Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

SoylentNews is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop. Only 14 submissions in the queue.
posted by Fnord666 on Wednesday September 27, @09:09PM   Printer-friendly
from the no-youtube-for-you dept.

The Amazon Echo Show is an Alexa-powered voice assistant product that includes a touchscreen and a camera. Google has pulled support for YouTube on the device:

Google's popular video-sharing site appears to have disappeared from Amazon's device due to a dispute over how YouTube should work on the Echo Show. According to Amazon, Google pulled support for YouTube on the Echo Show on Tuesday afternoon:

Google made a change today at around 3 pm. YouTube used to be available to our shared customers on Echo Show. As of this afternoon, Google has chosen to no longer make YouTube available on Echo Show, without explanation and without notification to customers. There is no technical reason for that decision, which is disappointing and hurts both of our customers.

But Google accused Amazon of breaking its rules on the way YouTube is presented, adding that talks between the two companies haven't yielded a solution.

We've been in negotiations with Amazon for a long time, working towards an agreement that provides great experiences for customers on both platforms. Amazon's implementation of YouTube on the Echo Show violates our terms of service, creating a broken user experience. We hope to be able to reach an agreement and resolve these issues soon.

The move is likely related to YouTube functionality desktop users are used [to] that is lacking from the Echo Show, including being able to share, recommend and comment on videos.

Also at The Verge.


Original Submission

Related Stories

Google's "Manhattan" to Compete With Amazon's Echo Show 11 comments

Google's 'Manhattan project': Home device with a screen to compete with Echo Show

Google generally doesn't do as well when it builds "follower" products — think Google Plus or Allo. But there are other examples where Google has excelled with later entries (e.g., AdWords, Maps). Right now, Google Home is a follower product seeking to break out of Amazon Echo's shadow.

[...] Amazon now has two devices with screens: Echo Show and the new Echo Spot. According to TechCrunch, Google is also working on a Home device with a touchscreen:

Two sources confirm to TechCrunch that the Google device has been internally codenamed "Manhattan" and will have a similar screen size to the 7-inch Echo Show. One source received info directly from a Google employee. Both sources say the device will offer YouTube, Google Assistant, Google Photos and video calling. It will also act as a smart hub that can control Nest and other smart home devices.

Previously: Google Pulls YouTube off of the Amazon Echo Show


Original Submission

Voice-Powered Smart Speakers to be in 55% of U.S. Homes by 2022 22 comments

Voice-enabled smart speakers to reach 55% of U.S. households by 2022, says report

Adoption of voice-powered smart speakers is taking off. According to a new report from Juniper Research out this morning, smart devices like the Amazon Echo, Google Home and Sonos One will be installed in a majority – that is, 55 percent – of U.S. households by the year 2022. By that time, over 70 million households will have at least one of these smart speakers in their home, and the total number of installed devices will top 175 million.

The new forecast follows other reports pointing to growth in the voice-enabled speaker market, including one from eMarketer this spring which said that 35.6 million U.S. consumers would use a voice-activated device at least once per month in 2017, representing 128.9 percent growth over last year.

Despite the increased adoption of smart speakers with voice control capabilities, the new report points out that the majority of voice assistant usage won't be through these in-home devices. Instead, the most usage will occur on smartphones, with over 5 billion assistants installed on smartphones worldwide by 2022.

Amazon teaches Alexa Japanese for Echo's next destination

Amazon's Echo, Plus and Dot speakers will finally be available in Japan starting next week. To prepare for the devices' arrival in the island nation, the e-retail giant taught the voice assistant how to understand and respond in the Japanese language. Alexa SVP Tom Taylor said the company designed an all-new experience "from the ground up for Japanese customers, including a new Japanese voice, local knowledge and over 250 skills from Japanese developers."

Related: Amazon Dominates Voice-Controlled Speaker Market
Amazon is Working on Smart Glasses to House Alexa AI, Says FT
Google Pulls YouTube off of the Amazon Echo Show
Amazon's Alexa Adds Ability to Order from Best Buy


Original Submission

Google Pulls YouTube Off of More Amazon Devices 43 comments

Google pulls YouTube from Amazon devices, escalating spat

A rare public spat in the technology industry escalated on Tuesday when Google said it would block its video streaming application YouTube from two Amazon.com Inc devices and criticized the online retailer for not selling Google hardware.

