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posted by Fnord666 on Friday May 24 2019, @02:55AM   Printer-friendly
from the let's-do-the-starlink-agaaaain dept.

[Update (20190524_025416 UTC): Launch successful so far, booster landing successful, second stage is now in coast phase, satellite deployment coming up in about 40 minutes. Correction on YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riBaVeDTEWI.]

On May 20th, SpaceX tweeted: "Now targeting May 23 for launch of Starlink from Pad 40 in Florida".

According to Spaceflightnow:

May 23/24 Falcon 9 • Starlink 1
Launch time: 0230-0400 GMT on 24th (10:30 p.m.-12:00 a.m. EDT on 23rd/24th)

Launch site: SLC-40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch 60 satellites for SpaceX's Starlink broadband network. Scrubbed on May 15 and May 16.

The launch will be Live-Streamed on YouTube:

Scheduled for May 23, 2019

SpaceX is targeting Thursday, May 23 for the launch of 60 Starlink satellites from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. SpaceX's Starlink is a next-generation satellite network capable of connecting the globe, especially reaching those who are not yet connected, with reliable and affordable broadband internet services.

The launch window opens at 10:30 p.m. EDT on May 23, or 2:30 UTC on May 24, and closes at 12:00 a.m. on May 24, or 4:00 UTC. A backup launch window opens on Friday, May 24 at 10:30 p.m. EDT, or 2:30 UTC on May 25, and closes at 12:00 a.m. on May 25, or 4:00 UTC. Falcon 9's first stage for this mission previously supported the Telstar 18 VANTAGE mission in September 2018 and the Iridium-8 mission in January 2019. Following stage separation, SpaceX will attempt to land Falcon 9's first stage on the "Of Course I Still Love You" droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean. Approximately one hour and two minutes after liftoff, the Starlink satellites will begin deployment at an altitude of 440km. They will then use onboard propulsion to reach an operational altitude of 550km.

Previous coverage:
SpaceX to Launch 60 Starlink Satellites at Once, and More,
SpaceX to Launch 60 Starlink Satellites: Postponed 1 Day Due to Upper Altitude Winds
SpaceX *was* going to Try Starlink Launch Again Today; Mission Scrubbed.


Original Submission

Related Stories

SpaceX to Launch 60 Starlink Satellites at Once, and More 13 comments

takyon, realDonaldTrump and James Orme bring us news of all things SpaceX:

SpaceX to Launch 60 Starlink Satellites at Once, and More

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk reveals radical Starlink redesign for 60-satellite launch

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has published the first official photo of the company's near-final Starlink design and confirmed that Falcon 9 will launch a staggering 60 satellites on May 15th.

Known internally as Starlink v0.9, this mission will not be the first launch of operational satellites, but it will be the first internal SpaceX mission with a dedicated Falcon 9 launch. Additionally, the payload will be the heaviest yet launched by SpaceX, signifying an extraordinarily ambitious first step towards realizing the company's ~12,000-satellite Starlink megaconstellation.

Put simply, SpaceX's Starlink v0.9 launch is extremely unique for several reasons. Aside from the unprecedented step of launching 60 spacecraft weighing ~13,000 kg (~30,000 lb) on a developmental mission, both the form factor of each satellite and the style of dispenser/payload adapter has never been seen before. SpaceX appears to have settled on a square dispenser with four separate quadrants for satellites. The satellites themselves look truly bizarre – it's actually difficult to discern where one spacecraft stops and the next begins. Nevertheless, it appears that each Starlink satellite is a relatively thin rectangle, possibly with a squared top and bottom. It's also possible that they are all around rectangular and that the dispenser instead has two main sections.

