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posted by mrpg on Wednesday October 11, @04:00AM   Printer-friendly
from the how-many-do-you-need dept.

Seagate has launched three new 12 TB helium-filled hard disk drives containing eight perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) platters:

These are not the first 12TB drives in the market, as enterprise versions from both Seagate and Western Digital have been around for some time. However, Seagate is the first vendor to bring down the prices and ship 12TB drives in the consumer market.

From a hardware viewpoint, the three drives are similar to the Seagate Enterprise Capacity v7 drives launched in March 2017. All of them features eight PMR platters with a 923 Gb/in2 areal density in a sealed enclosure filled with helium. That said, the Barracuda Pro Compute, meant for desktop use, doesn't come with rotational vibration (RV) sensors or dual-plane motor balancing hardware. The RV sensors and the dual-plane balance / AgileArray features enable reliable performance in multi-drive enclosures. The other important differentiation aspects include firmware features, warranty / workload ratings, and value-added services like the Seagate Rescue Data Recovery.

Two of the drives come with 5 year warranties.

Previously: HGST Announces 10 Terabyte PMR Hard Drive
AnandTech Interview With Seagate's CTO: New HDD Technologies Coming
Seagate's 12 TB HDDs Are in Use, and 16 TB is Planned for 2018
Western Digital Begins Shipping 12 TB Helium-Filled Drives with 8 Platters
Seagate HAMR Hard Drives Coming in a Year and a Half
Glass Substrate Could Enable Hard Drives With 12 Platters


Original Submission

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HGST Announces 10 Terabyte PMR Hard Drive 14 comments

HGST, a division of Western Digital, has announced its second 10 terabyte helium-filled hard drive. The Ultrastar Archive Ha10 , announced back in June, was a shingled magnetic recording (SMR) drive. Now HGST has launched the Ultrastar He10, a 10 TB helium-filled HDD using traditional perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR). With a total of 7 platters, each platter stores around 1.43 TB. AnandTech reports:

Hard drives are struggling to reach the 10TB capacity point with traditional PMR technology. While Seagate did announce a few 8TB PMR drives earlier this quarter, it really looks like vendors need to move to some other technology (shingled magnetic recording or heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR)) in order to keep the $/TB metric competitive against the upcoming high-capacity SSDs. As of now, helium seems to be the only proven solution causing minimal performance impact and HGST appears to have a strong hold in this particular market segment.

Ars Technica has some speculation about the price:

There's no price listed for the Ultrastar He10, but it'll probably cost about £600/$800. The first helium-filled drives were extortionately expensive, but the He8 is now down to around £400/$550, which isn't bad for an enterprise drive (these things have a 5-year warranty and other such niceties, too). Seagate's shingled 8TB drive is much cheaper (£170/$200), but you get a shorter warranty and less enterprisey stuff.


Original Submission

AnandTech Interview With Seagate's CTO: New HDD Technologies Coming 17 comments

AnandTech interviewed Mark Re, SVP and Chief Technology Officer of Seagate, to talk about plans for upcoming hard disk drive (HDD) technologies.

Although shingled magnetic recording (SMR) lowers write speeds, a number of techniques help reduce the impact, such as banding together SMR tracks into certain zones with perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) zones covering the rest of the drive rather than shingling, or adding more SLC NAND and DRAM cache. Seagate will be expanding its use of SMR to increase density in client drives, not just "cold storage" drives, but will be using partial SMR/partial PMR and caching in order to mitigate write performance issues.

For the moment, Seagate won't be using helium outside of products for capacity-demanding datacenter customers (such as the Seagate Enterprise Capacity 10 TB HDD). The company can reduce fluid flow forces inside air-filled HDDs using purely mechanical solutions. On the other hand, Western Digital has introduced helium-filled drives aimed at consumers and has a marketing name for its technology (HelioSeal).

[Continues...]

Seagate's 12 TB HDDs Are in Use, and 16 TB is Planned for 2018 9 comments

Seagate claims that it has had 12 terabyte hard disk drives "in the field" for "several quarters", and that 14 TB and 16 TB drives are coming soon. The company has a goal of producing 20 TB hard drives by 2020:

The enterprise is also moving en masse to speedy SSDs for high-performance workloads, which recently led the company to halt further development of 15K HDDs. Many analysts opine that 10K HDDs are next on the chopping block. In response, Seagate shifted its production might to more lucrative high-capacity enterprise HDDs, which now account for 37% of its revenue, to leverage the shrinking HDD price-per-GB advantage over SSDs. Seagate recently closed its Suzhou, China manufacturing plant to reduce manufacturing costs, but it simultaneously increased its investments in other facilities to address the challenges of moving from six platters per drive to eight. The net effects of its maneuverings total $300 million in savings per year.