[...] In a statement, Google said, "Amazon doesn't carry Google products like Chromecast and Google Home, doesn't make (its) Prime Video available for Google Cast users, and last month stopped selling some of (our sister company) Nest's latest products. "Given this lack of reciprocity, we are no longer supporting YouTube on Echo Show and Fire TV," Google said. "We hope we can reach an agreement to resolve these issues soon."

[...] Amazon said in a statement, "Google is setting a disappointing precedent by selectively blocking customer access to an open website." It said it hoped to resolve the issue with Google as soon as possible but customers could access YouTube through the internet - not an app - on the devices in the meantime.

Meanwhile, Amazon Prime Video has come to the Apple TV.

Also at The Verge and Variety.

Previously: Google Pulls YouTube off of the Amazon Echo Show
Google's "Manhattan" to Compete With Amazon's Echo Show


Original Submission

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough

Mark All as Read

Mark All as Unread

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
(1)
  • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 27, @09:09PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 27, @09:09PM (#574041)

    Back and Black. 🅳🅸🅲🅺 🅽🅸🅶🅶🅴🆁🆂.

    You know so we never fuck no old pussy.

    We fuck a hole lotta young pussy tho.

    🅳🅸🅲🅺 🅽🅸🅶🅶🅴🆁🆂 ain't gonna pull out til yo snatch be overflowin wit black hot nigger cum.

  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Rosco P. Coltrane on Wednesday September 27, @09:28PM (3 children)

    by Rosco P. Coltrane (4757) on Wednesday September 27, @09:28PM (#574049)

    Welcome to the world of cloud computing, where content is held hostage by a few greedy companies and customers are at their total mercy for access.

    Me, my movies, music, books and shit are downloaded once and hosted on my NAS. When Google has a fit of greediness, I still can access my content. Amazing concept eh?

    • (Score: 2) by ArhcAngel on Wednesday September 27, @09:52PM

      by ArhcAngel (654) on Wednesday September 27, @09:52PM (#574056)

      Same goes for Bezos and Amazon. I can happily stream Prime to my phone but the app "mysteriously" crashes when I try to run it on my Google TV device.

    • (Score: 2) by Pino P on Wednesday September 27, @11:45PM (1 child)

      by Pino P (4721) on Wednesday September 27, @11:45PM (#574101) Journal

      Me, my movies, music, books and shit are downloaded once and hosted on my NAS.

      But what protocol do your playback devices use to access your NAS? Because if your NAS makes features available through a built-in webserver, browsers won't let client-side scripts on cleartext HTTP pages use several features. Login pages over cleartext HTTP have a warning, Service Workers and Presentation API are already HTTPS-only, and there is persistent effort to make Fullscreen API HTTPS-only as well.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 30, @03:45PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 30, @03:45PM (#575300)

        This is what I ran into trying to write a skill for Alexa to stream the output from my MPD server over my Echo Dot. Basically, the only way around it would have been to pipe the output of MPD into an Icecast server set up with https, which is pretty terribly documented, because who bothers to encrypt an Icecast stream?

        I decided it wasn't worth the time and aggravation it was going to take and gave up...after all, it's not that hard to just tap a shortcut on my phone to get it all streaming right out of the same speakers. It does sort of beg the question of whether or not insisting on https ABSOLUTELY EVERYWHERE is really the best solution, however.

  • (Score: 2) by fyngyrz on Wednesday September 27, @09:41PM

    by fyngyrz (6567) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday September 27, @09:41PM (#574053) Homepage Journal

    Pretty sure the phrases "youtube customers" and "great experience" don't belong anywhere near each other without an intervening disclaimer carrying the approximate rhetorical force of a MOAB.

    How many advertisements do you want to click out of the way of the content today? How many web pages with completely unwanted and unwarranted auto-play? How many absolutely worthless comments?

    You want a great viewing experience?

    Go find a DVD or Bluray with the ability skip previews. If it doesn't offer that, try to return it with the complaint that it is inherently defective.

    That has at least some chance of providing a decent viewing experience. Sometimes. Otherwise... nope.

