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posted by martyb on Tuesday June 11 2019, @04:47AM   Printer-friendly
from the Good-Fast-AND-Cheap[er-than-Intel] dept.

At AMD's keynote at the 2019 Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3), AMD CEO Lisa Su announced three new "7nm" Navi GPUs and a new CPU.

The AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT will have 2560 stream processors (40 compute units) capable of 9.75 TFLOPs of FP32 performance, with 8 GB of 14 Gbps GDDR6 VRAM. The price is $449. The AMD RX 5700 cuts that down to 2304 SPs (36 CUs), 7.9 TFLOPs, at $379. There is a higher clocked "50th anniversary" version of the 5700 XT that offers up to 10.14 teraflops for $499. A teraflop on one of these new cards supposedly means better graphics performance than older Polaris-based GPUs:

Looking at these clockspeed values then, in terms of raw throughput the new card is expected to get between 9 TFLOPs and 9.75 TFLOPs of FP32 compute/shading throughput. This is a decent jump over the Polaris cards, but on the surface it doesn't look like a huge, generational jump, and this is where AMD's RDNA architecture comes in. AMD has made numerous optimizations to improve their GPU utilization – that is, how well they put those FLOPs to good use – so a teraflop on a 5700 card means more than it does on preceding AMD cards. Overall, AMD says that they're getting around 25% more work done per clock on the whole in gaming workloads. So raw specs can be deceiving.

The GPUs do not include real-time raytracing or variable rate pixel shading support. These may appear on a future generation of GPUs. Instead, AMD talked about support for DisplayPort 1.4 with Display Stream Compression, a contrast-enhancing post-processing filter, AMD Radeon Image Sharpening, and a Radeon Anti-lag feature to reduce input lag.

Towards the end of the presentation, AMD revealed the 16-core Ryzen 9 3950X, the company's fully-fledged Ryzen CPU with two 8-core "7nm" Zen 2 chiplets. Compared to the 12-core Ryzen 9 3900X CPU, the 3950X has a slightly higher boost clock and L2 cache, with the same 105 Watt TDP, for $749. This is the full lineup so far:

CPUCores / ThreadsFrequencyTDPPrice
Ryzen 9 3950X16 / 323.5 - 4.7 GHz105 W$749
Ryzen 9 3900X12 / 243.8 - 4.6 GHz105 W$499
Ryzen 7 3800X8 / 163.9 - 4.5 GHz105 W$399
Ryzen 7 3700X8 / 163.6 - 4.4 GHz65 W$329
Ryzen 5 3600X6 / 123.8 - 4.4 GHz95 W$249
Ryzen 5 36006 / 123.6 - 4.2 GHz65 W$199

Previously: AMD and Intel at Computex 2019: First Ryzen 3000-Series CPUs and Navi GPU Announced


Original Submission

Related Stories

AMD and Intel at Computex 2019: First Ryzen 3000-Series CPUs and Navi GPU Announced 20 comments

At Computex 2019 in Taipei, AMD CEO Lisa Su gave a keynote presentation announcing the first "7nm" Navi GPU and Ryzen 3000-series CPUs. All of the products will support PCI Express 4.0.

Contrary to recent reports, AMD says that the Navi microarchitecture is not based on Graphics Core Next (GCN), but rather a new "RDNA" macroarchitecture ('R' for Radeon), although the extent of the difference is not clear. There is also no conflict with Nvidia's naming scheme; the 5000-series naming is a reference to the company's 50th anniversary.

AMD claims that Navi GPUs will have 25% better performance/clock and 50% better performance/Watt vs. Vega GPUs. AMD Radeon RX 5700 is the first "7nm" Navi GPU to be announced. It was compared with Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2070, with the RX 5700 outperforming the RTX 2070 by 10% in the AMD-favorable game Strange Brigade. Pricing and other launch details will be revealed on June 10.

