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posted by chromas on Monday September 09 2019, @08:40AM   Printer-friendly

The lander module from India's moon mission was located on the lunar surface on Sunday, one day after it lost contact with the space station, and efforts are underway to try to establish contact with it, the head of the nation's space agency said.

The Press Trust of India news agency cited Indian Space and Research Organization chairman K. Sivan as saying cameras from the moon mission's orbiter had located the lander. "It must have been a hard landing," PTI quoted Sivan as saying.

[...] The space agency said it lost touch with the Vikram lunar lander on Saturday as it made its final approach to the moon's south pole to deploy a rover to search for signs of water.

A successful landing would have made India just the fourth country to land a vessel on the lunar surface, and only the third to operate a robotic rover there.

The space agency said Saturday that the lander's descent was normal until 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) from the lunar surface.

Previously: Chandrayaan-2: India's Vikram Lander Presumed to Have Crashed


Original Submission

Related Stories

Chandrayaan-2: India's Vikram Lander Presumed to Have Crashed 26 comments

ISRO lose contact with Chandrayaan-2 lander during final descent

Following a historic July 22 launch on a GSLV Mk-III rocket from the east coast of India, the Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft – the robotic lander and rover, specifically – attempted a soft landing on the surface of the Moon on Friday. All was proceeding to plan until just 2km above the surface when telemetry was lost and the vehicle will have likely crashed into the lunar surface.

[...] The Vikram lander was aiming to softly touch down about 350 kilometers (218 miles) away from the South Pole-Aitken Basin rim on Friday evening. However, with all proceeding to plan, including the braking phase of the mission ahead of final descent, telemetry was lost.

[...] Although no explanation was provided, it is clear the mission has failed.

Also at NYT and India Today.

Previously: Chandrayaan-2 Updates: Lunar Orbit Insertion and Lunar Orbit Maneuver


Original Submission

India's Vikram Lander Has Been Found 17 comments

NASA (USA's National Aeronautics and Space Administration) reports that India's Vikram Lander has been Found:

The Chandrayaan 2 Vikram lander was targeted for a highland smooth plain about 600 kilometers from the south pole; unfortunately the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) lost contact with their lander shortly before the scheduled touchdown (Sept. 7 in India, Sept. 6 in the United States).  Despite the loss, getting that close to the surface was an amazing achievement. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera team released the first mosaic (acquired Sept. 17) of the site on Sept. 26 and many people have downloaded the mosaic to search for signs of Vikram. Shanmuga Subramanian contacted the LRO project with a positive identification of debris. After receiving this tip, the LROC team confirmed the identification by comparing before and after images. When the images for the first mosaic were acquired the impact point was poorly illuminated and thus not easily identifiable. Two subsequent image sequences were acquired on Oct. 14 and 15, and Nov. 11. The LROC team scoured the surrounding area in these new mosaics and found the impact site (70.8810°S,  22.7840°E, 834 m elevation) and associated debris field. The November mosaic had the best pixel scale (0.7 meter) and lighting conditions (72° incidence angle).

The debris first located by Shanmuga is about 750 meters northwest of the main crash site and was a single bright pixel identification in that first mosaic (1.3 meter pixels, 84° incidence angle). The November mosaic shows best the impact crater, ray and extensive debris field. The three largest pieces of debris are each about 2x2 pixels and cast a one pixel shadow.

See the NASA article for before/after pictures of the impact site.

Previously:
NASA Lunar Probe Will Help Search for India's Lost Moon Lander
Time is Running Out for India to Establish Contact With its Lunar Lander
India Locates Lander Lost on Final Approach to Moon
Chandrayaan-2: India's Vikram Lander Presumed to Have Crashed
Chandrayaan-2 Updates: Lunar Orbit Insertion and Lunar Orbit Maneuver
Chandrayaan-2 Launch: How to Watch First Mission to the Moon's South Pole Mon 20190722 @ 0913 UTC
Scrubbed Chandrayaan 2 Mission to Moon's South Pole to Launch on Mon July 22 0913 UTC
India's Lunar Spacecraft Launches Sunday on First-Ever Mission to Moon's South Pole
India to Launch Combined Orbiter/Lander/Rover Mission
India's Chandrayaan-2 Moon Mission Planned for 2018