Seagate is essentially retreating into the high-capacity segment, and the company announced that its new 12TB HDDs have already been shipping to key customers for several quarters. Seagate CEO Steve Luczoalso noted that the company would offer 16TB drives within the next 12 to 18 months. Seagate's new high-capacity offerings are destined for data centers, NAS, DVRs, and a booming surveillance market.

Also at Ars Technica and The Verge.

Previously: Western Digital Announces 12-14 TB Hard Drives and an 8 TB SSD


Original Submission

Western Digital Begins Shipping 12 TB Helium-Filled Drives with 8 Platters 12 comments

Western Digital is shipping 12 TB helium-filled hard disk drives containing eight 1.5 TB platters:

Western Digital on Wednesday announced that it had begun to ship its HGST Ultrastar He12 hard drives with 12 TB of capacity. The HDDs are the first drives to employ eight platters, so the fact that Western Digital is now shipping them is important not only for its datacenter customers who need massive storage capacities, but also because the drive represents a significant step forward from a technology point of view.

The HGST Ultrastar He12 is based on Western Digital's fourth-generation HelioSeal technology, which uses eight perpendicular magnetic recording platters with 1.5 TB capacity each. To add the eighth platter, Western Digital had to redesign internal components of its HDDs (including arms and heads) significantly. In addition, the company increased areal density of the platters, which improved the sequential read/write performance of the new hard drives. In particular, Western Digital claims that the HGST Ultrastar He12 has a sustained transfer rate of 255 MB/s, an average latency of 4.16 ms, as well as an average seek time of around 8 ms.

Previously: Western Digital Announces 12-14 TB Hard Drives and an 8 TB SSD
Seagate's 12 TB HDDs Are in Use, and 16 TB is Planned for 2018


Original Submission

Seagate HAMR Hard Drives Coming in a Year and a Half 9 comments

When will the HAMR drop? Supposedly in late 2018:

Seagate last week made two rather important announcements regarding its current and upcoming hard drives. First, the company said that it had shipped 35 million HDDs based on shingled magnetic recording (SMR) technology. Second, the manufacturer confirmed plans to launch commercial hard drives based on its heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) technology by the end of 2018, the first time the company set a precise launch timeframe for such HDDs.

[...] This is not the first time that Seagate has made a HAMR-related announcement, but this is the first time when the company has set a particular launch timeframe for such drives. Previously, Seagate has implied that the first HAMR-based HDDs would feature a capacity of 16 TB, which is a significant increase from 12 TB hard drives due to be released in the coming weeks. Given the fact that data centers cry out for high-capacity drives, it is inevitable that HAMR-based HDDs with increased performance and higher capacities will be in high demand. Keeping in mind that late 2018 (by "late" companies usually mean the fourth quarter) is over a year away, Seagate is not sharing details about experimental deployments of HAMR-based HDDs that may be planned for 2017/early 2018.

An upcoming Western Digital 14 TB 3.5" HDD will store 1.75 TB per platter.


Original Submission

Glass Substrate Could Enable Hard Drives With 12 Platters 67 comments

Using a glass substrate instead of aluminum could allow 12 platters to be crammed into a 3.5" hard disk drive enclosure:

Even if many modern systems eschew classic hard drive storage designs in favor of solid state alternatives, there are still a number of companies working on improving the technology. One of those is Hoya, which is currently prototyping glass substrates for hard drive platters of the future which could enable the production of drives with as much as 20TB of storage space.

Hard drive platters are traditionally produced using aluminum substrates. While these substrates have enabled many modern advances in hard drive technology, glass substrates can be made with similar densities, but can be much thinner, leading to higher capacity storage drives. Hoya has already managed the creation of substrates as thin as 0.381mm, which is close to half the thickness of existing high-density drives.

In one cited example, an existing 12-terabyte drive from Western Digital was made up of eight platters. Hoya believes that by decreasing the thickness of the platters through its glass technology, it could fit as many as 12 inside a 3.5 inch hard drive casing. That would enable up to 18TB of storage space in a single drive (thanks Nikkei).

When that is blended with a technology known as "shingled magnetic recording," 20TB should be perfectly achievable.

Toshiba is reportedly planning to release a 14 TB helium-filled hard drive by the end of the year.

Also at Network World.


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 11, @05:06AM (9 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 11, @05:06AM (#580296)

    Wow I could hold all my porn and all of your porn on one drive :)
    No more searching for the right drive

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Wednesday October 11, @05:11AM (6 children)

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Wednesday October 11, @05:11AM (#580299) Journal

      But you'll want to keep the data in (panty) RAID.

