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posted by mrpg on Sunday February 11 2018, @10:56AM   Printer-friendly
from the vetinari dept.

VideoLAN has released version 3.0.0 of the VLC media player for Windows, Linux, BSD, Android, and macOS. The new version is billed as enabling hardware decoded playback of 4K, 8K, and 360-degree video (in a demonstration video, VLC 3.0.0 is shown playing 8K 48fps 360-degree video on a Samsung Galaxy S8).

3.0.0 adds support for (not exhaustive):

Linux/BSD default video output is now OpenGL, instead of Xvideo.

The 3.0.x branch of VLC will be maintained as long-term support versions and will be the last releases on Windows XP (with significant limitations), Vista, macOS 10.7, 10.8 & 10.9, iOS 7 & 8, Android 2.x, 3.x, 4.0.x & 4.1.x, and the last to run on compilers before gcc 5.0 and clang 3.4, or equivalent.

From VLC Android developer Geoffrey Métais's blog post about the release, which discusses why Chromecast support took so long to add, as well as other missing features that have now been added to the Android version:

Chromecast support is everywhere and VLC took years to get it, right, but there are plenty of good reasons for it:

First of all, VideoLAN is a nonprofit organization and not a company. There are few developers paid for making VLC, most of them do it in their free time. That's how you get VLC for free and without any ads!

Also, VLC is 100% Open Source and Chromecast SDK isn't: We had to develop our very own Chromecast stack by ourselves. This is also why there is no voice actions for VLC (except with Android Auto), [and] we cannot use Google Play Services.

Furthermore, Chromecast is not designed to play local video files: When you watch a Youtube video, your phone is just a remote controller, nothing more. Chromecast streams the video from youtube.com. That's where it becomes complicated, Chromecast only supports very few codecs number, let's say h264. Google ensures that your video is encoded in h264 format on youtube.com, so streaming is simple. With VLC, you have media of any format. So VLC has to be a http server like youtube.com, and provide the video in a Chromecast compatible format. And of course in real time, which is challenging on Android because phones are less powerful than computers.

At last, VLC was not designed to display a video on another screen. It took time to properly redesign VLC to nicely support it. The good news is we did not make a Chromecast specific support, it is generic renderers: in the next months we can add UPnP support for example, to cast on any UPnP box or TV!

Also at The Verge and Tom's Hardware.

Related: Stable Release of VLC 1.0 for Android
VLC 2.0 for Android Released
EU Offers Cash Bounties to Improve the Security of VLC Media Player
Google Won't Take Down Pirate VLC With 5M Downloads (Update: They Have Taken it Down)


Original Submission

Related Stories

Stable Release of VLC 1.0 for Android 17 comments

Tom's Hardware reports

[VideoLAN Client] tends to have better codec and format support than most players out there, offering MKV, MP4, AVI, Ogg, MOV, FLAC, TS, M2TS, and AAC. It's also open source and free.

[February 5], we got the news that VLC 1.0 has finally been released as stable, losing the beta tag. VLC will continue to keep a beta branch for the braver users who want to get all the latest updates first and help the group behind the open source organization, VideoLAN, to discover and fix the bugs in the new versions.

[...]From the changelog in the Play Store is the following statement:
"This release fixes ARMv8 processors, Android 5.0 crashes, and minor improvements. The 0.9.x series is major release with hardware decoding and a new interface available in dark or white colors. It integrates DVD iso and menu support, an equalizer, playlist management, Widi [sic] screens support, and updated SD cards detection. Hardware acceleration is now enabled by default on 4.3+ and has better subtitles support. Software decoding has been accelerated too."

VLC 1.0 for Android can be downloaded[1] from the Play Store now.

[1] A blank page now. Google Search is no help.

VLC 2.0 for Android Released 42 comments

Martin Brinkmann reports from gHacks:

VLC 2.0 is available for all Android versions 2.2 and newer, and [is] already available on Google Play and various third-party stores.

Major new features

  • Video Playlists
  • Download subtitles
  • Network Browsing
  • Pop-out window
  • Other features of note
    • Supports favorite folders and URLS
    • The history, notifications, and control have been rewritten
    • Faster decoding and playback for all video types

Original Submission

EU Offers Cash Bounties to Improve the Security of VLC Media Player 19 comments

The EU is offering cash bounties to improve the security of the VLC media player. The VLC bounties are a proof-of-concept test to learn how to run future bounties via Free and Open Source Software Audit 2 (FOSSA-2). In this trial run, bounties which range from $100 for low-severity bugs and up to $2,000 for critical bugs are offered via HackerOne.