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 5, Funny) by Bot on Monday September 09 2019, @09:53AM (24 children)

    by Bot (3902) on Monday September 09 2019, @09:53AM (#891608) Journal

    Sorted by inverse likelihood
    - Was hit by an asteroid (I have seen lunar lander next to asteroids in many arcades)
    - Israel did it (so that their bereshit gone to sh!t mission wasn't a lonely failure)
    - the USA did it (lest they uncover the fake moon landing conspiracy by discovering a radically different landscape)
    - the USSR or China did it (lest they become another member of the guys who can uncover the moon hoax club, of which they are duopolists)
    - aliens (get off my lawn)

    And, most likely

    - "apparently the cpu spiked all of a sudden"
    - " .. you DID disable Windows updates on the probe, did you?"
    - "uh oh"

    --
    Account abandoned.
    • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @10:47AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @10:47AM (#891617)

      You left out what's really the most likely scenario:
      Phone rings at Indian Mission Control...
      Caller: "Hello. This is Microsoft. Your computer has been hacked. We need to access your Windows machine to fix it."
      Mission Controller: "Oh no! We're about to land our probe on the moon. Make this quick, what do you want me to do?"
      [...]
      Profit! (well, sort of)

    • (Score: 5, Funny) by JoeMerchant on Monday September 09 2019, @12:09PM (4 children)

      by JoeMerchant (3937) on Monday September 09 2019, @12:09PM (#891633)

      you DID disable Windows updates on the probe, did you?

      Yes, I DID, but Microsoft changed the disable override override exception expert mode professional edition embedded version licensed user policy status registry change method, AGAIN during that last mandatory update to fix their other screwups, and they didn't tell us anywhere in their 300 pages of update change notifications.

      --
      🌻🌻 [google.com]
      • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Monday September 09 2019, @03:20PM (3 children)

        by Freeman (732) on Monday September 09 2019, @03:20PM (#891706) Journal

        Seems, Legit. I'd almost buy it, except I doubt they're using Windows. Then again, maybe I'm not cynical enough.

        --
        Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
        • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Monday September 09 2019, @03:48PM (1 child)

          by JoeMerchant (3937) on Monday September 09 2019, @03:48PM (#891722)

          I have seen Windows used in places it never should even be considered...

          --
          🌻🌻 [google.com]
          • (Score: 3, Touché) by c0lo on Monday September 09 2019, @09:39PM

            by c0lo (156) on Monday September 09 2019, @09:39PM (#891880) Journal

            Windows used in places it never should even be considered...

            Well, duh!
            That's all the places I've seen Windows.

            --
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
        • (Score: 3, Funny) by legont on Monday September 09 2019, @11:38PM

          by legont (4179) on Monday September 09 2019, @11:38PM (#891938)

          Indians, as well as Russians, use mostly Windows. See, they trust in capitalism, not in some community open "nix" or "ism".

          No, I am not joking.

          --
          "Wealth is the relentless enemy of understanding" - John Kenneth Galbraith.
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @01:44PM (17 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @01:44PM (#891676)

      Or the gravity calculations are off. Only three countries figured out a hack to account for it. They are keeping it as a trade secret.

      Explorer I was launched at 10:48 PM EST, January 31, 1958 -- from Pad 26A, at Cape Canaveral.

      [...]

      That, Explorer I’s actual trajectory, unambiguously (and most disturbingly) seemed to violate two basic laws of 20th Century Physics, immediately after launch--

      Have received NO scientific acknowledgements, prizes, or peer-reviewed discussions … even fifty years after their totally unexpected discovery ....

      So, "who" made this remarkable discovery ... and then (as the evidence will prove ...) actively participated in its subsequent, deliberate, decades-long (and still on-going) cover-up?

      Why -- none other than Wernher von Braun, himself ....

      [...]

      And that, as a result, almost 300 years of Newton's long-accepted "Law of Universal Gravitation" was, somehow, wrong ... as might be his equally unquestioned "Three Laws of Motion" ... and potentially (shudder ...), even Einstein's "General Theory of Relativity" ....

      Whatever the ultimate cause -- this was NOT going to be any "small" Scientific Revolution.