AMD also announced the first five Ryzen 3000-series CPUs, all of which will be released on July 7:

CPUCores / ThreadsFrequencyTDPPrice
Ryzen 9 3900X12 / 243.8 - 4.6 GHz105 W$499
Ryzen 7 3800X8 / 163.9 - 4.5 GHz105 W$399
Ryzen 7 3700X8 / 163.6 - 4.4 GHz65 W$329
Ryzen 5 3600X6 / 123.8 - 4.4 GHz95 W$249
Ryzen 5 36006 / 123.6 - 4.2 GHz65 W$199

The Ryzen 9 3900X is the only CPU in the list using two core chiplets, each with 6 of 8 cores enabled. AMD has held back on releasing a 16-core monster for now. AMD compared the Ryzen 9 3900X to the $1,189 Intel Core i9-9920X, the Ryzen 7 3800X to the $499 Intel Core i9-9900K, and the Ryzen 7 3700X to the Intel Core i7-9700K, with the AMD chips outperforming the Intel chips in certain single and multi-threaded benchmarks (wait for the reviews before drawing any definitive conclusions). All five of the processors will come with a bundled cooler, as seen in this list.

Intel Internal Memo Addresses AMD's Zen Success 16 comments

Intel internal memo highlights competitive challenges AMD poses

A recent post on Intel's employee-only portal titled, "AMD competitive profile: Where we go toe-to-toe, why they are resurgent, which chips of ours beat theirs," has found its way to Reddit and offers a fascinating glimpse into how Intel perceives one of its largest competitors and the challenges it is posing to some of its divisions.

[...] Penned by Walden Kirsch as part of "the latest in a Circuit News series on Intel's major competitors," the piece notes how AMD was the best-performing stock on the S&P 500 last year and enjoyed its second straight year of greater than 20 percent annual revenue growth in 2018. One of the reasons for AMD's resurgence, Kirsch surmises, is its strategic re-focus on high-performance products in the desktop, datacenter and server markets.

Specifically, Kirsch highlighted AMD's use of TSMC's 7nm manufacturing process, victories in public cloud offerings and its next-gen Zen-core products as factors that will "amplify the near-term competitive challenge from AMD."

[...] The company believes its 9th Gen Core processors will beat AMD's Ryzen-based products in lightly threaded productivity benchmarks as well as in gaming benchmarks. With regard to multi-threaded workloads, Intel said AMD's Matisse "is expected to lead."

Soon to be discontinued internal news series.

See also: Platform Storage Face-Off: AMD Upsets Intel
AMD Ryzen 16 Core 5.2GHz CPU Benchmark Leaked, Crushes Intel's i9 9980XE
AMD Ryzen 5 3600 6 Core, 12 Thread CPU Tested on X470 Platform – Single-Core Performance On Par With The Core i9-9900K
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X Benchmarks Leaked, Crushes Intel's i9 9900K in Multi-threaded Performance

Related: Intel's Processors Lose More Performance From Vulnerability Mitigations Than AMD's
AMD and Intel at Computex 2019: First Ryzen 3000-Series CPUs and Navi GPU Announced
HP Boss: Intel Shortages are Steering Our Suited Customers to Buy AMD
AMD Details Three Navi GPUs and First Mainstream 16-Core CPU


Original Submission

Nvidia Refreshes RTX 2000-Series GPUs With "Super" Branding 9 comments

The GeForce RTX 2070 Super & RTX 2060 Super Review: Smaller Numbers, Bigger Performance

NVIDIA is launching a mid-generation kicker for their mid-to-high-end video card lineup in the form of their GeForce RTX 20 series Super cards. Based on the same family of Turing GPUs as the original GeForce RTX 20 series cards, these new Super cards – all suffixed Super, appropriately enough – come with new configurations and new clockspeeds. They are, essentially, NVIDIA's 2019 card family for the $399+ video card market.