According to Wikipedia: "VLC media player (commonly known as VLC) is a free and open-source, portable and cross-platform media player and streaming media server developed by the VideoLAN project. VLC is available for desktop operating systems and mobile platforms, such as Windows 10 Mobile, Windows Phone, Android, Tizen, iOS."

Much more information, as well as downloads, are available on the VLC homepage.


Original Submission

Google Won't Take Down Pirate VLC With 5M Downloads (Update: They Have Taken it Down) 28 comments

From TorrentFreak:

VideoLAN, the team behind the VLC media player, recently revealed that they turned down several tens of millions of euros to bundle their software with advertising. The same cannot be said of third-party developers cloning VLC for profit, however. An ad-supported clone discovered on Google Play has a staggering five to ten million downloads and breaches VLC's GPL license, yet Google refuses to take it down.

[...] Aside from its incredible functionality, VLC (operated by the VideoLAN non-profit) has won the hearts of Internet users for other key reasons, not least its commitment to being free and open source software. While it's true to say that VLC doesn't cost a penny, the term 'free' actually relates to the General Public License (GPL) under which it's distributed.

[...] Since VLC is extremely popular and just about as 'free' as software can get, people get extremely defensive when they perceive that a third-party is benefiting from the software without adhering to the terms of the generous GPL license. That was the case beginning a few hours ago when veteran Reddit user MartinVanBallin pointed out a piece of software on the Google Play Store.

"They took VLC, put in ads, didn't attribute VLC or follow the open source license, and they're using Media Player Classics icon," MartinVanBallin wrote.

Update: The app is no longer on Google Play.


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @11:26AM (4 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @11:26AM (#636329)

    The real question is: does it convert %20's and %5D's and other crap in the URI field of the playlist to something actually useful? Or include a readable "filename" field?

    Last time I checked, it was impossible to get human-readable filenames in the playlist window, and the feature request for it was either denied or ignored, I don't remember which. I tried to dig through the source code to see if I could implement it myself, but to no avail :/ It seemed that I'd need to get familiar with a large portion of the codebase to do it, and that'd require a sizable time commitment...

    • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @05:55PM (3 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @05:55PM (#636395)

      maybe if stupid freaking windows users would quit putting spaces in everything... of course you'd probably hear gabriel's trumpet if that happened.

      • (Score: 3, Insightful) by arslan on Monday February 12 2018, @12:39AM (1 child)

        by arslan (3462) on Monday February 12 2018, @12:39AM (#636513)

        I dunno, the computer should cater to my preferences, not the other way around. Most users prefer to have space breaks between words (for English at least, not sure about other languages)... no wonder "The year of the linux desktop" never got anywhere

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 12 2018, @03:00AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 12 2018, @03:00AM (#636549)

        I count a single space in the name of this file I just loaded in VLC: %E7%AC%AC01%E8%A9%B1%20%E3%80%8C%E5%A7%8B%E3%81%BE%E3%82%8A%E3%81%A8%E7%B5%82%E3%82%8F%E3%82%8A%E3%81%AE%E3%83%97%E3%83%AD%E3%83%AD%E3%83%BC%E3%82%B0%E3%80%8D.mp4

        "Stupid freaking Windows users"? Get off of your high horse, you moron. An occasional %20 instead of a space is not *that* much of a problem, but as soon as you have non-English filenames, it's all line-noise. Unicode is 30 years old, FFS! Even browser address bars convert codes into readable characters!

  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by TheRaven on Sunday February 11 2018, @12:05PM (5 children)

    by TheRaven (270) on Sunday February 11 2018, @12:05PM (#636334) Journal

    One of the features that VLC has always lacked is the ability to auto-enable subtitles for foreign-language segments on DVDs. For example, if you watch the Game of Thrones DVDs on a normal DVD player, you'll get subtitles when people start speaking Dothraki or whatever. In VLC, you won't and you'll wonder why the folks at HBO thought everyone in their audience was fluent in a made-up language. VLC's bug tracker is sufficiently painful to use that I gave up trying to follow the status of this feature.

