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posted by martyb on Tuesday April 30 2019, @03:04AM   Printer-friendly
from the gaming-fan dept.

This gaming phone has a built-in cooling fan and can record 8K video

We've already seen the likes of ASUS and Black Shark offering external cooling fans for their gaming smartphones, but the folks over at Nubia reckon it's about time to stuff a fan inside a phone (I mean, what else would you expect from a company that brought back the wearable phone?). Today, the Chinese brand unveiled the Red Magic 3 which not only packs a "liquid cooling" copper heat pipe, but also an internal cooling fan.

This small fan is said to run quietly but can spin up to 14,000 rpm, and it has an IP55 rating plus its own isolated chamber, so you won't have to worry about liquids and dust getting in. It's apparently good for over 30,000 hours of continuous use, though Nubia didn't specify the speed used for the test. Regardless, combining this fan with the heat pipe, the phone's heat transfer performance is apparently five times better than conventional passive cooling methods, thus ensuring a smooth gaming experience for a longer period.

Also at Android Authority.

Related: Mobile Gaming is Dominant in the Marketplace / Blame Loot Boxes
Nubia's Wearable Smartphone is a Preview of our Flexible OLED Future
Xiaomi Announces Smartphones with 10 GB of RAM
Nubia X Smartphone Ditches Front-Facing Camera, Adds Rear Display


Original Submission

Related Stories

Mobile Gaming is Dominant in the Marketplace / Blame Loot Boxes 9 comments

I've shunned all games that include loot boxes, pay-to-win, etc. for quite some time. It used to be that just meant not playing mobile games or the few MMORPGS (Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games) that consumed your life. I have recently taken to playing Gwent and Hearthstone some, but I've about given up on Hearthstone. There is some interesting content to be sure, but Hearthstone more so than Gwent seems to be very much pay-to-win. I've spent a grand total of $5 on the starter pack for Gwent, because after 10-20 hours worth of play I found I was having quite a bit of fun. I can actually win games against other people in Gwent. As for Hearthstone — it seems that no matter how I play there was no way I was going to win, because I don't have good enough cards.

With the massive user base of mobile platforms, it's not hard to believe that there's a lot of money rolling around. I just wish that mobile gaming wasn't by and large like playing in a Casino. Except, with mobile gaming, there's no chance of a payout.

https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2018/05/mobile-platforms-now-account-for-more-than-half-of-all-game-spending
https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2018/05/despite-backlash-loot-boxes-could-be-essential-to-gamings-future


Original Submission

Nubia’s Wearable Smartphone is a Preview of our Flexible OLED Future 16 comments

Submitted via IRC for AndyTheAbsurd:

The most interesting prototype at IFA this year was the Nubia Alpha, an Android-based device the company bills as a "wearable smartphone." The Alpha tries to realize one of the enduring gadget dreams: having a smart device with a display that wraps around the user's wrist. I checked it out at IFA in Berlin this past week, and, well, it's still at the rough draft stage of development, but Nubia is confident it'll have it ready to go on sale in China before the end of this year. If things work out, global distribution might also happen around the same time.

The demo units at IFA were behind glass, and it took a lot of cajoling to convince Nubia to even let me touch one. I was able to lay it on my wrist, but I wasn't allowed to close it up entirely, hence the semi-open position in these photos. The surprising thing was that, as bulky as the Alpha looks, it's really quite light and tolerable on the wrist. I believe fans of big watches will find this chunky beast attractive, while the rest of us should definitely be paying attention to the technological advancement it represents.

Source: https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2018/9/4/17817416/wearable-smartphone-nubia-alpha-flexible-oled-ifa-2018


Original Submission

Xiaomi Announces Smartphones with 10 GB of RAM 20 comments

Xiaomi Mi Mix 3 packs up to 10GB of RAM and a stunning 93% screen-to-body ratio

Following a tease by the company's president back in August, Chinese manufacturer Xiaomi has now officially announced its next all-screen monster handset, the Mi Mix 3.

Boasting a FHD+ AMOLED display with a stunning 93% screen-to-body ratio, the Mi Mix 3 also packs a powerful 2.8GHz Snapdragon 845 processor into its unique frame, along with the option of 6GB, 8GB or a whopping 10GB of RAM.

Those after the 10GB model will have to track down the 'Forbidden City' limited edition, which sports traditional Chinese styling, a 10W wireless Qi charger and a collectible statue.

All of the Mi Mix 3 phones will be exclusive to the Chinese market for now. The 10 GB version is priced at RMB 4,999 ($720).

