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posted by martyb on Sunday September 30 2018, @07:27AM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the the-nightly-images-are-good-too dept.

After nearly 6 years since R1/alpha4, Haiku R1/beta1 has been released.

[...] This release sees the addition of official x86_64 images, alongside the existing x86 32-bit ones.

[...] By far the largest change in this release is the addition of a complete package management system.

I'm very happy to see the progress alternative open source operating systems have made in recent years.

[Haiku -- an OS,
development continues,
open source is good.
Try your own --Ed.]


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  • (Score: 3, Informative) by beckett on Sunday September 30 2018, @08:23AM (3 children)

    by beckett (1115) on Sunday September 30 2018, @08:23AM (#742029)

    A milestone release

    At least Libreoffice works

    Only XGA

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 30 2018, @02:19PM (2 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 30 2018, @02:19PM (#742082)

      Little has changed
      In a decade sine I last
      Booted a VM

      • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @01:30AM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @01:30AM (#742199)

        becoming stable
        not yet but much better now
        we're quite nearly there

        Really, Haiku would have been production ready ten years ago if it'd go for a day without crashing.
        Many of the core features have largely been done for the last decade, but you really couldn't trust your data to it.
        You still can't quite, but it's been improving steadily for the last few years.
        The biggest things for most people with this release are:
        >actual wifi support
        >proper package management
        >driver support is better

        • (Score: 1) by shrewdsheep on Monday October 01 2018, @11:16AM

          by shrewdsheep (5215) Subscriber Badge on Monday October 01 2018, @11:16AM (#742281)

          Have they learned to test their software? For you shan't exist if you don't test.

  • (Score: 3, Informative) by MichaelDavidCrawford on Sunday September 30 2018, @06:14PM (1 child)

    by MichaelDavidCrawford (2339) Subscriber Badge <mdcrawford@gmail.com> on Sunday September 30 2018, @06:14PM (#742133) Homepage Journal

    It was in alpha for like five or six years.

    A lot of the delay is adding new drivers, but there's also lots of stuff like experimenting with UI concepts.

    A while back I contemplated choosing a nightly based on its stability then selling laptops with Haiku preinstalled. The developers encouraged me to do so provided I not call it "Haiku". I'd have to call it Mike-Ooh or some such.

    --
    Yes I Have No Bananas. [gofundme.com]
    • (Score: 3, Funny) by urza9814 on Monday October 01 2018, @06:26PM

      by urza9814 (3954) on Monday October 01 2018, @06:26PM (#742403) Journal

      The developers encouraged me to do so provided I not call it "Haiku". I'd have to call it Mike-Ooh or some such.

      ...would that be pronounced as "My Coup"? :)

  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by jmorris on Sunday September 30 2018, @06:39PM (6 children)

    by jmorris (4844) on Sunday September 30 2018, @06:39PM (#742136)

    With the future of Linux now uncertain, it is more important than ever to encourage these other efforts. The few times I have tried it over the years have been interesting experiences. It "works" pretty darned good, it is fast, etc. But what they don't have is support for any real hardware that I have seen. There is no machine they can point to and say "It works on this." So it is for now condemned to live in VMs. The key benefits it brings to the table do not shine well in a VM. Low resource consumption and multimedia are where it seems to excel and that needs bare metal installation.

    If they have LibreOffice actually sorted out (last announcement was more like "It launches") then I'd say that gets them 1/2 of the way to viability. The first of four milestones was self hosted development, LibreOffice would get them the next. Still remaining would be a full html5 standards compliant (about as close as any of the other ones at least) browser and the final goal would be ONE currently produced desktop PC with full hardware support, including OpenGL, accelerated video playback, all onboard hardware and enough USB devices they could make a claim that one could actually do more with the system that briefly demonstrate the OS. I.e. cross that border from promise to usable as a day to day OS.

    For me Linux crossed that line in 1995, when Win95 was a hot mess that couldn't even support my tape drive and booting across to Linux everything "just worked" so that was where I stayed, keeping dual boot only for the occasional task that couldn't be done yet on Linux. Those exceptions diminished on a regular basis to the point I had stopped bothering installing a Windows partition by the 21st Century other than on leaving the one on laptops that you must pay for anyway as a way to update the BIOS, etc. At home the last Microsoft OS on my desktop was a time limited beta of Win XP 64-bit.

    Now it is certain that the clock has started ticking on when a migration will be forced. FreeBSD is already infected, OpenBSD runs poorly on desktops and so far not at all on Laptops I have tried. Almost got it running on an old Thinkpad but couldn't get power management to either suspend or hibernate and for a laptop that is fatal. Will be watching Haiku very closely. Seeing success reports now but to date those have always been fanboys who think VESA graphics is "supported video." Anyone here able to report success?

    • (Score: 2) by PartTimeZombie on Sunday September 30 2018, @09:19PM

      by PartTimeZombie (4827) Subscriber Badge on Sunday September 30 2018, @09:19PM (#742159)

      As a formerly very happy Be-OS user, I have been interested in Haiku for a while.

      I have not had a lot of success installing it on anything until recently, and am about to try this beta without a lot of confidence.

      Until someone with very deep pockets gives this team the resources to put more effort into Haiku I can't see it being more than an Internet oddity.

      I would be very pleased if I was proved wrong however.

    • (Score: 2) by bzipitidoo on Sunday September 30 2018, @10:57PM

      by bzipitidoo (4388) on Sunday September 30 2018, @10:57PM (#742172) Journal

      is this the Year of the Alternative and Ancient OSes?