      And, that was precisely “the Problem” ….

      And the solution to "the Problem" -- as we can now demonstrate -- was a political decision, made by "someone" that night, to instigate an immediate cover-up of this entire, stunning US space discovery ... which obviously, if openly verified, would have been--

      Tthe most important result of the entire space program!

      A cover-up which (according to the evidence)--

      Is still on-going.

      [...]

      In a very real sense, Allais' stunning eclipse observations were a remarkable "ground-based version" of von Braun's equally aberrant Explorer I behavior in space; in von Braun's growing perception, the two phenomenon could only be caused by the same gravitational anomaly -- ergo, his obvious interest in Allais' continuing experiments.

      [...]

      The physics of each was identical -- a "mass" thrust vertically against the pull of Earth's gravity by an "outside" force; in Depalma's case, literally the hand of the experimeter -- throwing the two pinballs simultaneously into the air at the same speed; in the Explorer I example, von Braun's Jupiter-C rocket supplying the "outside force" -- accelerating the satellite into a trajectory fast enough and high enough to eventually "fall around the Earth" without hitting it ... the quintessential definition of a satellite orbit.

      Was it possible that von Braun had -- inadvertantly --somehow duplicated some aspect of Depalma's elegantly simple "spinning ball experiment" that night in January, 1958 ... some ~ 20 years before DePalma would, in fact, carry it out?!

      [...]

      Why does "spinning" a steel pinball, or ... rotating a one-ton, high-tech "tub" -- containing 15 solid rockets -- allow both to climb SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER against gravity ... than if they were NOT spinning!?

      [...]

      DePalma proposed, as a result of his wide-ranging rotational experiments, that "rotating masses" in general set up some kind of hitherto unrecognized "inertial field" in their vicinity (the more widely-used term for this field now, because of how it's accessed, is a "torsion field" -- because "torsion" means literally "rotation").

      [...]
      With our clear identification of Explorer I's "non-Newtonian anomalies" as being due to the rotation of the launch vehicle's solid-rocket stages, the celestial-mechanics "fix" for future US space missions -- including the Apollo Program -- was as simple as it was obvious:

      DON'T rotate!

      http://www.enterprisemission.com/Von_Braun.htm [enterprisemission.com]
      http://www.enterprisemission.com/Von_Braun2.htm [enterprisemission.com]

      • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Monday September 09 2019, @04:04PM (16 children)

        by tangomargarine (667) on Monday September 09 2019, @04:04PM (#891726)

        I'm disinclined to believe anybody who writes in such a breathless, stream-of-consciousness manner while trying to talk about scientific theories. Could do without the ellipsis and dash infatuations, too.

        --
        "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @04:40PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @04:40PM (#891739)

          Yea I wouldn't put too much stock into Richard Hoagland per se. The miscalculated orbits early in both the US and USSR space programs along with the Allias and dePalma effects seem to be actual anomalous observations though.

        • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @05:22PM (14 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @05:22PM (#891752)

          Here's a little info about Richard Hoagland [wikipedia.org], super genius [youtube.com]:

          Richard Charles Hoagland (born April 25, 1945), is an American author, and a proponent of various conspiracy theories about NASA, lost alien civilizations on the Moon and on Mars and other related topics. Hoagland has been documented to misappropriate others' professional achievements and is widely described as a conspiracy theorist and fringe pseudoscientist.

          I'd note that he's not quite as batshit crazy as Gene Ray [wikipedia.org], but that's not exactly a high bar.

          Just sayin'.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @05:46PM (12 children)

            by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @05:46PM (#891763)

            What is your point? An ad hominum attack is only useful if you are too dumb, lazy, or ignorant to understand the topic. It really doesnt take much effort to skim those pages and get his point that rotating stuff seems to move different than predicted. Then you can follow up on his sources if you are still interested.

            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @06:15PM (5 children)

              by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @06:15PM (#891775)

              My point is that Richard Hoagland is a documented thief, liar and crackpot.

              As such, anything he has to say should be taken with a dump truck full of salt.

              And by the way, when you say stuff that's actually *true* and bears upon the discussion (in this case, Hoagland's "scientific" ramblings), it isn't Ad Hominem.