SpaceX to Launch 60 Starlink Satellites: Postponed 1 Day Due to Upper Altitude Winds [UPDATE 2] 16 comments

[UPDATE #1 20190516_015859 UTC to reflect change in scheduled window start being delayed 30 minutes. --martyb]

[UPDATE #2 20190516_025012 UTC Launch scrubbed for today; will try again during backup 90-minute window which starts 2230 EDT May 16 (0230 UTC May 17). Just as the broadcast went live, they learned the upper altitude winds were outside of allowable bounds and they decided to postpone the launch until the backup window. --martyb]

Yesterday (May 13th), we posted a story SpaceX to Launch 60 Starlink Satellites at Once, and More. Here are a few more details about Starlink and — more importantly — the launch schedule and a link to the YouTube page to follow along.

SpaceX plans to launch 60 satellites tonight for its next round of development and test towards its goal of deploying Starlink:

SpaceX has plans to deploy nearly 12,000 satellites in three orbital shells by the mid-2020s: initially placing approximately 1600 in a 550-kilometer (340 mi)-altitude shell, subsequently placing ~2800 Ku- and Ka-band spectrum sats at 1,150 km (710 mi) and ~7500 V-band sats at 340 km (210 mi). The total cost of the decade-long project to design, build and deploy such a network is estimated at nearly US$10 billion.

SpaceX *was* going to Try Starlink Launch Again Today; Mission Scrubbed 6 comments

[Updated 20190517_020607 UTC. According to SpaceX's twitter feed:

Standing down to update satellite software and triple-check everything again. Always want to do everything we can on the ground to maximize mission success, next launch opportunity in about a week.

Original story follows.

-- Ed.]

From the live stream on YouTube:

SpaceX is targeting Thursday, May 16 for the launch of 60 Starlink satellites from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. SpaceX’s Starlink is a next-generation satellite network capable of connecting the globe, especially reaching those who are not yet connected, with reliable and affordable broadband internet services.

The launch window opens at 10:30 p.m. EDT, or 2:30 UTC on May 17, and closes at 12:00 a.m. on May 17, or 4:00 UTC. Falcon 9’s first stage for this mission previously supported the Telstar 18 VANTAGE mission in September 2018 and the Iridium-8 mission in January 2019. Following stage separation, SpaceX will attempt to land Falcon 9’s first stage on the “Of Course I Still Love You” droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean. Approximately one hour and two minutes after liftoff, the Starlink satellites will begin deployment at an altitude of 440km. They will then use onboard propulsion to reach an operational altitude of 550km.

The live stream historically "goes live" approximately 15 minutes before launch which should be 1 hour from the time this story goes live.

Yesterday's launch attempt was cancelled due to unacceptable high-altitude winds. Courtesy of the National Weather Service, here is the current forecast and the hourly forecast for Cape Canaveral.


Original Submission

Three of SpaceX's Starlink Satellites have Failed 27 comments

SpaceX's Starlink program launched an initial sixty satellites on May 23. At least three of these "are no longer in service" and "will passively deorbit." according to a spokesperson for the company.

In other words, the three spacecraft failed and will fall back to Earth, likely within a year because of their relatively low orbit of 273 miles (440 kilometers) above the planet's surface.

SpaceX seems relatively unfazed by the failures, though, since the company never expected all of them to function perfectly given the mission's experimental nature.

SpaceX intentionally implemented the satellites with minor variations.

On a brighter note, 45 of the satellites, which are equipped with small ion engines for maneuvering, have already reached their intended orbits. Five are moving towards their orbits, and five are pending evaluation before maneuvering. Another "[t]wo satellites are being intentionally deorbited to simulate an end of life disposal."

[N]ow that the majority of the satellites have reached their operational altitude, SpaceX will begin using the constellation to start transmitting broadband signals, testing the latency and capacity by streaming videos and playing some high bandwidth video games using gateways throughout North America.

The Starlink program was stung by early comments that the program was negatively affecting astronomy and SpaceX

added that it "continues to monitor the visibility of the satellites as they approach their final orbit" and that they will be measured for their visibility from the ground once there. Those comments are likely meant to address concerns lodged by astronomers about the reflectivity of Starlink spacecraft

The satellites are designed to completely disintegrate upon entering Earth's atmosphere, and the failures may help drive future iterations.