    Maybe I'm the only person who still watches DVDs, but they're currently the only way of getting most things without DRM (DVD DRM is so completely broken that it's effectively nonexistent).

    --
    sudo mod me up
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @03:47PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @03:47PM (#636365)

      You are not the only one who still watches them. I have thousands of them. In fact I have so many I rarely use streaming.

    • (Score: 3, Touché) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @05:58PM (3 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @05:58PM (#636397)

      there's a file sharing website called thepiratebay.org, if you ever decide to quit groveling to your masters. nothing personal. just saying.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 12 2018, @01:05AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 12 2018, @01:05AM (#636521)

        Don't forget the 7 proxies. [google.com]

        -- OriginalOwner_ [soylentnews.org]

      • (Score: 2) by dry on Monday February 12 2018, @03:30AM (1 child)

        by dry (223) on Monday February 12 2018, @03:30AM (#636559)

        Usage caps. Limited bandwidth. Can get a lot of movies by making a trip to the library. Used DVD's are also cheap at the thrift store.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 12 2018, @04:15AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 12 2018, @04:15AM (#636568)

          Is it still a thing where people visit friends? [google.com]
          Do you take with you a hard drive full of media so that your friends can make a copy?
          Do you have an empty partition on that where you can copy his new media files?

          -- OriginalOwner_ [soylentnews.org]

  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by ledow on Sunday February 11 2018, @12:43PM (2 children)

    by ledow (5567) on Sunday February 11 2018, @12:43PM (#636339) Homepage

    I tried the Chromecast thing. I've been waiting for it for ages and I tried it earlier in the week when the announcement first came out.

    Result:

    - Could not find option with looking it up. Hint... Playback... Renderer... hope your Chromecast name just appears in a mDNS search of the local network (so presumably, it's doing an mDNS every time you go in that menu, or constantly in the background all the time?)
    - Casts an MP3. It spun for a while. Came up with the most boring interface. Played it okay. Tried to skip... it just spun and never came back.
    - The Chromecast then wouldn't switch or cast anything else, so I switched it off and back on.
    - Tried an MP4... it showed the most boring interface again on the Chromecast screen... got the filename... literally never did anything else.

    I gave up at that point. I'm not having that shit happen in the middle of watching a movie!

    Hey, guys, there's a Chromecast SDK. You could just use a closed DLL to do the same properly and it might work enough for people to use it, which might prompt an open-source conversion at a later date. Isn't that what had to happen with DVD, Blu-Ray, etc. anyway?

    At the moment, it's just a way to stop the Chromecast working, requiring a reset or a long timeout to get it back.

    • (Score: 2) by cubancigar11 on Sunday February 11 2018, @01:58PM

      by cubancigar11 (330) Subscriber Badge on Sunday February 11 2018, @01:58PM (#636348) Homepage Journal

      Chromecast is shit. I know it is not the same, but amazon fire stick actually is very useful..

    • (Score: 2) by arslan on Monday February 12 2018, @12:43AM

      by arslan (3462) on Monday February 12 2018, @12:43AM (#636516)

      Huh? I just use the Home app on my android to cast/mirror screen and launch VLC on my android device. I don't see a big deal with that, once VLC starts playing on my android device, the screen shortcuts seems to work fine. Sure its not an app native cast but its works and not a big hassle.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @12:53PM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @12:53PM (#636340)

    VLC is that player that will keep hammering the gpu despite the video being paused and minimized by rendering a still frame I think.

    • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @03:15PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @03:15PM (#636360)

      Sounds like it might be mining some crypto.

  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by looorg on Sunday February 11 2018, @01:19PM (4 children)

    by looorg (578) on Sunday February 11 2018, @01:19PM (#636344)

    Kinda odd, when I use the in-application feature to check for updates it says there are none and that I'm using the latest one. Yet it's not 3.0.0 but rather 2.2.6. Guess it will require some kind of stand-alone-update.

