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posted by mrpg on Tuesday March 13 2018, @03:51AM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the at-least-we-don't-use-kanjis dept.

Submitted via IRC for Bytram

The language doesn't take a vacation, and neither does the dictionary. The words we use are constantly changing in big ways and small, and we're here to record those changes. Each word has taken its own path in its own time to become part of our language—to be used frequently enough by some in order to be placed in a reference for all. If you're likely to encounter a word in the wild, whether in the news, a restaurant menu, a tech update, or a Twitter meme, that word belongs in the dictionary.

[...] In recent years, the richest source of these newly adopted foreign-language words has been the world of food-or, perhaps we should say: the food of the world.

[...] The sometimes perplexing domain of digital financial exchanges opens a window into a subject that requires explanation for many of us, hence the detailed definition of cryptocurrency

[...] Health care, both physical and psychological, gives us many new words as well. Neoadjuvant refers to treatment for a disease or condition that is administered before the primary treatment in order to improve the likelihood of a successful outcome

Source: The Dictionary Just Got a Whole Lot Bigger (archive, because "adblocker" is not their favorite word)


Original Submission

Related Stories

Indian State of Odisha Releases 21 Dictionaries Under CC BY 4.0 9 comments

Global Voices has an interview with Ranjana Chopra, head of a special department in the state government of Odisha, India. The state of Odisha, India, has published dictionaries in the state's 21 indigenous languages under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License [CC BY]. These are tri-lingual dictionaries which translate to and from the selected indigenous language and English and the local official langage, Odia. Some of the languages are spoken by as few as 8,000 people in the state.

In 2018, the government of the Indian state of Odisha published 21 dictionaries in the state's 21 provincial indigenous languages. The dictionaries were developed in collaboration with native-speaking communities for planned implementation in multilingual primary education programs. The trilingual dictionaries, with indigenous language translations into English and Odia (the official language of Odisha), have been uploaded in August 2019 for public use in an online education portal managed by the government.

On October 17, all the dictionaries were relicensed by online education portal Odisha Virtual Academy under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Earlier on SN:
850 New Words in the Merriam-Webster Dictionary (2018)


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by cocaine overdose on Tuesday March 13 2018, @04:12AM (12 children)

    There are two main poles in the "how should we maintain the English language" camp: Descriptivists that see language as a fluid organism, whose standards need to be updated frequently as the English-speaking populations start using it new ways (e.g "literally" meaning figuratively, or "twerk") and Prescriptivists that believe there is one proper way to write and speak English, and any deviation is wrong. The former camp is the undisputed champion, favored among the more progressive and socially-invested, while the latter is popular among curmudgeons, but is like Strict Mode JS (prescriptivists) is to modern abuses of JavaScript (descriptivists). Merriam-webster is not an authority on anything, except language analysis for determining which words and grammars have become en vogue. Unfortunately, there seems to be a bias on the vernacular of yuppies and the like (kombucha, mansplain, unicorn, welp, etc).
    • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Tuesday March 13 2018, @04:31AM (4 children)

      by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 13 2018, @04:31AM (#651680) Journal

      Descriptivists that see language as a fluid organism... and Prescriptivists that believe there is one proper way to write and speak English, and any deviation is wrong

      No matter what you do, English will always evolve into something that is wrong... terrible illogical, unnecessary complicated and wrong.

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @04:43AM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @04:43AM (#651683)

        Wrong is Right and Winning is Tiresome.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @05:42AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @05:42AM (#651695)

          Wrong is Right and Winning is Tiresome.

          You forgot "and Alt-right is wrong".

      • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday March 13 2018, @07:52PM (1 child)

        by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 13 2018, @07:52PM (#651960) Journal

        Shirley, you don't suppose the English language must have evolved from something prior?

        If it sprang into persistence over knight, then why wasn't it patented?

        --
        Biden must DO SOMETHING to stop bloggers using the wrong color schemes!
        • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Tuesday March 13 2018, @10:43PM

          by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 13 2018, @10:43PM (#652032) Journal

          So happened with many other languages, who adopted a sane spelling (and a smaller number of irregular verbs)

          --
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
    • (Score: 3, Funny) by takyon on Tuesday March 13 2018, @04:32AM

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Tuesday March 13 2018, @04:32AM (#651681) Journal

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kombucha [wikipedia.org]

      The exact origins of kombucha are not known, although Manchuria is commonly cited as a likely place of origin.[8] It may have originated as recently as 200 years ago or as long as 2000 years ago.[31] The drink is reported to have been consumed in east Russia at least as early as 1900, and from there entered Europe.[26] In 1913, kombucha was first mentioned in German literature.[32] Its consumption increased in the United States during the early 21st century.[31][33] Having an alcohol content of about 0.5%, kombucha is a federally regulated beverage in the United States, a factor that affected its commercial development in 2015.

      And now you can buy it at your local grocery store. Might as well throw it in the dictionary.

      Given that I had to throw in the archive link as this story went live, I'd say Merriam-Webster is an authority on clickbaiting [merriam-webster.com] (added in 2015 [cnn.com]) to generate AdSense dollars using listicles [merriam-webster.com] (2017 [merriam-webster.com]).

