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posted by Fnord666 on Monday March 20 2017, @06:41AM   Printer-friendly
from the return-of-the-vibrating-belt dept.

Rejoice, lazy Soylentils. Whole-body vibration may be somewhat as effective as actual exercise:

A less strenuous form of exercise known as whole-body vibration (WBV) can mimic the muscle and bone health benefits of regular exercise in mice, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's journal Endocrinology. WBV consists of a person sitting, standing or lying on a machine with a vibrating platform. When the machine vibrates, it transmits energy to the body, and muscles contract and relax multiple times during each second.

[...] "Our study is the first to show that whole-body vibration may be just as effective as exercise at combating some of the negative consequences of obesity and diabetes," said the study's first author, Meghan E. McGee-Lawrence, Ph.D., of Augusta University in Augusta, Ga. "While WBV did not fully address the defects in bone mass of the obese mice in our study, it did increase global bone formation, suggesting longer-term treatments could hold promise for preventing bone loss as well."

[...] The genetically obese and diabetic mice showed similar metabolic benefits from both WBV and exercising on the treadmill. Obese mice gained less weight after exercise or WBV than obese mice in the sedentary group, although they remained heavier than normal mice. Exercise and WBV also enhanced muscle mass and insulin sensitivity in the genetically obese mice. Although there were no significant effects in the young healthy mice, the low-intensity exercise and WBV protocols were designed for successful completion by obese mice. These findings suggest that WBV may be a useful supplemental therapy to combat metabolic dysfunction in individuals with morbid obesity. "These results are encouraging," McGee-Lawrence said. "However, because our study was conducted in mice, this idea needs to be rigorously tested in humans to see if the results would be applicable to people."

Whole-body Vibration Mimics the Metabolic Effects of Exercise in Male Leptin Receptor Deficient Mice


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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 20 2017, @07:31AM (12 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 20 2017, @07:31AM (#481385)

    Sick pervs like me are wondering if the marketing for this amazing new vibrator will be targeted at the modern, independent woman on the go. I can see the desk chair model being especially popular.

    • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Monday March 20 2017, @07:43AM (11 children)

      by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @07:43AM (#481389)

      this amazing new vibrator will be targeted at the modern, independent woman on the go.

      Not only pervy, but also an attention deficient mind.

      TFA titlw: "Whole-body Vibration Mimics the Metabolic Effects of Exercise in Male Leptin Receptor Deficient Mice"

      Quote from TFA(bstract):

      To determine whether whole-body vibration recapitulates the metabolic and osteogenic effects of physical activity, we exposed male wildtype (Wt) and leptin receptor deficient (db/db) mice to daily treadmill exercise or whole-body vibration for three months.

      At most, the technique may offer extra employment for "whole male-body vibrating professionals".
      Perhaps airtasker is a good place to find them on the cheap.

      • (Score: 2) by maxwell demon on Monday March 20 2017, @07:57AM (1 child)

        by maxwell demon (1608) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @07:57AM (#481393) Journal

        They don't say it doesn't work on female mice, they just say they tested it on males. Given that it doesn't involve sex-specific parts of the body, I'd expect it to work just as well on female mice. Of course only the experiment can tell for sure, but the probability is pretty high.

        I also note that you took it as given that the result translates to male humans, despite the fact that this is less likely than that it translates to female mice.

        --
        The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
        • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Monday March 20 2017, @08:16AM

          by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @08:16AM (#481399)

          I also note that you took it as given that the result translates to male humans,

          Huh? Where? I'm sure I was not species-specific in my the technique may offer extra employment for "whole male-body vibrating professionals".

          despite the fact that this is less likely than that it translates to female mice.

          On another tangent, I know for sure there is a mean for humans to feel the benefit of a mild physical exercise by the mean of full-body vibration. I might even apply for a patent for "Improved physical form for humans by manually shaking the full body of your mouse pet daily" - it's non-obvious and has full scientific support.

          (large grin)

          PS my apologies for not grinning [soylentnews.org] in the post you replied to.

