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posted by n1 on Friday May 19, @04:02AM   Printer-friendly
from the flying-pigs-require-faa-clearance dept.

A bill has been introduced that, if passed, would put a slight check on the NSA's exploitation of software vulnerabilities:

A bill proposed in Congress on Wednesday would require the U.S. National Security Agency to inform representatives of other government agencies about security holes it finds in software like the one that allowed last week's "ransomware" attacks.

Under former President Barack Obama, the government created a similar inter-agency review, but it was not required by law and was administered by the NSA itself.

The new bill would mandate a review when a government agency discovers a security hole in a computer product and does not want to alert the manufacturer because it hopes to use the flaw to spy on rivals. It also calls for the review process to be chaired by the defense-oriented Department of Homeland Security rather than the NSA, which spends 90 percent of its budget on offensive capabilities and spying.


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  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by MadTinfoilHatter on Friday May 19, @04:33AM (1 child)

    by MadTinfoilHatter (4635) on Friday May 19, @04:33AM (#512015)

    This won't put any kind of checks on anything. It only means that the vulnerabilities previously exploitable by the NSA, will now also be exploitable by the CIA, FBI, and probably some other TLA:s as well. DHS? (Shudders.)

    Of course it also means that there will be even more potential holes for those vulnerabilities to leak to criminals not employed by any TLA, and we'll have another round of ransomware pwnage. Yay for "checks and balances".

  • (Score: 2) by kaszz on Friday May 19, @05:01AM (3 children)

    by kaszz (4211) on Friday May 19, @05:01AM (#512027) Journal

    Personally I have passed a rule that Santa Claus have to give me a new super computer every year. This forces him to do this. :-)

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 19, @05:42AM (2 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 19, @05:42AM (#512036)

      Silly fool, smartphones are supercomputers for your pocket. You just asked for one bargain bin phone per year. Lame.

      • (Score: 2) by kaszz on Friday May 19, @05:58AM

        by kaszz (4211) on Friday May 19, @05:58AM (#512040) Journal

        Nah, computerphones are for wimps. I asked for big room full with racks to the ceiling equipped with processor 19" units and a suitable nuclear plant to power it. :p

      • (Score: 3, Funny) by DannyB on Friday May 19, @03:35PM

        by DannyB (5839) on Friday May 19, @03:35PM (#512225)

        If that is so, then smartphones make a pretty poor excuse as a pocket supercomputer.

        Real supercomputers have significantly more powerful vibrators.

  • (Score: 2) by fraxinus-tree on Friday May 19, @09:35AM (3 children)

    by fraxinus-tree (5590) on Friday May 19, @09:35AM (#512098)

    IANAUSresident, but media coverage of NSA in no way differs from other countries' problems.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 19, @11:33AM (2 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 19, @11:33AM (#512120)

      Just like the CIA can't torture ... unless they want to! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senate_Intelligence_Committee_report_on_CIA_torture [wikipedia.org]

      Seriously, if you haven't read the 525 page executive summary [sic!], do it tonight. Just make sure you got a bucket nearby.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 19, @01:12PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 19, @01:12PM (#512149)

        Look forward, not back. Just how unpatriotic can you be!?

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 19, @07:15PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 19, @07:15PM (#512307)

          Patriotism? Don't you go throwing around meaningless terms there, young man.
          Next time you use a word that you think means something real, reflect on this first: https://i.imgur.com/zD4C2.jpg [imgur.com]

          "Patriotism"... pffha...

  • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 19, @06:26PM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 19, @06:26PM (#512290)

    these dumb fucks still don't get it. they are trying to keep it closed source but they want in on the exploits. hey! you dumb old whores! you can't secure slaveware! also, fuck you for thinking you don't have to share the exploits with private industry and individual users in the country, not that it matters with weaknesses and back doors built in. you idiots should be funding improvements to linux security, hardware security/demanding open,verifiable firmware and replacing all your NationalEmbarrassmentOS installs with Linux, not funneling public funds to slaveware peddling scum. You deserve all the breaches you get. you are vile. enjoy your cancer and parkinson's (there's a couple shaky ones already), you baby killing fucks, you deserve it.

    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Friday May 19, @07:27PM

      by DannyB (5839) on Friday May 19, @07:27PM (#512312)

      Just wait until the next major cyber attack happens.

      Big Corporations will be screaming at their government servants for protecting government systems, but not protecting the systems belonging to the owners of the government. Then there will be bill to share vulnerabilities with the software developers -- hopefully including open source ones.

      I happen to think it is more important to defend against ${emeny} hacking us, even if it means we have trouble hacking ${enemy}.

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