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
    • (Score: 5, Informative) by acid andy on Tuesday March 13 2018, @05:37AM (5 children)

      by acid andy (1683) on Tuesday March 13 2018, @05:37AM (#651692) Homepage Journal

      e.g "literally" meaning figuratively

      No! Just no! If we ever give in to the above, how are we to convey the traditional meaning of the word? "Truly", "actually" and "genuinely" don't come close enough. Besides, it would take away the endless opportunities for mirth at fools proclaiming that they were "literally pissing themselves laughing" or "literally exploding with anger".

      --
      Where did that thought come from? And that one? What about this one? Woah, man...
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @05:42AM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @05:42AM (#651696)

        how are we to convey the traditional meaning of the word?

        "Totally." [youtube.com]

        • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday March 13 2018, @07:49PM

          by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 13 2018, @07:49PM (#651957) Journal

          You mean . . . Like Totally.

          --
          Biden must DO SOMETHING to stop bloggers using the wrong color schemes!
      • (Score: 2, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @12:53PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @12:53PM (#651792)

        From my experience? "Literally literally".

        • (Score: 2) by acid andy on Tuesday March 13 2018, @05:56PM

          by acid andy (1683) on Tuesday March 13 2018, @05:56PM (#651902) Homepage Journal

          Interesting. I suppose "figuratively figuratively" might also serve a similar purpose. No, your Honor, I was not being literally figurative. I was being figuratively figurative. Which is to say, what I said was not figurative. It was literal. It was literally literal.

          --
          Where did that thought come from? And that one? What about this one? Woah, man...
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @04:40PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @04:40PM (#651873)
  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @05:02AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @05:02AM (#651686)

    "embiggen" - Request to bash the speaker upside the head with a large club.
    "mansplain" - Notification that the speaker is a douche bag and you should disregard everything they say.
    "life hack" - Warning label applied to procedures that are likely hazardous to your health and probably damaging to the objects involved.
    "self-care" - Standard form of health insurance found in shit hole countries such as the United States of America.
    "initial coin offering" - A nearly foolproof plan to rapidly separate many morons from their money.

    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday March 13 2018, @07:42PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 13 2018, @07:42PM (#651950) Journal

      "fascinate" - To attach something to something else.
      "fixated" - The state something is in once repairs have been completed.
      "whistleblower" - Someone who leaked information prior to 2001.
      "terrorist" - Someone who leaked information after 2001.
      "too fah" - Rhode Islanders' description of anything more than 15 minutes away.
      "covfefe" - ???

      (A sign fascinated to the wall said to bring your borked Windows PC here to be fixated.)

      Teach kids that if it's not in Urban Dictionary, it's not a real word. Wikipedia article, or it's not true.

      --
      Biden must DO SOMETHING to stop bloggers using the wrong color schemes!
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @11:27AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @11:27AM (#651769)

    (archive, because "adblocker" is not their favorite word)

    Well, I can see the page quite fine, despite the adblocker.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @11:37AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 13 2018, @11:37AM (#651771)

    FTFA:

    a demonym names a person who comes from a specific place

    I would have guessed it to be the name of a demon. ;-)

  • (Score: 2) by All Your Lawn Are Belong To Us on Tuesday March 13 2018, @04:41PM

    by All Your Lawn Are Belong To Us (6553) on Tuesday March 13 2018, @04:41PM (#651874) Journal

    "hmm, ooh, mm-hmm, and, welp" O RLY? Why not O RLY?
    "Bandwidth" for emotional or mental capacity
    "glamping" = glamor + camping
    And "wordie".

    It's enough to make me a prescriptivist. Or think that Merriam-Webster is trying to compete with The Free Dictionary or Wiktionary instead of the OED (which also amends itself, but show me the wordie!)

    --
    Keep everyone ignorant of the magical world! KEEP AMERICA OBLIVIATE!
  • (Score: 2) by SomeGuy on Tuesday March 13 2018, @06:49PM (1 child)

    by SomeGuy (5632) on Tuesday March 13 2018, @06:49PM (#651930)

    Let me know when the word "you" is officially replaced by "u".

    Because then I need to shoot myself.

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by DannyB on Tuesday March 13 2018, @07:47PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 13 2018, @07:47PM (#651955) Journal

      Wait until punctuation and capitalization are back in style again. If the millennials' have any children, they will be excited about this novel new thing.

      --
      Biden must DO SOMETHING to stop bloggers using the wrong color schemes!
  • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday March 13 2018, @08:08PM (2 children)

    by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 13 2018, @08:08PM (#651969) Journal

    What about using the wrong word? It's commonly done.

    Oh, that sucks.

    No. No, it doesn't. It bites. Not sucks. Sucks would be a good thing.

    I'll be right back, got to go take a dump.

    No. You're going to leave one, not take one.

    Same for I've got to leave a piss.

    --
    Biden must DO SOMETHING to stop bloggers using the wrong color schemes!
    • (Score: 2) by Azuma Hazuki on Tuesday March 13 2018, @09:35PM (1 child)

      by Azuma Hazuki (5086) on Tuesday March 13 2018, @09:35PM (#652016) Journal

      Said every standup comedian ever since 1963, LOL. I always wondered about those myself honestly, but usage is usage.

      --
      I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
      • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Wednesday March 14 2018, @01:47PM

        by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday March 14 2018, @01:47PM (#652364) Journal

        I am not aware of any standup comedian said that. But I am not surprised.

        The "take" vs "leave" is one I came up with in 1980 in college.

        The "bites" is one I came up with in about 2000.

        But I am not at all shocked or surprised if others have independently made the same observations.

        --
        Biden must DO SOMETHING to stop bloggers using the wrong color schemes!
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