      • (Score: 1) by anubi on Monday March 20 2017, @07:57AM (5 children)

        by anubi (2828) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @07:57AM (#481394)

        Go, moobies , Go! [youtube.com]

        --
        "Prove all things; hold fast that which is good." [KJV: I Thessalonians 5:21]
        • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Monday March 20 2017, @08:33AM (4 children)

          by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @08:33AM (#481403)

          Definitely does not work for modern women [buzzfeed.com]

          • (Score: 1) by anubi on Monday March 20 2017, @09:00AM (2 children)

            by anubi (2828) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @09:00AM (#481415)

            Hehe... When I saw this topic, I remembered those old machines. Even to this day, I see technologies using vibrational technology for fat dispersal. And it probably works nearly as well as a good walk.

            Incidentally, thanks for BLIT on the other forum. That was an interesting foray into some science fiction I was completely unaware of. It seems so do-able too, given some illusions I have seen with simple graphics that seem to produce dots where there is none, or rotate when I know good and well its impossible for them to do so.

            --
            "Prove all things; hold fast that which is good." [KJV: I Thessalonians 5:21]
            • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Monday March 20 2017, @09:22AM (1 child)

              by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @09:22AM (#481421)

              Incidentally, thanks for BLIT on the other forum.

              NP.
              BTW, any electronics projects on instructables or somewhere else?

              • (Score: 1) by anubi on Monday March 20 2017, @09:51AM

                by anubi (2828) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @09:51AM (#481427)

                Sorry, I haven't uploaded any of my stuff yet... I sure ought to, though.

                I have not developed the presentation technologies needed.

                --
                "Prove all things; hold fast that which is good." [KJV: I Thessalonians 5:21]
          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 20 2017, @04:12PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 20 2017, @04:12PM (#481551)

            Definitely does not work for modern women

            Indeed. This observation at the end of her article says it all: Remember to be skeptical of any “health machines” that claim to do all the work for you.

            There are no short cuts. Get out there and exercise more.

      • (Score: 1) by Soylentbob on Monday March 20 2017, @08:43AM (2 children)

        by Soylentbob (6519) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @08:43AM (#481406)

        Not only pervy, but also an attention deficient mind.
        TFA titlw: "Whole-body Vibration Mimics the Metabolic Effects of Exercise in Male Leptin Receptor Deficient Mice"

        On the risk of appearing prejudiced: According to several articles I read (I won't bother to give a specific link; google for "men women shopping habits" offers plenty, apparently all pointing in the same direction. Pick whichever site appears reputable enough to you.), statistically, women appear to be much more likely to respond to marketing pitches targeting their vanity, and to spend money on lifestyle products etc. So, from the currently available weak evidence, I'd presume it is more effective to target a female audience, even though on top of the different species (compared to the test objects) they also have a different gender.

        BTW: Looking ad the average truck driver, considering that the truck should offer plenty of vibrations, I wonder...

        • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Monday March 20 2017, @09:07AM (1 child)

          by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @09:07AM (#481418)

          BTW: Looking ad the average truck driver, considering that the truck should offer plenty of vibrations, I wonder...

          Perhaps the point of vibrations application has an influence - e.g. applying them on the butt may cause fat to settle quicker?

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 20 2017, @11:18PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 20 2017, @11:18PM (#481841)

            1. Buy a Harley-Davidson.
            2. Ride it around (it's designed to shake).
            .
            .
            5. Profit from selling your tight ass?

  • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Monday March 20 2017, @07:34AM

    by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 20 2017, @07:34AM (#481388)

    Sounds as a good ad for soylent consuming yuppies [robrhinehart.com] who would hate wasting time in sexual encounters.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 20 2017, @08:07AM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 20 2017, @08:07AM (#481397)

    The passive exerciser machines [buzzfeed.com] have been around most of a century. [starling-fitness.com]

    There's a belt that is worked by an eccentric drive. [buzzfeed.com]

    Apparently, you feel if afterwards. [starling-fitness.com]

    -- OriginalOwner_ [soylentnews.org]

  • (Score: 2) by richtopia on Monday March 20 2017, @06:14PM

    by richtopia (3160) on Monday March 20 2017, @06:14PM (#481649) Homepage Journal

    I wonder if this has applications for space travel. Maintaining bone density is very difficult in space, so even if it isn't an effective exercise if it can help keep your bones strong it could still serve a purpose.

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