    • (Score: 2) by cubancigar11 on Sunday February 11 2018, @02:00PM (1 child)

      by cubancigar11 (330) Subscriber Badge on Sunday February 11 2018, @02:00PM (#636349) Homepage Journal

      I think updater only works on minor versions. I may be wrong but I had the same issue when they went 2.0.0

      • (Score: 2) by looorg on Sunday February 11 2018, @02:08PM

        by looorg (578) on Sunday February 11 2018, @02:08PM (#636351)

        That sounds familiar, I think I had that issue before to. So it might very well be the case. But it just feels like a missed opportunity on their part not to have it included or to say something like "there is a new major update available that requires a manual installation".

    • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @06:01PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @06:01PM (#636399)

      get a big boy's OS and use it's package manager to update every package on the whole system, instead of manually updating each app like you have nothing better to do.

      • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @08:17PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @08:17PM (#636426)

        Does that 'big boy' OS include systemd? Maybe someday the package manager will get around to updating to the latest version. I have a few dozen packages I have to 'keep on top of' because the main repos have not upgraded in 2 years for those particular packages.

  • (Score: 2) by opinionated_science on Sunday February 11 2018, @02:53PM

    by opinionated_science (4031) on Sunday February 11 2018, @02:53PM (#636356)

    snap install --classic vlc

    this will allow it to use the /dev/dvb/* devices, the one *really* useful feature when you have no TV and just a USB decoder.

    You may have to "snap remove vlc" first, but I was nicely surprised this worked out of the box.

  • (Score: 2) by takyon on Sunday February 11 2018, @03:03PM (2 children)

    by takyon (881) Subscriber Badge <{takyon} {at} {soylentnews.org}> on Sunday February 11 2018, @03:03PM (#636359) Journal

    My issues with 3.0.0 were subtitles mysteriously turning off (near the beginning of a video, not the whole time), and the end of video chapters cutting off some milliseconds (noticeable because the audio transition is too abrupt). There was a crash or two on opening some files but it wasn't reproducible.

    Let's hope 3.0.1 lands fast.

    --
    [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @03:35PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @03:35PM (#636362)

      oh?
      vlc can be a media-server from which a google-chromecast-dongle can be directed to pull/stream media from?

      how about for vlc to be a virtual display, playing and decoding media that can be mirrored to/by a miracast enabled receiver
      (plugged into a TV's HDMI or present in it already)?

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @03:51PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @03:51PM (#636367)

    I am liking the new bluray menu support (looking at you john wick with your 200+ chapter options, you sly folks). Which means KODI should have a decent implementation soon.

    Just make sure you set JAVA_HOME correctly. I had to set mine as the JDK installer does not set it on my box for some reason.

  • (Score: 2) by martyb on Sunday February 11 2018, @04:34PM (2 children)

    by martyb (76) Subscriber Badge on Sunday February 11 2018, @04:34PM (#636372) Journal

    If this has been added some time along the way, I'd appreciate pointers in how to access/use it.

    It seems that using VLC to transform a source to another 'construct' requires knowledge of codecs, containers, etc.

    As it now stands, it seems like I have to do a whole lot of trial-and-error. Select source. Select destination file. Choose transformation parameters. Transform. Test on local system. Copy to another system (e.g. mobile phone). Test on mobile. Does not play. Ugh. Repeat.

    What I would love to see is a way to point at an existing file and say "whatever settings it takes to make that kind of a file -- get and use those for my output." Then, I could just point at, say, a CD as my source, specify a pathname for the destination, and hit "Go".

    So, as long as I have at least one file that works on my system, I could use that as a prototype to make other files of the same format. Say, that instead of creating an .mp3/.mp4 I wanted to make an ogg vorbis file? Or a FLAC? As long as I can find at least one file that works on my target system(s), I should only need to refer to that file and I would be all set.

    Bonus: Maybe offer an interim step where I can could tweak the derived/loaded settings and (optionally) export those for later re-use/re-import.

    Is this already supported? If not, is there a simple[ish] way to do this?

    --
    Wit is intellect, dancing.
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by bzipitidoo on Sunday February 11 2018, @07:04PM

      by bzipitidoo (4388) on Sunday February 11 2018, @07:04PM (#636411) Journal

      I suppose ffmpeg is the opposite of the simplicity you're looking for? And yet, I find ffprobe pretty useful for getting the details of a video file. And once I understood the parameters ffmpeg needed, and made a script, it wasn't so bad. Bit of a learning curve, yes, and there are some gotchas. Like, there's a bug in which ffmpeg's default audio settings fail to properly transcode if the source is 5.1 surround sound.