When they are released on July 9th, the GeForce RTX 20 series Super cards are going to be sharing store shelves with the rest of the GeForce RTX 20 series cards. Some cards like the RTX 2080 and RTX 2070 are set to go away, while other cards like the RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2060 will remain on the market as-is. In practice, it's probably best to think of the new cards as NVIDIA executing as either a price cut or a spec bump – depending on if you see the glass as half-empty or half-full – all without meaningfully changing their price tiers.

In terms of performance, the RTX 2060 and RTX 2070 Super cards aren't going to bring anything new to the table. In fact if we're being blunt, the RTX 2070 Super is basically a slightly slower RTX 2080, and the RTX 2060 Super may as well be the RTX 2070. So instead, what has changed is the price that these performance levels are available at, and ultimately the performance-per-dollar ratios in parts of NVIDIA's lineup. The performance of NVIDIA's former $699 and $499 cards will now be available for $499 and $399, respectively. This leaves the vanilla RTX 2060 to hold the line at $349, and the upcoming RTX 2080 Super to fill the $699 spot. Which means if you're in the $400-$700 market for video cards, your options are about to get noticeably faster.

Also at Tom's Hardware, The Verge, and Ars Technica.

Previously: Nvidia Announces RTX 2080 Ti, 2080, and 2070 GPUs, Claims 25x Increase in Ray-Tracing Performance
Nvidia Announces RTX 2060 GPU
AMD and Nvidia's Latest GPUs Are Expensive and Unappealing

Related: AMD and Intel at Computex 2019: First Ryzen 3000-Series CPUs and Navi GPU Announced
AMD Details Three Navi GPUs and First Mainstream 16-Core CPU


Original Submission

AMD Cuts Prices of RX 5700 Navi GPUs Two Days Before Release 5 comments

AMD cuts Radeon 5700 GPU prices just two days before their release

When AMD announced its next-gen Navi-based Radeon RX 5700 and 5700 XT graphics cards last month, the news was just slightly underwhelming because the prices didn't necessarily make them the obvious alternative to Nvidia's rival chips.

But just two days before their July 7th launch date, AMD has taken the drastic step of dropping the prices on these new GPUs.

The Radeon 5700 XT, previously listed at $450, will now cost $400, and the Radeon 5700, previously $380, will be priced at $350. (There's also a $500 Radeon RX 5700 XT 50th Anniversary Edition that'll retail for $450.)

That's just super.

Also at Tom's Hardware.

Previously: AMD and Intel at Computex 2019: First Ryzen 3000-Series CPUs and Navi GPU Announced
AMD Details Three Navi GPUs and First Mainstream 16-Core CPU
Nvidia Refreshes RTX 2000-Series GPUs With "Super" Branding


Original Submission

AMD's 8-core Ryzen 7 3700X and 12-core Ryzen 9 3900X Reviewed 17 comments

AMD's "7nm" Zen 2 8-core Ryzen 7 3700X and 12-core Ryzen 9 3900X CPUs have been reviewed:

The AMD 3rd Gen Ryzen Deep Dive Review: 3700X and 3900X Raising The Bar

From the conclusion page:

In the majority of controlled tests, AMD has done something they haven't been able to achieve in almost 15 years, since the tail-end of the Athlon 64's reign in 2005: that is to have a CPU microarchitecture with higher performance per clock than Intel's leading architecture. Zen 2 finally achieves this symbolic mark by a hair's margin, with the new core improving IPC by 10-13% when compared to Zen+.

Having said that, Intel still very much holds the single-threaded performance crown by a few percent. Intel's higher achieved frequencies as well as continued larger lead in memory sensitive workloads are still goals that AMD has to work towards to, and future Zen iterations will have to further improve in order to have a shot at the ST performance crown.

[...] In the majority of our system benchmarks, AMD more often than not is able to best Intel's Core i7-9700K and i9-9900K in terms of performance. It was particularly interesting to see the new 3rd gen Ryzens post larger improvements in the web tests, all thanks to Zen 2's improved and larger op cache.