Xiaomi also announced a gaming phone with up to 10 GB of RAM, the Black Shark Helo.

Also at Ars Technica and The Register.

Previously: Oppo Likely to Release the First Smartphone With 10 GB of RAM


Original Submission

Nubia X Smartphone Ditches Front-Facing Camera, Adds Rear Display 11 comments

Nubia X: a Dual-Display Smartphone with No Selfie Camera

Nubia, a ZTE brand, this week introduced its new range-topping smartphone outfitted with front and rear displays and Qualcomm's high-end SoC. The new Nubia X features a rare 93.6% screen-to-body ratio on the primary LCD, maximizing its screen real estate while also offering a serious performance. The phone will certainly catch some eyes, but what remains to be seen is how useful the second display is and how will it affect battery life of the device.

The two screens are naturally the key selling point of the Nubia X. The primary display is a 6.26-inch IPS LCD offering a 2280×1080 resolution, a 19:9 aspect ratio, and featuring no notch (as there is no camera). The secondary display is a 5.1-inch OLED that has the same aspect ratio, but a 1520×720 resolution. The screen on the rear of the smartphone blends with the device's aluminum body and is designed primarily for ultimate personalization (e.g., you can load your own unique wallpaper on the back and get a handset no one else has). To make selfies, as the Nubia X does not have a front-facing camera, users will use the main camera and the rear screen to do so.


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 5, Funny) by MostCynical on Tuesday April 30 2019, @03:18AM (4 children)

    by MostCynical (2589) on Tuesday April 30 2019, @03:18AM (#836505) Journal
    --
    "I guess once you start doubting, there's no end to it." -Batou, Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex
    • (Score: 2, Troll) by realDonaldTrump on Tuesday April 30 2019, @04:07AM (1 child)

      by realDonaldTrump (6614) on Tuesday April 30 2019, @04:07AM (#836530) Homepage Journal

      You're joking. But I remember when Briefcase Phones were a thing. You'd be meeting with a very rich, very powerful guy. And, you hear a phone ringing. Guy opens up his briefcase. And you realize, the ringing is coming from that. Something nobody thought could happen. And this guy's taking a call with his briefcase, he takes out the phone. Totally normal phone but it's plugged into his briefcase. And almost the whole inside of the briefcase is the very special cyber to make that phone work. To make the calls go back and forth. Amazing times, folks.

    • (Score: 1) by Rupert Pupnick on Tuesday April 30 2019, @12:10PM (1 child)

      by Rupert Pupnick (7277) on Tuesday April 30 2019, @12:10PM (#836638) Journal

      Also that fan better be quiet if you’re going to be holding it up near your ear.

      Also interested to know how a fan in an “isolated chamber” is going to have such fantastic heat transfer characteristics.

      • (Score: 2) by Alfred on Tuesday April 30 2019, @01:16PM

        by Alfred (4006) on Tuesday April 30 2019, @01:16PM (#836657) Journal
        Will hair get caught in it? That could be embarrassing.
  • (Score: 1, Troll) by PartTimeZombie on Tuesday April 30 2019, @03:49AM (2 children)

    by PartTimeZombie (4827) on Tuesday April 30 2019, @03:49AM (#836520)

    I wonder if many people will actually buy a mad phone like that? The other wearable one looks even stupider, but even if they're a total failure, it is quite good to see somebody taking a risk and doing something different.

    Those ideas might not work, but something cool might come out of it.

  • (Score: 2) by looorg on Tuesday April 30 2019, @12:07PM (1 child)

    by looorg (578) on Tuesday April 30 2019, @12:07PM (#836636)

    14k RPM is not going to be quiet, even with the best possible fans. Considering the size of it I suspect that little sucker is going to whine quite loudly at that speed. In some kind of idle mode at around 1k RPM you can hear normal sized fans without any problems, unless you are somehow deaf or in a noisy environment. This little thing is going to be closer to your face then a computer fan normally is so I would toss out the idea of quiet. That is unless you have your headphones in/on and are blasting pew-pew sounds as you game on your smartphone (don't even get me started ...) as that might mask some of the sound. Otherwise just NO, not going to be quiet at all.

    Is having your phone overheating and shutting down even a real issue? As noted it might be a "gamer phone" specific issue.

    • (Score: 2) by Alfred on Tuesday April 30 2019, @01:18PM

      by Alfred (4006) on Tuesday April 30 2019, @01:18PM (#836658) Journal
      Maybe the fan is only used when you are plugged in? That would hurt games on the run but tech is notorious for citing best case specs when the normal use case is way different.
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