formidable group.

    Plan B:
    Decouple content from delivery and let a bunch of new, upstarts gain traction.
    Examples include the ISP's and content folks.
    It turns out, a much more formidable group. (Just ask the record industry.)

    Plan C:
    The guys from plan B get comfortable and tired of pesky new startups nipping at their heels.
    They see the wisdom in plan A and find a way to make it so.

    The lesson here should be that big is bad for the little guy.
    It doesn't matter if it is big business, big labor, or big government.
    The Wild West style of the evolving Internet has been an equalizer for the little guy.
    The FCC is enabling new monoliths to put things back to the usual non-equal state.
    Well, it was fun while it lasted.

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