In anything that is more than lightly multi-threaded, AMD is also able to take the performance crown among mainstream desktop processors, thanks to their inclusion of 12 cores in their top SKU Ryzen 3900X. For total MT throughput, Intel can still beat this with their massive X-series HEDT chips, but these server-derrived parts are in a completely different class in both features and price, and AMD has their own Threadripper parts to rival that. All of this means that for heavily threaded scenarios, the 3900X rules the roost among true desktop processors.

[...] Perhaps the best arguments for the 3700X and 3900X is their value as well as their power efficiency. At $329 the 3700X particularly seems exciting, and gamers will want to take note that it posts the same gaming performance as the $499 3900X. Considering that AMD is also shipping the CPU with the perfectly reasonable Wrath Spire cooler, this also adds on to the value that you get if you're budget conscious.

The 3900X essentially has no real competition when it comes to the multi-threaded performance that it's able to deliver. Here the chip not only bests Intel's mainstream desktop designs, but it's able to go toe-to-toe with the lowest rung of Intel's more specialized HEDT platforms. Even AMD's own Threadripper line-up is made irrelevant below 16 cores.

Also at Tom's Hardware, Guru3D, and Wccftech.

See also: AMD Zen 2 Microarchitecture Analysis: Ryzen 3000 and EPYC Rome

Previously: AMD and Intel at Computex 2019: First Ryzen 3000-Series CPUs and Navi GPU Announced
AMD Details Three Navi GPUs and First Mainstream 16-Core CPU


Original Submission

AMD Announces 3rd-Generation Threadripper CPUs, Ryzen 9 3950X available on November 25th, and More 22 comments

AMD has announced its latest Threadripper high end desktop CPUs, along with a launch date for the Ryzen 9 3950X:

AMD is set to close out the year on a high note. As promised, the company will be delivering its latest 16-core Ryzen 9 3950X processor, built with two 7nm TSMC chiplets, to the consumer platform for $749. Not only this, but AMD today has lifted the covers on its next generation Threadripper platform, which includes Zen 2-based chiplets, a new socket, and an astounding 4x increase in CPU-to-chipset bandwidth.

Reviews of the 16-core 3950X will appear on November 14, with retail availability on November 25. The "mainstream" CPU has a 3.5 GHz base clock, 4.7 GHz single-core boost clock, and 24 PCIe 4.0 lanes. Unlike most Ryzen CPUs, the 3950X will not come with a bundled cooler, and AMD has published a list of recommended coolers instead.

All Ryzen 3000-series CPUs can now be configured to use a lower TDP using AMD's software:

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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:25AM (17 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:25AM (#854078)

    How does ryzen core performance compare to phenom core? My main rig is still a phenom 6 core box. Give me an excuse to upgrade.

    Also, any way to zap the spying engine?

    • (Score: 4, Informative) by takyon on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:39AM (13 children)

      by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:39AM (#854081) Journal

      https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comments/92tt44/ipc_comparison_30ghz_and_4_cores/ [reddit.com]

      There's a gigantic IPC increase. From Excavator to Ryzen 3000, IPC went up like 54% (Zen), 3% (Zen+), and 12-15% (Zen 2).

      You get 2 threads per core instead of 1, which may be a benefit.

      You could pick up a cheap Ryzen 1000 or Ryzen 2000 CPU + AM4 motherboard, and then have an upgrade path to Ryzen 3000 later if you want. For example, you can find [slickdeals.net] Ryzen 5 1600 for as low as $80, or bundled with a motherboard for $140. Then you can slap in a 16-core Ryzen 9 3950X after a year or two of price declines.

      Zap the spy engine by microwaving the CPU for 10 minutes at full power.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 4, Informative) by bobthecimmerian on Tuesday June 11 2019, @11:49AM (8 children)

        by bobthecimmerian (6834) on Tuesday June 11 2019, @11:49AM (#854146)

        Don't forget, you also need to change from the DDR3 on the Phenom-compatible motherboard to DDR4 for a Ryzen-compatible motherboard.

