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posted by martyb on Monday November 13, @07:06AM   Printer-friendly
from the glam-shots dept.

ALMA's image of red giant star gives a surprising glimpse of the sun's future

A team of astronomers led by Wouter Vlemmings, Chalmers University of Technology, have used the [Atacama Large Millimeter Array] to make the sharpest observations yet of a star with the same starting mass as the Sun. The new images show for the first time details on the surface of the red giant W Hydrae, 320 light years distant in the constellation of Hydra, the Water Snake. W Hydrae is an example of an AGB (asymptotic giant branch) star. Such stars are cool, bright, old and lose mass via stellar winds. The name derives from their position on the famous Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, which classifies stars according to their brightness and temperature.

[...] Alma's images provide the clearest view yet of the surface of a red giant with a similar mass to the Sun. Earlier sharp images have shown details on much more massive, red supergiant stars like Betelgeuse and Antares. The observations have also surprised the scientists. The presence of an unexpectedly compact and bright spot provides evidence that the star has surprisingly hot gas in a layer above the star's surface: a chromosphere. "Our measurements of the bright spot suggest there are powerful shock waves in the star's atmosphere that reach higher temperatures than are predicted by current theoretical models for AGB stars," says Theo Khouri, astronomer at Chalmers and member of the team. An alternative possibility is at least as surprising: that the star was undergoing a giant flare when the observations were made.

Other best-ever images of stars. W Hydrae is the 7th brightest star in the night sky.

The shock-heated atmosphere of an asymptotic giant branch star resolved by ALMA (DOI: 10.1038/s41550-017-0288-9) (DX)

Previously: Very Large Telescope Interferometer Captures Best Ever Image of Another Star (Antares)


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Very Large Telescope Interferometer Captures Best Ever Image of Another Star (Antares) 14 comments

The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) has captured the best ever image of another star. The VLTI was used to image the surface of Antares, a red supergiant star about 550 light years away in the heart of the constellation Scorpius (The Scorpion):

The VLTI is a unique facility that can combine the light from up to four telescopes, either the 8.2-metre Unit Telescopes, or the smaller Auxiliary Telescopes, to create a virtual telescope equivalent to a single mirror up to 200 metres across. This allows it to resolve fine details far beyond what can be seen with a single telescope alone.

[...] Using the new results the team has created the first two-dimensional velocity map of the atmosphere of a star other than the Sun. They did this using the VLTI with three of the Auxiliary Telescopes and an instrument called AMBER to make separate images of the surface of Antares over a small range of infrared wavelengths. The team then used these data to calculate the difference between the speed of the atmospheric gas at different positions on the star and the average speed over the entire star. This resulted in a map of the relative speed of the atmospheric gas across the entire disc of Antares — the first ever created for a star other than the Sun..

The astronomers found turbulent, low-density gas much further from the star than predicted, and concluded that the movement could not result from convection, that is, from large-scale movement of matter which transfers energy from the core to the outer atmosphere of many stars. They reason that a new, currently unknown, process may be needed to explain these movements in the extended atmospheres of red supergiants like Antares.

Vigorous atmospheric motion in the red supergiant star Antares (DOI: 10.1038/nature23445) (DX)


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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 13, @07:55AM (5 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 13, @07:55AM (#596090)

    They leave me feeling like either I'm an idiot, or the author is an asshat.

    Every time.

    • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 13, @08:27AM (4 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 13, @08:27AM (#596097)

      My tip is to bet on the first.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 13, @08:56AM (3 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 13, @08:56AM (#596108)

        ... we index based on zero.

        • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Monday November 13, @09:04AM (2 children)

          by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Monday November 13, @09:04AM (#596112)

          Nitpicking - first is first no matter which index you start with.
          E.g. sort an array ascendingly and the first element will contain the minimum irrespective what index you assign to it.

          • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Monday November 13, @07:00PM

            by bob_super (1357) on Monday November 13, @07:00PM (#596374)

            For the last year, I've had a feeling that many people, who care deeply about sorting values, have serious endianess issues.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday November 14, @01:10AM

            by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday November 14, @01:10AM (#596593)

            You should call the initial element the zeroth element.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 13, @07:03PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 13, @07:03PM (#596376)

    until next time

  • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Monday November 13, @07:06PM

    by bob_super (1357) on Monday November 13, @07:06PM (#596378)

    Now that we can see the star pretty precisely, we just need to find a 9th-level Wizard to get us there...
    Too bad they were outlawed by people trying to protect SLS pork.

  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by dierdorf on Monday November 13, @09:55PM

    by dierdorf (5887) on Monday November 13, @09:55PM (#596495) Homepage

    Well,W Hyd is the 7th brightest star if you happen to have superpowers and can see in the Infrared. For us mere mortals it isn't visible at all, having visual magnitude which varies from about +6 to +10 or so. (It's a "Mira" variable, which pulsates. At its largest diameter, almost ALL its energy is emitted in the infrared. The brighter Mira stars just periodically "go out" to the naked eye, which is how the prototype Omicron Ceti was given the name "Mira", The Wonderful. It was the first star proven to be a variable; before that stars were assumed to be of fixed brightness.) BTW, the more or less second naked-eye variable star to be recorded was called Algol, i.e., al-Ghoul, the monster.

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