      I had never heard of TempleOS until the recent news of its creator's passing.
      Then this Haiku, an open source BeOS clone, reaches beta status.
      There's also news a few days ago that M$ has released source for MS-DOS 1 and 2. (FreeDOS released version 1.2 in Dec 2016.)
      And this all happens as Linus takes an absence from Linux.

      So, Minix 3? Anything new? Still stuck on version 3.3.0, I see. Didn't do a Google Summer of Code this year so you could wow us in September with microkernel goodness running Firefox for Minix 3.

    • (Score: 2, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @12:25AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @12:25AM (#742184)

      Anyone here able to report success?

      As I had a spare disk kicking around,
      Toshiba Sattelite C660-195
      Dual booting with Devuan
      Network and Wireless work out of the box,
      sound works out of the box
      Screen runs at 1366x768 32bpp
      GL Teapot runs at 58 fps

      Things I didn't expect to work: the fn keys for volume, brightness etc (even under Linux, where they're sort-of supported, they're a bit hit and miss anyway)
      Video playback is ok, had several different files open and running simultaneously, the only visible problems were nothing to do with Haiku OS, but everything to do with the crappy encoding of some of them (same issues playing them on the Linux boxes), only thing of note is that the audio/video sync is more than a wee bit more off for a number of files tested.

      As to laptop support, I don't see any menu entries for suspend to disk, it's been a while since I've played with Haiku, long, long time since I touched BeOS, I'll be RTFM'ing on and off over the next couple of days..unfortunately I'll have to put 'the other disk' back into the laptop, as I'm currently in the land of the redundant and unemployed I need the thing to boot Win7 for Corel and Artcam to get my design portfolio up to date, so playing time will be restricted to odd hours.

      some bad photos of it up and running..

      https://yadi.sk/i/rWdffNGjxeSjVQ [yadi.sk] (Ignore the laptop running Kali....it wasn't up to anything, honest!)
      https://yadi.sk/i/xoLIMPhx-0hmmg [yadi.sk] (browser renders soylentnews, slashdot, the BBC fine, but El Reg has jumped the shark with their latest redesign...displays HeeHaw for a hellishly long time)
      https://yadi.sk/i/sib87dzUmm1q_Q [yadi.sk] (playing music off the Clip Jam hanging off the USB)

      Btw, posting this via the beastie..

    • (Score: 2) by PartTimeZombie on Monday October 01 2018, @12:28AM (1 child)

      by PartTimeZombie (4827) Subscriber Badge on Monday October 01 2018, @12:28AM (#742187)

      I'm back baby!

      No success. I ran the Haiku installer after booting from a USB drive. It boots up nice and quickly, then prompts to create a partition on my (blank) disc, which I do, accepting the defaults.

      Reboot. Invalid Partition Table. Bugger.

      I can either trawl through the install docs to figure out what went wrong, or give up. I might have another look later in the week. Maybe.
      On the other hand, I installed and configured a NextCloud server running on Linux yesterday. It took a couple of hours and several beers, and was a doddle compared to Haiku.

      • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @03:40AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @03:40AM (#742228)

        Reboot. Invalid Partition Table. Bugger.

        From tonights faffing around, I *think* there's two gotchas to possibly watch for

        1. Partition Table Type: something about MBR-msdos/GPT-GUID caused me some initial aggro, even though the disk I used had an existing MBR Table and I was reusing one of the primary partitions as the destination for Haiku, I had set something in the partitioner to MBR-msdos on my machine during install, it then seemed to go ok.
        2. Partition ID: Even though during the install I changed the ID, formatted the partition as a BeOS one and then installed the OS to it, it borked on reboot. Make sure the ID/type *is* eb/BeOS, for some reason on my disk it ended up remaining 83/Linux, the original ID. Despite the installer being told to change it, it hadn't, so to make bloody sure I changed the partition ID to eb using fdisk from Linux then reinstalled...sweetness and light...It's now been up and running for just under 5 hours..
        Time now for some booze, then snooze..

    • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @02:52AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @02:52AM (#742214)

      Meh, the userland apocalypse where systemd is a dependency of everything has yet to happen.

      All the CoC means is that we'll need to keep an eye out for the patches the CIA/FBI/NSA/name-your-favorite-TLA rams through under the guise of butbut the female programmers! Then we'll fork. Easier said than done, sure, but all is not lost.

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @12:48AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @12:48AM (#742188)

    Haiku’s package management system is unique in a variety of ways. Rather than keeping a database of installed files with a set of tools to manage them, Haiku packages are a special type of compressed filesystem image, which is ‘mounted’ upon installation (and thereafter on each boot) by the packagefs, a kernel component.

    This means that the /system/ hierarchy is now read-only, since it is merely an amalgamation of the presently installed packages at the system level (and the same is true for the ~/config/ hierarchy, which contains all the packages installed at the user level), ensuring that the system files themselves are incorruptible.

    Since packages are merely “activated”, not installed, this means that the bootloader has been given some capacity to affect them: you can now boot into a previous package state (in case you took a bad update) or even blacklist individual files. (Blacklists can be made permanent through a settings file.)

    And of course, since the disk transactions for managing packages are limited to moving them between directories and in and out of the “activated packages” listing file, installations and uninstallations are practically instant. You can thus also manage the installed package set on a non-running Haiku system by mounting its boot disk and then manipulating the /system/packages directory and associated configuration files.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @10:07AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 01 2018, @10:07AM (#742273)

      ensuring that the system files themselves are incorruptible.

      As far as I can tell, it just means that in order to to corrupt the system files, you have to corrupt the corresponding package files.

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