        I upgraded from an AMD FX-8320 to a Ryzen 5 2600X. CPU + motherboard + 32GB of DDR4 (I run lots of virtual machines) was about $700 US, mostly because the 2x16 DDR4 was pricey at the time of the upgrade.

        That said, outside performance-intensive games it's hard to detect a seat-of-the-pants difference from the old processor. On benchmarks the difference is enormous, and when I rip Blu Rays and convert them to H.265 it takes far less time. But I spend a good chunk of my time in a web browser and that doesn't really feel different. And my VMs are running off spinning platter hard drives, so they're not noticeably faster because 98% of the time the CPU is idle waiting for disk IO.

        Still, I don't regret the purchase. I'm in my 40s and this is much cheaper than going for a mid-life crisis Mustang or BMW or enormous pickup truck that I'll only ever use for hauling groceries.

        • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @04:38PM (7 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @04:38PM (#854250)

          "[...] and when I rip Blu Rays and convert them to H.265". God bless you!

          • (Score: 3, Informative) by bobthecimmerian on Wednesday June 12 2019, @02:12AM (3 children)

            by bobthecimmerian (6834) on Wednesday June 12 2019, @02:12AM (#854477)

            Sorry, I don't upload them. I had a family member get traced and sued by the movie studios and it made me nervous.

            • (Score: 2) by jasassin on Wednesday June 12 2019, @08:02PM (2 children)

              by jasassin (3566) <jasassin@gmail.com> on Wednesday June 12 2019, @08:02PM (#854809) Homepage Journal

              Sorry, I don't upload them. I had a family member get traced and sued by the movie studios and it made me nervous.

              What ever happened with that lawsuit? Seriously, I would love to hear all the details you can provide!

              Very interesting.

              --
              jasassin@gmail.com GPG Key ID: 0xE6462C68A9A3DB5A
              • (Score: 3, Informative) by bobthecimmerian on Thursday June 13 2019, @12:29PM (1 child)

                by bobthecimmerian (6834) on Thursday June 13 2019, @12:29PM (#855092)

                It was typical intimidation crap, they received a letter with the lawsuit information and an outrageous number because the film was downloaded through bittorrent. So technically they were being sued for redistribution because of the way bittorrent works, even though the brother didn't post the torrent himself. Then a lawyer from the company contacted them and said they could settle out of court for $1500 provided they signed an agreement not to disclose the details, including the settlement fee. They paid it.

                I suspect if they fought it in court they could have won, or at least gotten their legal fees plus penalty down to a total of less than $1500. But they figured a $1500 sure thing with no court dates was better. I didn't find out about the whole thing until a year or two later, so I had no chance to research their options before they made their decision.

                Of course I'm violating the agreement by posting about it here, but I don't even remember what the movie was and I never got the name of the law firm the publisher was using the extort people. So it's a useless disclosure.

                I figure this kind of thing is a rare occurrence, or else piracy in the US would be less common. Everyone has a giant pirated film collection or knows someone else that does. But I was spooked anyway. I thought about getting an international VPN to get around it, but I haven't bothered.

                • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 15 2019, @12:51AM

                  by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 15 2019, @12:51AM (#855830)

                  Another to avoid it is to just ignore recent releases, as the studios seem to focus their energy on busting people for recent films, especially anything still in the theater. Since there's very little that interests me coming out nowadays, that is pretty easy.

                  Of course, there's no reason they couldn't try to extort you for anything in their nearly 100 year old back catalogue, so YMMV.

