Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

posted by Fnord666 on Sunday March 19 2017, @11:53PM   Printer-friendly
from the adding-insult-to-injury dept.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170313085320.htm

Women who undergo fertility therapy, but do not get pregnant, have a higher risk of developing long-term cardiovascular disease, compared with women who become pregnant, according to a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). "We found that two-thirds of women never became pregnant after being managed for fertility treatment and these women also had worse long-term cardiovascular risk, specifically higher risks of stroke and heart failure, compared with the remaining third of women who did become pregnant and delivered a baby," says Dr. Jacob Udell, lead author of the study, scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and cardiologist at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre and Women's College Hospital.

[...] The study looked at data on 28 442 women under age 50 who underwent fertility therapy in Ontario during the study (April 1993 through March 2011). The women were followed until March 31, 2015, for adverse cardiovascular effects. About one-third (9349) gave birth within 1 year of final treatment, while the remaining two-thirds did not give birth. Fertility therapy failure was associated with a 19% increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, in particular, heart failure. However, the researchers stress the absolute risk was modest at about 10 events per 1000 women after 10 years for those where fertility therapy failed versus 6 events per 1000 women for those who became pregnant and delivered a child after fertility therapy. [...] "These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that fertility therapy may represent an early indication for future cardiovascular disease because it represents a unique cardiometabolic stress test," write the authors.

Failure of fertility therapy and subsequent adverse cardiovascular events (DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.160744) (DX)


Original Submission

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough

Mark All as Read

Mark All as Unread

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
(1)
  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by MrGuy on Monday March 20 2017, @12:17AM (2 children)

    by MrGuy (1007) on Monday March 20 2017, @12:17AM (#481297)

    Correlation is not causation.

    The alternative hypothesis is that certain women with medical risk factors that could lead to a higher likelihood of cardiovascular disease also respond less well to fertility treatment.

    The quote is telling: "These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that fertility therapy may represent an early indication for future cardiovascular disease because it represents a unique cardiometabolic stress test," write the authors. (emphasis mine)

    Stating your findings are "consistent with a hypothesis" is a far cry from stating that their findings provide evidence in support of a hypothesis. All you're saying is that your findings do not refute the hypothesis. Nothing more.

    • (Score: 2) by frojack on Monday March 20 2017, @03:12AM

      by frojack (1554) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @03:12AM (#481345) Journal

      Seems to me that desperate wannabe mothers who still can't conceive or carry to term might suffer depression perhaps leading to overeating.
      That seems far more likely than fertility therapy having any long term effect.

      --
      No, you are mistaken. I've always had this sig.
    • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Monday March 20 2017, @02:26PM

      by JoeMerchant (3937) on Monday March 20 2017, @02:26PM (#481502)

      It's also consistent with a psychological/lifestyle based hypothesis: "Women who wanted children but could not have them are more prone to make lifestyle choices which lead to significant cardiovascular disease."

      http://tylervigen.com/spurious-correlations [tylervigen.com]

(1)