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posted by martyb on Tuesday January 15 2019, @08:55AM   Printer-friendly
from the Not-available-in-stores! dept.

Intel Core i9-9990XE : Up to 5.0 GHz, Auction Only

AnandTech has seen documents and supporting information from multiple sources that show that Intel is planning to release a new high-end desktop processor, the Core i9-9990XE. These documents show that the processors will not be sold at retail; rather they will only be sold to system integrators, and then only through a closed online auction.

This new processor will be the highest numbered processor in Intel's high-end desktop line. The current top processor is the i9-9980XE, an 18 core part with a base frequency of 3.5 GHz and a turbo frequency of 4.0 GHz. The i9-9990XE, on the other hand, is not simply the 9980XE with an increase in frequency.

The Core i9-9990XE will be a 14 core processor, but with a base frequency of 4.0 GHz and a turbo frequency of 5.0 GHz. This makes it a super-binned 9940X.

AMD Radeon VII: less than 5000 available, no custom cards

The new Radeon VII otherwise known as Radeon 7 is a revamped Vega graphics card, where at the end of the day it's just a Radeon Instinct MI50 accelerator that was released in November last year. We have the same Vega 20 GPU on the fresh new 7nm node, the same 16GB of HBM2 memory, and similar GPU clocks to the new Radeon VII graphics card.

Since the announcement I reached out to some industry contacts who said there will be "less than 5000" made. The same source said AMD is losing money on each card sold as they are, as I said before, just Radeon Instinct MI50 cards that are being re-purposed into 'new' Radeon VII cards.

The improved cooler will keep it cooler than the Radeon Instinct MI50, while the same 300W TDP applies. Even the Radeon Instinct MI50 performance falls between the GeForce RTX 2070 and RTX 2080, while the new Radeon VII has performance that equals and will sometimes (higher resolutions like 4K and beyond) beat the RTX 2080.

Previously: AMD Announces Radeon VII GPU, Teases Third-Generation Ryzen CPU


Original Submission #1   Original Submission #2

Related Stories

AMD Announces Radeon VII GPU, Teases Third-Generation Ryzen CPU 15 comments

At AMD's CES 2019 keynote, CEO Lisa Su revealed the Radeon VII, a $700 GPU built on TSMC's "7nm" process. The GPU should have around the same performance and price as Nvidia's already-released RTX 2080. While it does not have any dedicated ray-tracing capabilities, it includes 16 GB of High Bandwidth Memory.

Nvidia's CEO has trashed his competitor's new GPU, calling it "underwhelming" and "lousy". Meanwhile, Nvidia has announced that it will support Adaptive Sync, the standardized version of AMD's FreeSync dynamic refresh rate and anti-screen tearing technology. Lisa Su also says that AMD is working on supporting ray tracing in future GPUs, but that the ecosystem is not ready yet.

Su also showed off a third-generation Ryzen CPU at the CES keynote, but did not announce a release date or lineup details. Like the second generation of Epyc server CPUs, the new Ryzen CPUs will be primarily built on TSMC's "7nm" process, but will include a "14nm" GlobalFoundries I/O part that includes the memory controllers and PCIe lanes. The CPUs will support PCIe 4.0.

The Ryzen 3000-series ("Matisse") should provide a roughly 15% single-threaded performance increase while significantly lowering power consumption. However, it has been speculated that the chips could include up to 16 cores or 8 cores with a separate graphics chiplet. AMD has denied that there will be a variant with integrated graphics, but Lisa Su has left the door open for 12- or 16-core versions of Ryzen, saying that "There is some extra room on that package, and I think you might expect we'll have more than eight cores". Here's "that package".

Also at The Verge.

Previously: Watch AMD's CES 2019 Keynote Live: 9am PT/12pm ET/5pm UK


Original Submission

AMD Responds to Radeon VII Short Supply Rumors 4 comments

AMD Responds to Radeon VII Short Supply Rumours

A few days ago we reported on rumours which alleged that AMD's Radeon VII graphics card would be in short supply, with a report claiming that AMD had "less than 5,000", units to sell.