          • (Score: 2) by takyon on Wednesday June 12 2019, @02:20AM (2 children)

            by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Wednesday June 12 2019, @02:20AM (#854482) Journal

            When are we gonna get AV1 support, sheeeeeit

            --
            [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
            • (Score: 2) by bobthecimmerian on Thursday June 13 2019, @12:44PM (1 child)

              by bobthecimmerian (6834) on Thursday June 13 2019, @12:44PM (#855106)

              I use a Khadas Vim 2 Android box with Kodi to stream my films to the living room TV. It has hardware-accelerated H.265 decoding. Since it's two or three years old and AV1 only came out in March 2018 I'm pretty sure it doesn't have AV1 support. That's why I went with H.265. I should rip something AV1 and try it just in case.

              H.265 also streams nicely to Android devices running version 6 or newer. Or maybe even 5, I don't remember.

              • (Score: 2) by takyon on Thursday June 13 2019, @01:37PM

                by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Thursday June 13 2019, @01:37PM (#855123) Journal

                I'm aware that absolutely nothing has AV1 hardware decode/encode support at this time.

                I think this is the latest GPU media decoder info announced (out of Intel, AMD, Nvidia, ARM, etc.):

                https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-navi-radeon_rx_5700_xt-rx_5700-details,39608.html [tomshardware.com]
                https://www.techpowerup.com/256481/amd-navi-radeon-display-engine-and-multimedia-engine-detailed [techpowerup.com]
                https://www.techpowerup.com/img/cf96IBWB2r9zYZ25.jpg [techpowerup.com]

                So AMD Navi multimedia engine decodes:

                VP9: 4K90, 8K24
                H.264: 1080p600, 4K150
                H.265: 1080p360, 4K90, 8K24

                Kind of surprising since the ARM Mali-V76 GPU [anandtech.com] with maximum 8 cores is supposed to be able to decode 8K60. That was announced last year. 8K24 is really anemic. While a lot of people don't care about 8K decoding, improvements of that level could be applicable to high-resolution+bitrate VR video. So there is a reason to keep pushing the envelope.

                But back on topic: No AV1 decode support means a hard pass from me (for any new device). I watch a lot of YouTube and you can be sure Google will be an early adopter. It will also be interesting to see how fast anime and "The Scene" rippers adopt it. It's the open and royalty free option and using it sticks it to MPEG. It's generally accepted that it will be superior to H.265/HEVC (probably somewhere between 10-30% smaller files/bitrates at same quality).

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AV1 [wikipedia.org]

                The performance goals include "a step up from VP9 and HEVC" in efficiency for a low increase in complexity. NETVC's efficiency goal is 25% improvement over HEVC. The primary complexity concern is for software decoding, since hardware support will take time to reach users. However, for WebRTC, live encoding performance is also relevant, which is Cisco's agenda: Cisco is a manufacturer of videoconferencing equipment, and their Thor contributions aim at "reasonable compression at only moderate complexity".

                Feature wise, it is specifically designed for real-time applications (especially WebRTC) and higher resolutions (wider color gamuts, higher frame rates, UHD) than typical usage scenarios of the current generation (H.264) of video formats where it is expected to achieve its biggest efficiency gains. It is therefore planned to support the color space from ITU-R Recommendation BT.2020 and up to 12 bits of precision per color component. AV1 is primarily intended for lossy encoding, although lossless compression is supported as well.

                AV1-based containers have also been proposed as a replacement for JPEG, similar to Better Portable Graphics and High Efficiency Image File Format which wrap HEVC.

                Bunch of cool stuff involved.

                --
                [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:38PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:38PM (#854285)

        Also, the old motherboards only have PCIe3 while the new boards for zen2 have PCIe4 which means super fast m2 SSDs.

      • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Tuesday June 11 2019, @11:33PM (1 child)

        by Freeman (732) on Tuesday June 11 2019, @11:33PM (#854431) Journal

        Zap the spy engine by microwaving the CPU for 10 minutes at full power.

        Sarcasm, yes? 'cause that sounds like a really bad idea.

