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posted by takyon on Sunday October 22, @12:00PM   Printer-friendly
from the linked-infielder dept.

LinkedIn CEO: Company Open To Original Shows, Streaming NFL

LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner says they are not pivoting to video as several social media and news media outlets have recently done, but the company is open to buying and developing original shows.

[...] He noted that shows similar to ABC's "Shark Tank" could potentially do very well with its business and networking minded users.

[...] Weiner also expressed interest in pursuing deals with professional sports leagues such as the NFL or NBA.

Also at GeekWire and MSPoweruser.

Previously: Microsoft to Buy LinkedIn for $26.2 Billion in Cash
LinkedIn Apologizes for Attempted Privacy Breach
LinkedIn Cannot Prevent Access to Public Profiles


Original Submission

Related Stories

Microsoft to Buy LinkedIn for $26.2 Billion in Cash 49 comments

Microsoft will buy LinkedIn for $196 per share, or about $26.2 billion. The respective companies' boards are alleged to have unanimously approved the sale. LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner will keep his title and report to Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. It is claimed that LinkedIn will continue to operate as an independent brand.

Reuters, CNBC, USA Today, WSJ, NYT.

It's quick and easy to delete your Linked-In account in ten steps.

LinkedIn Apologizes for Attempted Privacy Breach 20 comments

LinkedIn apologizes for trying to sneak in a new update that informed some iPhone users, without further explanation, that their "app" would begin sharing their data with nearby users.

The update prompted outrage on Twitter after cybersecurity expert Rik Ferguson received a strange alert when he opened the resume app to read a new message: "LinkedIn would like to make data available to nearby Bluetooth devices even when you're not using the app."
That gave Ferguson, vice president of research at the cybersecurity firm Trend Micro, a handful of concerns, he told Vocativ. Among them: "the lack of specificity, which data, when, under what conditions, to which devices, why does it need to happen when I'm not using the app, what are the benefits to me, where is the feature announcement and explanation, why wasn't it listed in the app update details."

A mobile app asking for additional permissions isn't a novel occurrence, but broad requests are often met with skepticism from privacy advocates and security researchers. Many shopping apps, for instance, leave a user's bluetooth connection turned on, allowing marketers to track you as you enter a store and linger near certain products.
Reached for comment, LinkedIn said it's a mistake — that some iPhone users were accidentally subject to undeveloped test feature the company is still working on.

My take on how it would work is that whenever you come into the range of another computerphone with bluetooth active — which for class 2 is 10 meters (33 ft) — the LinkedIn app would pop up a quick summary of each other's resume.

Perfect for those times when you visit a big meeting with people A and their LinkedIn app show you just recently had a gig with corporation B that they really hate. As for apologizing, do remember that large corporations only retreat if the alternative hurts economically. For background information it might be good to know that LinkedIn was bought in 2016 by Microsoft, which happens to be very much in on the phone-home theme. Now if Tinder would auto-share in the same manner the various habits with any nearby phone during family gatherings, that would be a real hilarious circus starter.


Original Submission

LinkedIn Cannot Prevent Access to Public Profiles 18 comments

Reuters has an update on the ongoing court battle between LinkedIn and hiQ Labs, and has issued a preliminary injunction stating that LinkedIn cannot prevent a startup from accessing public profile data

U.S. District Judge Edward Chen in San Francisco granted a preliminary injunction request brought by hiQ Labs, and ordered LinkedIn to remove within 24 hours any technology preventing hiQ from accessing public profiles.

The case is considered to have implications beyond LinkedIn and hiQ Labs and could dictate just how much control companies have over publicly available data that is hosted on their services.

There is additional background to this case from an earlier atricle at Ars Technica. TLDR version; HiQ scrapes data from public LinkedIn profiles, and then sells analysis of this data to relevant employers. LinkedIn claimed HiQ's access was not allowed and HiQ violated the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act as a result. HiQ sued, asking the courts to rule that they were operating legally.

Also at The BBC, with more details and background.


Original Submission

Microsoft Adds LinkedIn Resume Assistant Feature to Office 365 20 comments

Microsoft is integrating LinkedIn with Word:

Writing and updating your résumé is a task that few of us enjoy. Microsoft is hoping to make it a little less painful with a new feature coming to Word called Resume Assistant.