The report also stated that AMD would also lose money on every graphics card sold, likely due to the device's workstation/datacenter origins and its use of 16GB of costly HBM2 memory.

This morning AMD has released an official response to these rumours, claiming that the company expects to meet demand from gamers, declining to release detailed production numbers. On top of that, AMD also confirmed that the company's AIB partners would be selling Radeon VII graphics cards, alongside their retail presence on AMD.com, which means that AMD has produced their new graphics card in large enough quantities for AIBs to receive a sizable stock allocation.

Will AMD's Lisa Su Step Up as Intel's Next CEO?

Intel's next CEO is a hot topic in the tech sector. Rumors suggest that the company plans to announce its new CEO before its fourth quarter of 2018 earnings release on January 24. Intel's only rival in the PC and server CPU market is Advanced Micro Devices (AMD). Speculation of an Intel–AMD merger keeps popping up, but it's unwarranted. The merger can never be a reality, as it would remove competition from the CPU market.

At CES 2019 (the Consumer Electronics Show), AMD overshadowed Intel with its 7nm (nanometer) product announcements. AMD's presentation once again sparked speculation of an Intel–AMD merger. An article in EE Times cited Jon Peddie Research vice president Kathleen Maher's views on this speculation.

She dismissed the speculation that Intel might acquire AMD, stating that AMD has nothing Intel wants except a CEO. Her comments were reiterated by Tirias Research principal analyst Kevin Krewell, who told EE Times that Intel "could try to hire Lisa Su, but that would be hard as well."

Previously: AMD Announces Radeon VII GPU, Teases Third-Generation Ryzen CPU
Intel Core i9-9990XE: Up to 5.0 GHz, Auction Only; AMD Radeon VII: Less Than 5,000 Available


Original Submission #1Original Submission #2

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  • (Score: 3, Touché) by coolgopher on Tuesday January 15 2019, @08:58AM (3 children)

    by coolgopher (1157) on Tuesday January 15 2019, @08:58AM (#786839)

    Great, it'll be even faster to exploit the speculative execution flaws they still haven't addressed!

    • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Tuesday January 15 2019, @09:52AM (1 child)

      by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Tuesday January 15 2019, @09:52AM (#786846) Homepage
      Oh, come on, this is clearly nothing more than a publicity stunt, trying to get people who remember the glory days of the GHz wars back to consciousness with a nice warm fuzzy feeling of nostalgia (and then hopefully to get them opening their wallets again, for whatever scraps are available).
      --
      Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
      • (Score: 4, Insightful) by coolgopher on Tuesday January 15 2019, @12:52PM

        by coolgopher (1157) on Tuesday January 15 2019, @12:52PM (#786876)

        Yeah that's kinda my point. They're doing everything they can to get people to forget about the glaring holes they haven't prioritized fixing. The more I see them trying, the more it makes me inclined to point out those severe security issues.

        Not that AMD's response to their own problems was all that great, but it was a damn sight better than Intel's!

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday January 15 2019, @11:23AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday January 15 2019, @11:23AM (#786853)

      Liquid nitrogen not included.

  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday January 15 2019, @10:57AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday January 15 2019, @10:57AM (#786849)

    These documents show that the processors will not be sold at retail; rather they will only be sold to system integrators, and then only through a closed online auction

    Oh, I thought they were going to put them on ebay, one at a time. A brilliant new way to fleece tech-youtubers (or at least their patreon supporters).

  • (Score: 1, Offtopic) by realDonaldTrump on Tuesday January 15 2019, @12:39PM

    by realDonaldTrump (6614) on Tuesday January 15 2019, @12:39PM (#786872) Homepage Journal

    Two of our biggest cyber Companies are working together. To make a very exclusive product. Less than 5000 made, they're doing an auction for this one. Something that, for one of them to do it by themselves would be almost impossible. One did the turbo. And the other did the accelerator. Very special digital, they made it much "cooler." With the highest number. Thinking about opening my wallet for this one, folks. For a certain very High I. Q. boy (Cyber Genius) with fabulous genes. Great stuff!

  • (Score: 1) by pTamok on Tuesday January 15 2019, @01:56PM (9 children)

    by pTamok (3042) on Tuesday January 15 2019, @01:56PM (#786883)

    Fewer than 5,000 available.