      Which kind of mobile phone? I understand Google has made quite a push to make WebM (a container format) containing either VP8 or VP9 video, with either Vorbis or Opus audio, work natively on Android systems. Need Android 5 for Opus, and Android 4.4 for VP9. I did find that a recent version of VLC (2.5, I think) sort of supports playback of WebM with VP9 video and Opus audio in my ancient tablet running Android 4.1, but the tablet's hardware wasn't fast enough-- showed only one frame from the video while it played the audio. Really have to use something supported by the tablet's hardware, which means (sigh) H.264. Maybe VP8 would work, but I haven't tried it. Also, WebM works in browsers.

      This is the script I'm using ATM, for transcoding mpeg2 ripped from DVDs, to WebM. (Using MakeMKV to rip the DVDs-- copy protection DRM crap, you know, otherwise ffmpeg could rip them.) Need a bit more script fu, like, a variable to hold the bit rates, and to grab that info from the command line, so I don't have to edit 2 places in the script when I want a different bit rate. The aformat parameter is to deal with the bug with 5.1 audio I mentioned above, -map 0 is to grab all the streams including the subtitles, then -sn is to skip the subtitles.

      ffmpeg -i $1 -map 0 -c:v libvpx-vp9 -b:v 300k -c:a libopus -b:a 48k -sn -af aformat=channel_layouts="7.1|5.1|stereo" -pass 1 -f webm -y /dev/null && ffmpeg -i $1 -map 0 -c:v libvpx-vp9 -b:v 300k -c:a libopus -b:a 48k -sn -af aformat=channel_layouts="7.1|5.1|stereo" -pass 2 ${1%.*}.webm

      The above 300k is still too low a bitrate to handle very dark scenes, though it does well on everything else I've seen. I find that a bit puzzling in that DVD is only 480 lines, while a 360k bitrate is good enough to handle 1280x720 video, but I suppose the additional data in going from 480 to 720 lines isn't that much. Perhaps I'm wasting my time with a DVD source and ought to work with a Blu-Ray source instead. Which means, if it's a popular movie, the easiest thing to do is just download a freaking torrent.

      I haven't worked out how to get the subtitles, but WebM can handle them, with WebVTT, a text based format. A problem is, I gather that DVD subtitles are graphical in nature, already rendered into whatever font at whatever size the movie producer decided to use, so, have to OCR them. Or, I understand that there are websites that specialize in movie subtitles. Could download the text.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @07:13PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @07:13PM (#636414)

      So transcoding? There are plenty of dedicated solutions for that, some come with such tunable presets.

  • (Score: 2) by LoRdTAW on Sunday February 11 2018, @06:39PM (6 children)

    by LoRdTAW (3755) Subscriber Badge on Sunday February 11 2018, @06:39PM (#636409) Journal

    This thing sounds more like a fucking OS than a media player. Should change the logo to a stopped-up kitchen sink overflowing with shit. Why does the media player need networking client code built in? Why does it need to be a chromecast server? Java vm internal for blu-ray menus? Can I just have an application again? Same with web browsers, whole OS just to do something mundane.

    This is what you get when people say the OS no longer matters. Applications become their own operating systems with millions of lines of code to navigate a neglected maze of cruft. That cruft is simply the result of stagnated OS design which was left behind in the name of progress for building abstracted virtual machines on top of the cruft aka web and cloud. It has as stranded us with 30+ year old OS design philosophies and creating mountains of unnecessary code to work around issues which should have (and were: plan9) been fixed decades ago.

    • (Score: 2, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @08:14PM (5 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @08:14PM (#636425)

      Network support is one of the things that has been in VLC since the early stages of that project. The idea was beefy server that can transcode -> low end box with frame buffer. Think nice high end box circa 2001 and a crap laptop from that era.

      These days yeah it is not needed as much. But there was a point in time where decoding mpeg2 in realtime was a strain for many boxes out there. Plex vs KODI is the same sort of thing. Where Plex has a network-centric model where the 'big box transcodes' and the end nodes (usually rasberry PIs) are simple framebuffer players. KODI which Plex is based on is on the other hand the client is full blown client on all boxes.