    --
    The eyes are the windows to the soul.
    Sunglasses are the window shades.
  • (Score: 2) by ArhcAngel on Wednesday September 27, @10:00PM (1 child)

    by ArhcAngel (654) on Wednesday September 27, @10:00PM (#574058)

    I just went to Amazon and they rolled out the fall https://www.amazon.com/b/?ie=UTF8&node=9818047011&ref_=fs_ods_fs_aucc_cp [amazon.com]Echo lineup and it looks like an all out assault on their partners. The new Echo Plus adds a smart hub eliminating the need for an external hub. And the Echo Spot looks like a round version of the Echo Show.

  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by Kawumpa on Wednesday September 27, @10:49PM (3 children)

    by Kawumpa (1187) on Wednesday September 27, @10:49PM (#574079)

    ...is that people still buy this shit. All of these companies are working really hard at reducing the internet to a transport layer for their incredibly limited appliances. Think about it, everybody used to have a computer that could be used to work, play games, listen to music, watch movies, communicate with friends, surf the web and access content from everyone anywhere. These days, you need apps, not necessarily available for your device, to access content, not necessarily available in your location. And unless you are quite tech savvy you will be bombarded with the stupidest and most annoying advertising conceivable. Best of all, you pay for it.

    • (Score: 2) by Pino P on Wednesday September 27, @11:48PM (1 child)

      by Pino P (4721) on Wednesday September 27, @11:48PM (#574103) Journal

      Think about it, everybody used to have a computer that could be used to work, play games, listen to music, watch movies, communicate with friends, surf the web and access content from everyone anywhere. These days, you need apps, not necessarily available for your device

      Even if you have a desktop or laptop computer, an app might not be available for your computer. For example, a Mac-only app won't be (legally) running on a Dell, HP, or home-built computer.

      to access content, not necessarily available in your location

      Even in the DVD era, when owning a desktop or laptop computer with an optical drive was expected, DVD players and DVD-ROM drives still enforced DVD region coding.

      • (Score: 3, Informative) by LoRdTAW on Thursday September 28, @07:04PM

        by LoRdTAW (3755) Subscriber Badge on Thursday September 28, @07:04PM (#574490) Journal

        Even if you have a desktop or laptop computer, an app might not be available for your computer. For example, a Mac-only app won't be (legally) running on a Dell, HP, or home-built computer.

        Ah! But that's the beauty of the PC platform: You can run whatever you want. Legal or not. There are no rules about side loading, app stores, and allowed channels. You download and install anything you want from the benign to outright malicious. Virtual machines, emulators, compatibility layers. Try that on your mobile iDevice. Even MacOS and Windows are looking to move to app stores and locking down the PC.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 30, @03:54PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 30, @03:54PM (#575308)

      So, it might be worth remembering that people can own more than one device. I've got a general purpose desktop in the living room (the TV is one of the monitors), and a laptop in the bedroom, and they do anything and everything I feel like making them do, including host my own media for streaming to my phone or wherever else so as to avoid the likes of Spotify, youtube, etc. That all said, I've also got an Echo Dot, which is a lot easier and faster to interface with while I'm throwing on shoes running out the door in the morning to check the weather or the day's news than the general purpose computer would be.

      These absolutely ARE appliances, and frankly, they're better than the appliances that do similar jobs without the Internet functionality (home weather stations come to mind). It's not a matter of reducing the Internet to this task, but using it for this task...along with the rest.

      As for the people who ARE getting these instead of a computer, well, fine, I'd say that sounds silly to me. That said, they sound like people who probably spent more time fighting with their computer and nagging their nerd friends to fix it for them than they ever did using it in the first place.

  • (Score: 1) by spaceman375 on Wednesday September 27, @11:26PM

    by spaceman375 (6166) on Wednesday September 27, @11:26PM (#574091)

    "...share, recommend and comment on videos." Not even slightly. It's all about the Echo Show not showing ads.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 28, @04:33AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 28, @04:33AM (#574213)

    As a paying customer of both companies and also a human being, I have to say that Google is much more annoying. The hypocrisy of their "don't be evil" motto becomes more obvious every day. Meanwhile, Amazon has always been a regular money-making business without moral pretensions.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 28, @02:43PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 28, @02:43PM (#574359)

      They haven't had "don't be evil" as their unofficial motto for quite a few years now.

(1)