      --
      [SIG] 04/14/2017: Soylent Upgrade v13 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 2) by maxwell demon on Wednesday October 11, @09:04AM

        by maxwell demon (1608) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday October 11, @09:04AM (#580354) Journal

        Redundant Array of Independent Dicks?

        --
        The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
      • (Score: 2) by VLM on Wednesday October 11, @12:00PM (4 children)

        by VLM (445) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday October 11, @12:00PM (#580406)

        That brings up an interesting point, vmware VSAN for example does NOT support disks larger than 2TB to keep restoral times sane and so forth.

        I never really expected to see the bifurcation go this extreme. There was a pre-SSD era where people needing speed (database array, etc) would get an array of relatively large number of relatively small disks to get crazy total theoretical bandwidth.

        Personally I wish 10G ethernet was dropping in price as fast as disk capacity. Its still vaguely "a hundred bucks per port" on managed switches. I have a cluster with 6 hosts in my basement and two 10G ports (so I can have a 20G LAG) and I'll eventually drop 1500 or whatever on the switch for it but I have better things to blow $1500 on in the meantime. Like more RAM, etc.

        • (Score: 2) by opinionated_science on Wednesday October 11, @12:06PM (3 children)

          by opinionated_science (4031) on Wednesday October 11, @12:06PM (#580408)

          10G switches might be expensive, but 10G ports are cheap.

          A colleague pointed out the intel D class that has 2 of them....

          • (Score: 2) by VLM on Wednesday October 11, @03:11PM (2 children)

            by VLM (445) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday October 11, @03:11PM (#580504)

            I agree you can get Supermicro E200 with two 10G ports for just a couple hundred bucks, plus all the other server stuff. My basement kinda resembles that in fact. And I know you can buy full size desktop cards with immense heatsinks for like $50.

            The cost seems to be the bus. The biggest PCI-Express MB I can think of had 8 slots. Speed doesn't matter because even the oldest PCI-E had way more bandwidth than a card can generate. I "need" 12 ports aka 12 cards aka 12 slots on a motherboard running linux and some bridge software to emulate a switch.

            Home labs are kinda like ham radio where there's a zillion levels and people laugh at the layers beneath them and think one level up is insane and where they are is just right.

            Given the above line, I've been thinking about skipping 10G and being the most alpha-tech I know by installing used 40G infiniband gear from ebay. No one I know IRL has infiniband in their basement so I guess it would be bragging rights. Even if half of what I buy is DOA it would still be cheaper than buying into 10G. I mean $600 gets me 36 managed (admittedly, used) ports of 40G QDR infiniband. Its just mindblowing that even if I have to buy two because one is broken, its still cheaper than the new 16 port 10G switch I was looking into.

            Hardware compatibility is likely the killer. My 10G ports came up with one line installation of a VIB and "just work" on vmware esx but I can only do pt-pt links I don't have a $1700 switch. On the other hand infiniband would be vastly cheaper and faster, but the headache of getting that stuff working, I donno.

            Also my cute little server cases have risers that would hold an infiniband card but I'd have to rip out some guts and go full on SAN / NAS whereas kinda the point of faster networking is better vsan. Still imagine FT-logging or vmotion running over 40G infiniband instead of 1G ethernet.... I think there's CPU sockets that don't have 40G bandwidth, crazy stuff. FT performance is probably pretty good when your network is faster than your CPU socket LOL.

            Of course if I'm willing to put up with used equiment BS, I could get a used 10G 16 port switch for less than $1700 new... Lots of decisions to make...

            • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Wednesday October 11, @06:29PM (1 child)

              by bob_super (1357) on Wednesday October 11, @06:29PM (#580664)

              My FPGA eval board can easily run 100G as 25G x 4.
              My biggest problem is I don't have enough HD cameras in my house to justify that much bandwidth. Maybe I should register for AirBnB

              • (Score: 2) by VLM on Friday October 13, @12:07PM

                by VLM (445) Subscriber Badge on Friday October 13, @12:07PM (#581704)

                justify that much bandwidth

                Get into virtualization and nothing is too much. FT essentially uses the network to keep two images sync'd over the network so if one host fails the other takes over basically instantly. vmotion moves a snapshot of the entire memory and processor state of an image from one hardware machine to another ideally instantly in practice it would be nice to reduce the slowdown/stop from dozen seconds to one or so. My media server talks to its SAN over ethernet, in theory 100meg FE is fast enough to stream, but tasks like indexing benefit from "network is faster than most local storage" type speeds.