Previous Coverage
Most of SpaceX's Starlink Internet Satellites are Already on Track
SpaceX Satellites Pose New Headache for Astronomers
Third Time's the Charm! SpaceX Launch Good; Starlink Satellite Deployment Coming Up [Updated]
SpaceX to Launch 60 Starlink Satellites: Postponed 1 Day Due to Upper Altitude Winds [UPDATE 2]
SpaceX to Launch 60 Starlink Satellites at Once, and More
SpaceX's First Dedicated Starlink Launch Set for May; Amazon Hired SpaceX Execs for Project Kuiper


Original Submission

SpaceX's Starship Can Launch 400 Starlink Satellites at Once 21 comments

SpaceX President and COO Gwynne Shotwell has revealed that Starship can carry 400 Starlinks satellites into orbit, up from the 60 recently launched using a Falcon 9 rocket. The cost per launch may be negligible:

Beyond Shotwell's clear confidence that Starlink's satellite technology is far beyond OneWeb and years ahead of Amazon's Project Kuiper clone, she also touched on yet another strength: SpaceX's very own vertically-integrated launch systems. OneWeb plans to launch the vast majority of its Phase 1 constellation on Arianespace's commercial Soyuz rockets, with the launch contract alone expected to cost more than $1B for ~700 satellites.

SpaceX, on the other hand, owns, builds, and operates its own rocket factory and high-performance orbital launch vehicles and is the only company on Earth to have successfully fielded reusable rockets. In short, although Starlink's voracious need for launch capacity will undoubtedly require some major direct investments, a large portion of SpaceX's Starlink launch costs can be perceived as little more than the cost of propellant, work-hours, and recovery fleet operations. Boosters (and hopefully fairings) can be reused ad nauseum and so long as SpaceX sticks to its promise to put customer missions first, the practical opportunity cost of each Starlink launch should be close to zero.

[...] Shotwell revealed that a single Starship-Super Heavy launch should be able to place at least 400 Starlink satellites in orbit – a combined payload mass of ~120 metric tons (265,000 lb). Even if the cost of a Starship launch remained identical to Starlink v0.9's flight-proven Falcon 9, packing almost seven times as many Starlink satellites would singlehandedly cut the relative cost of launch per satellite by more than the 5X figure Musk noted.

In light of this new figure of 400 satellites per individual Starship launch, it's far easier to understand why SpaceX took the otherwise ludicrous step of reserving space for tens of thousands more Starlink satellites. Even if SpaceX arrives at a worst-case-scenario and is only able to launch Starship-Super Heavy once every 4-8 weeks for the first several years, that could translate to 2400-4800 Starlink satellites placed in orbit every year. Given that 120 tons to LEO is well within Starship's theoretical capabilities without orbital refueling, it's entirely possible that Starship could surpass Falcon 9's Starlink mass-to-orbit almost immediately after it completes its first orbital launch and recovery: a single Starship launch would be equivalent to almost 7 Falcon 9 missions.

The Starlink constellation can begin commercial operations with just 360-400 satellites, or 1,200 for global coverage. SpaceX has demonstrated a 610 Mbps connection to an in-flight U.S. military C-12 aircraft. SpaceX is planning to launch 60 additional Starlink satellites in November, marking the first reuse of a thrice-flown Falcon 9 booster.

Also at CNBC.

Previously: Third Time's the Charm! SpaceX Launch Good; Starlink Satellite Deployment Coming Up [Updated]
SpaceX Provides Update on Starship with Assembled Prototype as the Backdrop
SpaceX Requests Permission to Launch an Additional 30,000 Starlink Satellites, to a Total of 42,000+
Elon Musk Sends Tweet Via SpaceX's Starlink Satellite Broadband
SpaceX: Land Starship on Moon Before 2022, Then Do Cargo Runs for 2024 Human Landing


Original Submission

SpaceX to Become World's Largest Satellite Operator; Launch, Booster Landing Successful [UPDATED] 18 comments

[UPDATE (20200107_023514 UTC): Launch went off smoothly and on time. Booster landed safely on the drone ship. Second stage is in proper orbit and currently in coast phase leading up to satellite deployment.]