        --
        Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
    • (Score: 2) by coolgopher on Tuesday June 11 2019, @06:59AM (1 child)

      by coolgopher (1157) on Tuesday June 11 2019, @06:59AM (#854097)

      Also, any way to zap the spying engine?

      You mean like a tool that was mentioned [soylentnews.org] just days ago?

      Disclaimer: I haven't really looked at it or used it, as I don't currently have any AMD cpus.

      • (Score: 3, Informative) by EvilSS on Tuesday June 11 2019, @01:54PM

        by EvilSS (1456) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday June 11 2019, @01:54PM (#854199)
        That tool doesn't "zap" it, it just lets you look at code extracted from UEFI firmware updates.
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:43PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:43PM (#854289)

      Don't buy new until they respect your freedom/privacy/security. At least make them wait until a given chip has been out for a year or two. Send them an email to let them know you do that for all your machines/family/customers, etc.

  • (Score: 2) by takyon on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:47AM

    by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:47AM (#854084) Journal

    AMD Ryzen 3000 APUs: Up to Vega 11, More MHz, Under $150, Coming July 7th [anandtech.com]

    May be of interest, but you can imagine a Zen 2 + Navi version being considerably better next year.

    --
    [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @09:03AM (3 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @09:03AM (#854126)

    What is nvidia up to these days? I haven't head much from them since their big lie was revealed (they said gpus being used for crypto were being used for "datacenter" then the stock cratered with crypto).

  • (Score: 2) by Rupert Pupnick on Tuesday June 11 2019, @01:11PM (4 children)

    by Rupert Pupnick (7277) on Tuesday June 11 2019, @01:11PM (#854183) Journal

    What type of chip packages? Can’t find anything in TFAs.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @02:22PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @02:22PM (#854207)

      🤦‍♀️

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Wednesday June 12 2019, @01:40AM (2 children)

      by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Wednesday June 12 2019, @01:40AM (#854467) Journal

      AMD Zen 2 Microarchitecture Analysis: Ryzen 3000 and EPYC Rome [anandtech.com]

      The Zen 2 design paradigm, compared to the first generation of Zen, has changed significantly. The new platform and core implementation is designed around small 8-core chiplets built on TSMC’s 7nm manufacturing process, and measure around 74-80 square millimeters. On these chiplets are two groups of four-cores arranged in a ‘core complex’, or CCX, which contains those four cores and a set of L3 cache – the L3 cache is doubled for Zen 2 over Zen 1.

      Each full CPU, regardless of how many chiplets it has, is paired with a central IO die through Infinity Fabric links. The IO die acts as the central hub for all off-chip communications, as it houses all the PCIe lanes for the processor, as well as memory channels, and Infinity Fabric links to other chiplets or other CPUs. The IO die for the EPYC Rome processors is built on TSMC’s 14nm process, however the consumer processor IO dies (which are smaller and contain fewer features) are built on the Global Foundries 12nm process.

      The consumer processors, known as ‘Matisse’ or Ryzen 3rd Gen or Ryzen 3000-series, will be offered with up to two chiplets for sixteen cores. AMD is launching six versions of Matisse on July 7th, from six cores to sixteen cores. The six and eight-core processors have one chiplet, while above this the parts will have two chiplets, but in all cases the IO die is the same. This means that every Zen 2 based Ryzen 3000 processor will have access to 24 PCIe 4.0 lanes and dual channel memory. Based on the announcements today, the prices will range from $199 for the Ryzen 5 3600, up to [$750] for the sixteen core

      [...] The EPYC Rome processors, built on these Zen 2 chiplets, will have up to eight of them, enabling a platform that can support up to 64 cores. As with the consumer processors, no chiplet can communicate directly with each other – each chiplet will only connect directly to the central IO die. That IO die houses links for eight memory channels, and up to 128 lanes of PCIe 4.0 connectivity.

      Is that what you wanted to know?

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
  • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:41PM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 11 2019, @05:41PM (#854286)

    does this come with 16 backdoors or only one that you have to share?

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