    If it is easily countable, its fewer, if it is a continuous quantity, or at least, not easily countable, it is less.

    And for those of you who don't care, the phrase is couldn't care less, not could care less, which makes no sense*.

    *Merriam-Webster sit's with it's butt firmly divided by the fence [merriam-webster.com], but mishandling of negatives aitn't not right, so I could care fewer about what you think.

    • (Score: 2) by ledow on Tuesday January 15 2019, @02:41PM (8 children)

      by ledow (5567) on Tuesday January 15 2019, @02:41PM (#786899) Homepage

      It was always couldn't care less.

      The "could care less" thing is people just parroting it incorrectly, it's an entirely American invention too (OED marks it as North American only).

      If you COULD care less, that means you care some amount already - i.e. you do care to some extent.
      If you COULDN'T care less, that it's literally impossible for you to care at a lower level than you already do... i.e. you care precisely zero.

      It always sounds like a child parroting a misheard phrase whenever I hear it.

      Fewer/less is just ignorance of a particular rule. "Could care less" is just "I haven't thought about what that phrase means at all" - like flammable / inflammable meaning the same thing, which also makes no sense.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday January 15 2019, @03:40PM (3 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday January 15 2019, @03:40PM (#786930)

        "flammable / inflammable" hahaha that's funny.
        i thought "flammable" is used for stuff that is supposed to be lite on fire ... whilst "inflamable" is used when you wan to use it but it
        might not be the best thing/material to use because it can (but should not) catch fire?
        nevermind, lame on!

        • (Score: 3, Informative) by pTamok on Tuesday January 15 2019, @05:49PM (1 child)

          by pTamok (3042) on Tuesday January 15 2019, @05:49PM (#786977)

          World Wide Words: Flammable [worldwidewords.org]

          The problem with inflammable is the in- at the front. English has many words in which it means “without” or “not”. A majority have been imported from Latin with the prefix already attached, such as infertile and inarticulate. Others, such as inexpensive and invariable, have had it added in English. We don’t turn words into their negatives using in- any more; we prefer un- or non-, or sometimes a-, but the aura of negativity surrounding in- is still very strong in our minds.

          Unfortunately, Latin had another in- prefix, whose root sense was the same as English in but which could sometimes strengthen the meaning of the word it was attached to, as in indoctrinate and incantation and also in inflammable. This is much less common or obvious, so much so that inflammable can all too easily be taken to mean “not capable of burning”, when it really means “very easily set on fire”.

        • (Score: 2) by takyon on Tuesday January 15 2019, @06:24PM

          by takyon (881) <{takyon} {at} {soylentnews.org}> on Tuesday January 15 2019, @06:24PM (#786986) Journal

          oblig [youtube.com]

          --
          [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 2, Insightful) by NateMich on Tuesday January 15 2019, @04:04PM (2 children)

        by NateMich (6662) on Tuesday January 15 2019, @04:04PM (#786945)

        it's literally impossible for you to care at a lower level than you already do

        It always sounds like a child parroting a misheard phrase whenever I hear it.

        And I remember as a child, correcting people using the very same explanation. It's a battle that can't be won.

        Now if I could just get my girlfriend to stop saying "exscape".

      • (Score: 1, Touché) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 17 2019, @07:08AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 17 2019, @07:08AM (#787809)

        I always used 'I could care less' to tell people to keep talking about something I still have room to care less about. Usually that gets them to shut up and stomp off in a huff, but sometimes they keep discussing it until I really couldn't care less, and then I just walk off :)

  • (Score: 1) by NateMich on Tuesday January 15 2019, @03:56PM

    by NateMich (6662) on Tuesday January 15 2019, @03:56PM (#786939)

    Intel really should have just called this the i9-9590.
    That would clear up any confusion about this part.

  • (Score: 3, Funny) by nobu_the_bard on Tuesday January 15 2019, @09:15PM

    by nobu_the_bard (6373) on Tuesday January 15 2019, @09:15PM (#787063)

    Imagine a whole Beowulf Cluster of these!

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