With Monday night launch, SpaceX to become world's largest satellite operator:

In 2019 SpaceX launched two batches of 60 Starlink satellites—one experimental, and the second operational. On Monday, the company plans to add 60 more satellites with a nighttime launch of the Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

If all goes to plan, this mission will be just the first of as many as 20 Starlink launches this year as SpaceX builds up a constellation of satellites in low-Earth orbit to provide global Internet service. SpaceX may begin to offer "bumpy" service by the middle of this year to some consumers.

Following this next launch, scheduled for 9:19pm ET Monday (02:19 UTC Tuesday), SpaceX will have a constellation of nearly 180 satellites in low-Earth orbit, each weighing a little more than 220kg. This will make the company simultaneously the world's largest private satellite operator (eclipsing Planet Labs), while also being the most active private launch company.

[...] Monday night's launch attempt will occur on a Falcon 9 first stage that has flown three times previously, in September 2018 (Telstar 18 VANTAGE), January 2019 (Iridium-8), and May 2019 (the first experimental Starlink mission). After launching, the first stage will land on the "Of Course I Still Love You" droneship offshore in the Atlantic Ocean. Another vessel, "Ms. Tree," will attempt to recover a payload fairing half. The Starlink satellites themselves will deploy at 61 minutes into the mission, at an altitude of 290km.

A webcast of the mission should begin about 15 minutes prior to launch.

Link to the YouTube webcast.

Previously:


Original Submission #1Original Submission #2

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  • (Score: 1) by shrewdsheep on Thursday May 23 2019, @10:41AM (2 children)

    by shrewdsheep (5215) on Thursday May 23 2019, @10:41AM (#846586)

    This thread is just not taking off...

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Thursday May 23 2019, @10:50AM (1 child)

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Thursday May 23 2019, @10:50AM (#846590) Journal

      Come back in... 15 hours.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Thursday May 23 2019, @08:28PM

        by Freeman (732) on Thursday May 23 2019, @08:28PM (#846776) Journal

        'bah, at first I thought it was 10:30AM - 12PM. Guess I'll read about it tomorrow. Hopefully a "Success!" kind of story and not a "Kaboom!" or "See You Next Week" kind of story.

        --
        Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 23 2019, @09:40PM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 23 2019, @09:40PM (#846807)

    Anyone giving odds on Tesla and SpaceX going bankrupt in the same year?

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by takyon on Friday May 24 2019, @02:36AM (1 child)

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Friday May 24 2019, @02:36AM (#846904) Journal

      Not happening. SpaceX is already profitable, and if these Starlink launches are successful, they will be really profitable.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 24 2019, @08:36PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 24 2019, @08:36PM (#847345)

        I can't wait to dump my isp or watch them rush to bring in 1Gbps and drop prices to compete. When i save up enough to move, i could live in the middle of nowhere and have good internet. It's the biggest part of all of this. Freedom to live anywhere, assuming you can get there and defend yourself from tyrannical governments.

  • (Score: 2) by takyon on Friday May 24 2019, @03:31AM (8 children)

    by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Friday May 24 2019, @03:31AM (#846930) Journal

    Spew flatsats into orbit, plz.

    --
    [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
    • (Score: 4, Interesting) by takyon on Friday May 24 2019, @03:51AM (7 children)

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Friday May 24 2019, @03:51AM (#846933) Journal

      https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/05/first-starlink-mission-heaviest-payload-launch-spacex/ [nasaspaceflight.com]

      Orbital position, navigation, and precision pointing for each Starlink is enabled in part by a Startracker system that is built upon the same Startracker used by the cargo and crew Dragon spacecrafts developed by SpaceX.

      More impressively, the Startracker system will allow each Starlink to independently track on-orbit debris and autonomously fire its Hall thrusters to avoid debris.

