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posted by Fnord666 on Wednesday July 05 2017, @01:36AM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the no-content-for-you! dept.

Submitted via IRC for TheMightyBuzzard

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a new law that will enable pirate mirror, proxy and other derivative sites to be blocked quickly by ISPs. Sites will be approved for blocking by the government and the local telecoms watchdog, and ISPs will be given 24 hours to block all access. Search engines will also be compelled to remove all variants from results.

Source: TorrentFreak


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  • (Score: 0, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:01AM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:01AM (#535018)

    Didn't know Russia needed a law to do that.

    • (Score: 1, Offtopic) by Fluffeh on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:48AM

      by Fluffeh (954) on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:48AM (#535030) Journal

      It probably doesn't. The law makes it MANDATORY however.

    • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @08:11AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @08:11AM (#535100)

      Perhaps because you are an idiot?

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:23AM (10 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:23AM (#535026)

    Russia now has a legal way to censor any side that allows users to post links.

    For example, suppose Russia wishes to block this site. They just have someone upload links to pirated content, then they can force ISPs and search engines to block it.

    This obviously can be used politically.

    It also provides a tool that makes it very easy for them to have scope creep. They are now one "think of the children" away from blocking any category of content they disprove of. Based on current politics there, I suspect they will go after the gays pretty soon.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:43AM (8 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:43AM (#535029)

      might be a dumb question, but to they block "piratebay.se" or do they block 104.31.16.3 ??

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:54AM (6 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:54AM (#535031)

        Why don't you go there and you tell us.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:58AM (5 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:58AM (#535034)

          See my kickstarter to raise the airfare...

          No, on second thought, maybe someone here actually knows some of these details, so I'll save a trip.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @03:07AM

            by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @03:07AM (#535039)

            Duh, hey! We have this global communication network called the internet. Why not use a Russian proxy in Russia to browse pirate sites and see what is blocked.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @03:09AM

            by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @03:09AM (#535040)

            This will get you started.

            http://www.gatherproxy.com/proxylist/country/?c=Russia [gatherproxy.com]

          • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @03:39AM

            by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @03:39AM (#535048)

            Yeah, I'll do it for you lazy sack of shit.

            NWTools.com tell me where I appear to be.

            "Russian Federation (RU) in region Eastern Europe"

            Visit ThePirateBay.org now.

            ThePirateBay Warning – Lawsuits & Huge fines in Russia

            Well FUCK ME. It works.

            This message coming at you from North America by way of some proxy in Russia and some other proxy in Germany.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @04:16AM (1 child)

            by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @04:16AM (#535053)

            Kickstarter, right? It's not your money. Make the trip, and drink some vodka. Not some old stale vodka that sat in a ship's hold for several weeks. You'll get to drink it like the Russians drink it, fresh out of the distillery.

            • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @04:45AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @04:45AM (#535057)

              Trump likes to drink vodka filtered through a Russian.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @10:54AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @10:54AM (#535133)

        Both. They could even block newer IPs automatically which recently led to hilarious results as someone bought unused (but still blocked) domains and wrote various IPs into their DNS data.

    • (Score: 4, Interesting) by n1 on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:59AM

      by n1 (993) on Wednesday July 05 2017, @02:59AM (#535036) Journal

      Internet censorship in the United Kingdom is conducted under a variety of laws, judicial processes, administrative regulations and voluntary arrangements. It is achieved by blocking access to sites as well as the use of laws that criminalise publication or possession of certain types of material.

      I wouldn't be surprised if some UK data/intelligence/consultancy firm helps them set up some new blocking and filtering systems to create a strong and stable Russia.

      I'm sure BAE is already trying to arrange some meetings.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_censorship_in_the_United_Kingdom [wikipedia.org]

      https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/jun/15/bae-mass-surveillance-technology-repressive-regimes [theguardian.com]

  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @07:31AM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @07:31AM (#535078)

    How are the circumvention efforts going? Are we making headway in preventing anybody from blocking anything? And what about about hiding the physical location of servers? Can we do it? For how long?

    See, instead of stories about censorship and state power, can anybody find stories about the tech needed and being used to get around the damage? Let's do that and rub the state's nose in it. Let's get this arms race going full blast. We are moving way too slowly. Let's render the state powerless. The goal must be unconditional surrender by whatever means possible. We must make the internet open to all. If we don't, the bad guys win.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @08:15AM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 05 2017, @08:15AM (#535102)

      How are the circumvention efforts going?

      There is a limit to circumvention, at least if you want random people to be able to connect, as opposed to a closed invite-only system. If people without previous connections are meant to be able to connect, they need a way to connect that can be openly communicated. But if it can be openly communicated, the state also knows how it is communicated, and can simply block that communication channel.

      The only way this can be avoided is if any feasible way to block the communication channel would do so much collateral damage that it is impossible in practice. What "too much collateral damage" means of course depends on the country.

      • (Score: 2) by kaszz on Wednesday July 05 2017, @12:35PM

        by kaszz (4211) on Wednesday July 05 2017, @12:35PM (#535152) Journal

        You do it by communicating openly only at random times for random IP-addresses. And by require people to first join a less privileged social circle where they have to prove their worth to advance to the next more connected circle. Just like people climb the ladder in corporations.

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