Resume Assistant will detect that you're writing a résumé and offer insights and suggestions culled from LinkedIn. LinkedIn is a vast repository of both résumés and job openings and lets you see how other people describe their skillsets and which skills employers are looking for.

The feature will also show job openings that are suitable for your résumé directly within Word, putting résumé writers directly in contact with recruiters.

The feature is now available to a select few Office 365 subscribers:

Resume Assistant is available today to Office 365 subscribers as part of the Insiders program and those subscribers must have the latest version of Word on Windows. It will be generally available to Office 365/Microsoft 365 subscribers "in the coming months." Resume Assistant will be available in all Office 365 commercial and consumer plans, a Microsoft spokesperson confirmed.

Error: No jobs were found to be suitable based on your résumé. You are overqualified and too old.

How to Land a Dream Job With Microsoft Resume Assistant

Step 1: Lie.

Related: Microsoft to Buy LinkedIn for $26.2 Billion in Cash
LinkedIn Introduces "Open Candidates" Feature to Help Employees Look for a Better Job
LinkedIn Apologizes for Attempted Privacy Breach
LinkedIn Mulls Producing Videos; May Buy Rights From Sports Leagues


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 22, @12:05PM (3 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 22, @12:05PM (#585937)

    Does anyone know how to visit the site and see public profiles without logging in?

    lately, no matter the browser or source ip address, i get blocked by an authentication wall that prompts me to log in

    i just want to see more about the recruiter that emailed or texted me. it i am the product then at least let me see who is trying to make me their bitch

    i dont want to signal intent or draw unwanted attention. maybe that ship has sailed.

    ms buying them really should have prompted me to delete the account, but that is not good for anyone that may feasibly try to switch jobs at some point... it is very hard to tell what companies rely on it even if i dont

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 22, @03:27PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 22, @03:27PM (#585965)

      If you want to enjoy rich web content, you will have to log in and activate javascript, etc like any other modern person.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 23, @04:23PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 23, @04:23PM (#586391)

        Hmm, I can't help but to think: If you want to be an attractive wage-slave, you will have to log in and activate javascript, etc like any other attractive wage-slave, so that they can harvest your precious bodily... telemetry.

    • (Score: 4, Insightful) by Gaaark on Sunday October 22, @03:32PM

      by Gaaark (41) Subscriber Badge on Sunday October 22, @03:32PM (#585966) Homepage Journal

      I was on linkdin for about 3 days, then realized it was just facebook for people who use facebook but need to have more socializing.

      If i was an employer, i would NOT use linkin to hire. I'd rather pick names randomly from the phone book:

      "Let's see.... Navin Johnson. He looks like a good target-- for hiring, of course... yes...."

      --
      --- That's not flying: that's... falling... with more luck than I have. ---
  • (Score: 2) by looorg on Sunday October 22, @04:19PM (1 child)

    by looorg (578) on Sunday October 22, @04:19PM (#585977)

    What? I know I don't understand this whole social-media thing. But Linkedin started out as some kind of professional job-seeking website. Then Microsoft bought them for about $26B and now they are transitioning them into a original show streamer as a side-business to their social-networking-job-whatever-site? Sure, makes perfect sense. Nothing says you can't look for a new job as you also watch some NFL streams or some original dramas while you are doing it ... perhaps the shows could connect into the site so it could be about looking for a new job. They could call it BUMS ... or 'the unemployable'.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 23, @03:35AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 23, @03:35AM (#586154)

      Yeah, it started as a networking site for professionals, the premise being that if A knows B and B knows C, A could ask to be connected to C due to both knowing B. At least that was the non-paying environment.

      This was pre-facebook, even myspace. I believe friendster was the social network of that time. It was a place to present yourself professionally, to build your personal professional network, and to show interest in looking for a new job without going through obviously scummier sites like monster.

      Later they developed more social network functions, I guess that were only used for professional backslapping, and the site became progressively more difficult to log in to and use. I think I last logged in like 2 years ago to eject someone from my network. By now I don't think I need to advertise myself professionally online anymore.

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