      [...] Mr. Musk also noted that the 60 starlink satellite count for this mission is not the maximum number of Starlinks SpaceX could have packed on board the Falcon 9. If SpaceX were to sacrifice recovery and reuse of the first stage of the Falcon 9, they could have added more Starlinks into the payload fairing.

      Sounds like 60 per launch is going to be the norm for a while, unless Falcon Heavy is worth it just to launch X more flatsats.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 1) by nitehawk214 on Friday May 24 2019, @02:45PM (6 children)

        by nitehawk214 (1304) on Friday May 24 2019, @02:45PM (#847089)

        Unless they can jam 180 of them into the payload fairing, why not just launch 3 separate Falcon 9 with 60 each?

        Though, I suppose there is a per-launch overhead. I wonder what the cost savings is of Falcon Heavy in this situation.

        --
        "Don't you ever miss the days when you used to be nostalgic?" -Loiosh
        • (Score: 2) by takyon on Friday May 24 2019, @03:20PM (5 children)

          by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Friday May 24 2019, @03:20PM (#847101) Journal

          SpaceX has said that Falcon 9 costs $62 million to launch, and Falcon Heavy $90 million to launch. These definitely don't reflect SpaceX's real costs. If they can use the hardware repeatedly (the main goal of Block 5), the extra Falcon Heavy cost becomes the cost of refilling the side boosters for the most part. The use of either rocket expends the upper stage, but all of the boosters will be recovered (hopefully with no dumb drone ship accidents like the last Falcon Heavy launch).

          If a Falcon Heavy launch ultimately costs only 10% more for SpaceX, but they can fit at least 7 more flatsats in the payload fairing because of it, then they should launch Starlink using Falcon Heavy. This could have a side benefit of increasing U.S. confidence in Falcon Heavy, important if it is going to get a contract to send a bunch of stuff to the Moon.

          The main issue is the payload fairing volume. It's the same for both Falcon 9 and Heavy, and it's pretty small. BFR/Starship blows that out of the water. It could probably lift 300-400 of these satellites, with payload mass being the constraint. It would also lower costs due to full reusability. Finally, using BFR for Starlink launches could help demonstrate that the rocket works. They could even put less than 60 flatsats (to cut losses if it blows up) on initial test flights and still save money vs. a Falcon 9 launch.

          --
          [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
          • (Score: 1) by nitehawk214 on Friday May 24 2019, @04:19PM (4 children)

            by nitehawk214 (1304) on Friday May 24 2019, @04:19PM (#847144)

            This makes sense. I see why FH has to use the same payload fairing as F9, its basically the same rocket.

            At this point BFR is at the same level as SLS. Mostly on paper with parts testing being done. I am not sure New Glenn is even close to that stage. I guess Falcon Heavy is the way to go on these.

            --
            "Don't you ever miss the days when you used to be nostalgic?" -Loiosh
            • (Score: 2) by takyon on Friday May 24 2019, @04:53PM (3 children)

              by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Friday May 24 2019, @04:53PM (#847167) Journal

              Two orbital Starship prototypes are being built simultaneously now:

              SpaceX’s orbital Starship gains a nose as East Coast prototype makes progress [teslarati.com]

              Raptor engine production is ramping up, and a vacuum-optimized version appears to be back on the table:

              SpaceX’s space-optimized Starship engine could be ready sooner than later [teslarati.com]

              Starhopper testing is underway, with another test possible on May 31.

              I would not be surprised to see it head to orbit this year, long before SLS goes anywhere. Although that doesn't include the big booster and it certainly doesn't look like a polished spacecraft. However, if they build a third, substantially complete prototype with retractable fairing and all the other bells and whistles, they could use it to launch Starlink satellites. Since it's fully reusable, they only need to build one as long as they don't blow it up. Or perhaps one per launch site so that satellites can be built and launched from each location.

              One point of interest is that the Starship will supposedly be able to get into low Earth orbit without the booster, although payload mass may be little to non-existent. There's not much more we can say about that until we get more details, but it could qualify as a single-stage-to-orbit reusable spaceship.