      Java is needed as the bluray spec calls for it. Don't want it? Do not install java and the player will fall back to the old path and just show the first largest video in the topic list (does not work always). This is also BTW one of the first open source projects with menu support for bluray. That has been under construction for 4 years. Sony did not exactly make it easy.

      creating mountains of unnecessary code to work around issues which should have (and were: plan9) been fixed decades ago
      If you read the announcement for 4.0 they are throwing out older OSs lower than and including Vista. The 3.x branch has been under construction for at least 3 years. All by volunteers in their spare time. So I think I can cut them a bit of slack on the time frame. It is not exactly their full time jobs...

      • (Score: 2) by LoRdTAW on Sunday February 11 2018, @10:18PM (4 children)

        by LoRdTAW (3755) Subscriber Badge on Sunday February 11 2018, @10:18PM (#636462) Journal

        No, my point is the team is forced to build a bloated application to work around the cruft. That is what I have a problem with.

        And as for bloat in the application itself, it tries to really be a kitchen sink. Don't get me wrong, it's a great program and I use it as my media player of choice. But it has a lot of excess features thrown in that I wish were separate like blue ray support and streaming servers. Just give me a compact, stable, sleek player that can handle any codec and source with good hardware acceleration.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @11:31PM (1 child)

          by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 11 2018, @11:31PM (#636487)

          Can't you just compile it yourself and not enable those features you don't want? Or just use mpv or go even more minimal and use ffplay directly.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 12 2018, @12:39AM

            by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 12 2018, @12:39AM (#636514)

            This will be the year of the Gentoo desktop!

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 12 2018, @03:10AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 12 2018, @03:10AM (#636552)

          But it has a lot of excess features thrown in that I wish were separate like blue ray support and streaming servers. Just give me a compact, stable, sleek player that can handle any codec and source with good hardware acceleration.

          Unfortunately, that's the age-old problem of "one person's cruft is another's core feature". At least it doesn't read email [catb.org] yet... I think.

        • (Score: 3, Insightful) by urza9814 on Monday February 12 2018, @07:28PM

          by urza9814 (3954) on Monday February 12 2018, @07:28PM (#636792) Journal

          And as for bloat in the application itself, it tries to really be a kitchen sink. Don't get me wrong, it's a great program and I use it as my media player of choice. But it has a lot of excess features thrown in that I wish were separate like blue ray support and streaming servers. Just give me a compact, stable, sleek player that can handle any codec and source with good hardware acceleration.

          How is it bloated? Because it's not yet another mplayer clone? Sure likes like mplayer is what you actually want here.

          VLC isn't just a player, it's a goddamn video swiss army knife. Where many (particularly Windows) users would have one program to do conversion, a different program for playing optical media, a different program for viewing network streams, a different program for local capture devices, a different program for sending network streams, a different program for ripping...I just go "Oh, I need to do something for video...I'll use VLC." Instead of installing and keeping track of twenty different bloated pieces of garbage, I get to install a single compact utility that just freakin' works. If you only ever use one feature, then sure, it's "bloated" for that feature. But that's because it's NOT just a media player.

          The value of VLC is not that it plays video. The value of VLC is that it can accomplish pretty much any one-off video tasks you might have. Girlfriend asks how to rip a DVD? VLC. Need to stream your desktop to someone over the network using entirely your own infrastructure? You only need one piece of software -- VLC. Guy at work asks for help transcoding a video? Give him VLC. Don't have any software to capture stills from your webcam? Sure you do -- VLC. People ask me for help with their computers all the time, and if that question includes the word "video" my answer is probably going to be VLC. I don't have to Duck it, I don't have to learn a dozen or more tools for four or five different platforms, just three letters answers all of it: VLC.

  • (Score: 2) by shortscreen on Sunday February 11 2018, @09:11PM (1 child)

    by shortscreen (2252) on Sunday February 11 2018, @09:11PM (#636446) Journal

    hurray!

  • (Score: 1) by zzarko on Tuesday February 13 2018, @12:04AM

    by zzarko (5697) on Tuesday February 13 2018, @12:04AM (#636890)

    In previous versions, I have tried numerous times to instruct VLC to display subtitles in black space below the video, but it was always complicated and unintuitive, and that was the main reason I didn't use it as main video player. Can someone confirm if this is solved or not in 3.0?

(1)