    • (Score: 2) by stretch611 on Wednesday October 11, @07:16AM (1 child)

      by stretch611 (6199) on Wednesday October 11, @07:16AM (#580326)

      All your porn on one 12TB drive?!?

      You obviously don't have enough porn.

      • (Score: 3, Funny) by maxwell demon on Wednesday October 11, @09:03AM

        by maxwell demon (1608) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday October 11, @09:03AM (#580353) Journal

        You obviously don't have enough porn.

        Probably that's why he wants to have yours as well.

        --
        The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
  • (Score: 2) by captain normal on Wednesday October 11, @05:38AM

    by captain normal (2205) on Wednesday October 11, @05:38AM (#580303)

    "... have been around for some time..."
    Yeah...for at least 6 months.

  • (Score: 4, Informative) by lx on Wednesday October 11, @05:58AM

    by lx (1915) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday October 11, @05:58AM (#580309)

    For those who don't know about perpendicular magnetic recording here's a video from 2005 explaining the process:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xb_PyKuI7II [youtube.com]

  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by bzipitidoo on Wednesday October 11, @12:55PM (2 children)

    by bzipitidoo (4388) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday October 11, @12:55PM (#580435) Journal

    My own personal experience is that hard drive quality has declined over the last 10 years. I have no working hard drives between the ages of 3 to 10 years because they all (all 3 of them) failed. All my hard drives older than 10 years still work.

    2 of those failures were WD, one in just 9 months and the other in 3 years, and I hear that Seagate is worse. It's gotten a lot harder to change brands, with only 3 left. Am now using a Toshiba HD, and SSDs.

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by HiThere on Wednesday October 11, @05:42PM

      by HiThere (866) on Wednesday October 11, @05:42PM (#580617)

      My personal interpretation of my personal experience is:
      Each new technology that increases storage density is fragile when it comes out. The ones that are successful tend to become less fragile over time. This doesn't mean they ever become as rugged as the earlier versions that stored data with much less density.

      I still trust backups to CDs more than backups to DVDs, but DVDs are a lot more convenient when backing up a large amount of data. And USB drives are even more convenient...but I don't trust them as much. I still don't trust flash drives for anything archival.

      --
      Put not your faith in princes.
    • (Score: 2) by LoRdTAW on Wednesday October 11, @06:27PM

      by LoRdTAW (3755) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday October 11, @06:27PM (#580663) Journal

      I have had pretty good luck with hard drives over the years. Cars on the other hand...

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 11, @01:31PM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 11, @01:31PM (#580448)

    I think such info would always make a great addition to TFS. Because many things are interesting, if the price is right.

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Wednesday October 11, @04:34PM

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Wednesday October 11, @04:34PM (#580557) Journal

      AnandTech originally said $390-440, but they changed it to $470-540.

      Pretty high for a consumer-oriented drive, but it will drop.

      It would be nice to see 6-12 TB eventually populate the lower price points ($100-200), displacing 4-8 TB drives.

      --
      [SIG] 04/14/2017: Soylent Upgrade v13 [soylentnews.org]
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 11, @08:41PM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 11, @08:41PM (#580789)

    So much data to lose to a single drive failure...

    BTW, is there any RAID scheme at all that is without the potential risk of a second drive failure during replication to a new drive at these sizes?

  • (Score: 1) by corey on Thursday October 12, @10:04AM (1 child)

    by corey (2202) on Thursday October 12, @10:04AM (#581060)

    I thought there was a worldwide shortage of helium? I always sneer when I see helium balloons at the hardware stores but my daughter loves them.

    I guess helium was cheaper than other noble gases.

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Wednesday October 18, @11:14PM

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Wednesday October 18, @11:14PM (#584239) Journal

      The amount used in hard drives is negligible compared to other applications. The largest use [wikipedia.org] is as a coolant for superconducting magnets.

      1. Look at a hard drive with the case taken off and all the components showing. Think of how little empty volume there is to cram helium in.
      2. Now look at the warranty. The sealed system is designed to work for at least 5 years.
      3. Compare to the volume of a kid's party balloon that deflates after ONE DAY.

      Not such a big deal anymore, is it?

      Helium is untrapped out of the Earth as a byproduct of natural gas production, but could be vented into the atmosphere and lost right at that point without an economic incentive. The U.S. government has bought helium to stick into the Strategic Helium Reserve.

      World’s helium problem may have just gotten solved [usatoday.com]

      --
      [SIG] 04/14/2017: Soylent Upgrade v13 [soylentnews.org]
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