              --
              [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
              • (Score: 1) by nitehawk214 on Friday May 24 2019, @06:17PM (2 children)

                by nitehawk214 (1304) on Friday May 24 2019, @06:17PM (#847259)

                I thought Starship needed to be on top of BFR to get in to space? The current prototype is just a 3rd stage that can take off from Mars and fly around on Earth, but not get into orbit, much less escape velocity.

                And is it capable of deploying satellites? I thought Starship was a crew capsule.

                I am more concerned with SLS and BFR. Even if the Orion capsule or Starship or whatever the heck capsule Boeing is making all don't pan out; at least we have some heavy lift rockets to put new stuff into space.

                --
                "Don't you ever miss the days when you used to be nostalgic?" -Loiosh
                • (Score: 2) by takyon on Friday May 24 2019, @08:12PM (1 child)

                  by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Friday May 24 2019, @08:12PM (#847329) Journal

                  Big Falcon Rocket = Big Falcon Spaceship (Starship) + Big Falcon Booster (Super Heavy).

                  Starship is designed to take off from Mars, Moon, etc. without the booster. But it's so powerful, that it may be able to get from terra firma to low Earth orbit by itself, and still have enough fuel to land back on Earth. It just won't be able to carry anywhere near 100+ tons of payload to LEO if it does that.

                  Normal use of Starship is supposed to be: It uses a booster which returns to Earth early on, the Starship reaches some distance in Earth orbit, and two Starships (one being a "fuel tanker" version) can dock butt to butt to transfer fuel, allowing one Starship to continue and land 100+ tons on almost any solar system destination. Moon and Mars being obvious ones, but nothing's stopping it from going to Callisto or Titan. In some cases, mulitiple refuels may be required for it to get all the delta-v it needs.

                  Low Earth orbit is easier since it should never need a refuel to carry the first 100 or so tons there. Maybe we can come up with a scenario where a huge ~300 ton payload gets into extremely low Earth orbit and is boosted by a refuel, but that's unlikely to happen since payloads aren't currently designed to be so massive.

                  There will be a cargo version of BFR. I would expect the cargo version to come before the manned version since it is less sophisticated. Instead of a self-contained life support system and various living quarters and controls, and an exit that includes a crane for lifting people/cargo/robots out, cargo version just needs to open up a huge exit in the fairing and reattach itself (fairing will not separate from the spacecraft/upper stage as with Falcon 9 and other rockets).

                  The illustrations here [teslarati.com] will give you an idea of how the cargo version should look.

                  In my opinion, the cargo version is more important since it will be able to fit giant space telescopes (JWST) within the 9-meter fairing without folding, or even bigger telescopes like ~15-meter LUVOIR-A with some folding. It would also be capable of launching lots of Starlink satellites, which will be a top priority for the company if it becomes the big revenue generator that they predict.

                  There is an additional place for cargo: rear/aft cargo [i.redd.it] in the bottom surrounding the Raptor engines. These could be replaced by additional Raptor engines on future variations.

                  All details subject to error/change.

                  --
                  [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
                  • (Score: 1) by nitehawk214 on Friday May 24 2019, @08:31PM

                    by nitehawk214 (1304) on Friday May 24 2019, @08:31PM (#847341)

                    Ahh ok, I think the specs have changed since the last time I looked at it. I wasn't aware Starship was designed as a SSTO.

                    Also, a 9m fairing would be awesome. I think SLS block 1B is only 8.5 New Glenn is only supposed to be 7, if it ever flies.

                    People always talk about tonnage to orbit, which while important, isn't useful if the spacecraft can't fit on the rocket.

                    --
                    "Don't you ever miss the days when you used to be nostalgic?" -Loiosh
  • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Friday May 24 2019, @06:04PM (1 child)

    by bob_super (1357) on Friday May 24 2019, @06:04PM (#847239)

    What's crossing the top left of the screen at 1:17:50 ? That's not small or far.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 24 2019, @08:39PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 24 2019, @08:39PM (#847347)

      it was a big mac wrapper from the cockpit.

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