              Have a wonderful day!

              • (Score: -1, Redundant) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @06:22PM (4 children)

                by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @06:22PM (#891781)

                Exactly, you are too lazy, dumb, or ignorant to judge the content for yourself.

                • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @08:44PM (3 children)

                  by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @08:44PM (#891858)

                  Exactly, you are too lazy, dumb, or ignorant to judge the content for yourself.

                  Right. That's why we teach elementary school students to formulate mathematics from first principles.

                  And why we require everyone to prove GTR and QM from first principles before allowing them to interact with gravity or quantum effects.

                  What's more, we require everyone who wishes to use magnets or anything with an electric motor to prove Maxwell's equations from first principles as well, right?

                  GTR describes the effect (due to the distortion of space-time) we call "gravity" so precisely that anyone (e.g. Hoagland or you) who claims it's wrong is obviously dumb, ignorant, intentionally dishonest and/or a nutter. Which one are you?

                  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @10:23PM (2 children)

                    by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @10:23PM (#891908)

                    GTR describes the effect (due to the distortion of space-time) we call "gravity" so precisely

                    Did you miss the supposed 95% of the universe made solely of invisible stuff required for GTR to get the right answer? Stuff that after spending tens to hundreds of billions of dollars looking is still only detectable as deviations from what GTR predicts?

                    Einsteins model works fine for the solar system but fell apart as soon as people started observing other galaxies.

                    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 10 2019, @08:00AM (1 child)

                      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 10 2019, @08:00AM (#892123)

                      Then what alternative do you propose and how does it explain the cosmic background radiation's anisotropy?

                      • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Tuesday September 10 2019, @03:47PM

                        by tangomargarine (667) on Tuesday September 10 2019, @03:47PM (#892247)

                        Apparently MOND [wikipedia.org] has done a fairly good job explaining some things.

                        Obviously it still has some problems, but then again so does dark matter.

                        --
                        "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
            • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Monday September 09 2019, @06:40PM (3 children)

              by tangomargarine (667) on Monday September 09 2019, @06:40PM (#891799)

              It really doesnt take much effort to skim those pages

              Are you kidding me? This one is like 20 pages of text, and there's a second page after this.

              Not to mention the writing style is enough to give you a massive headache trying to read it.

              --
              "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
              • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @06:53PM (2 children)

                by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @06:53PM (#891812)

                I do agree that Hoagland is a crackpot. All you have to do is watch one of his presentations where he plays with lunar photos in photoshop until image artifacts show up to see that.

                However, I disagree that you can dismiss all the claims of anomalous (relative to Newtonian/Eisensteinian physics) gravitational forces that people have reported.

                http://www-pw.physics.uiowa.edu/van90/ExplorerSatellites_LudwigOct2004.pdf [uiowa.edu]
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allais_effect [wikipedia.org]
                https://brucedepalma.com/ [brucedepalma.com]
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galaxy_rotation_curve [wikipedia.org]

                • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Monday September 09 2019, @07:39PM (1 child)

                  by tangomargarine (667) on Monday September 09 2019, @07:39PM (#891839)

                  Oh, I'm sure there are still plenty of things our science still has wrong/doesn't know about astronomy. I just question this guy's assertion that NASA does know, and is purposely covering up science because...some sort of conspiracy theory that Russia is in on as well. And is somehow still a secret with not one but two separate national governments involved.

                  And a lot of astronomy, it's not actually that hard for a random scientist with access to the right sort of telescope to make readings of whatever-it-is himself.

                  --
                  "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
                  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @07:51PM

                    by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @07:51PM (#891845)

                    There are plenty of reports of anomolous readings. They all get dismissed as "dark matter".

            • (Score: 2) by PartTimeZombie on Monday September 09 2019, @10:59PM (1 child)

              by PartTimeZombie (4827) on Monday September 09 2019, @10:59PM (#891927)

              What is your point? An ad hominum attack is only useful if you are too dumb, lazy, or ignorant to understand the topic.

              The failure to believe any of the nonsense you linked to is entirely rational.

              Also, posting A/C makes you even less credible.

              • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 10 2019, @02:24AM

                by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 10 2019, @02:24AM (#892016)

                Well I guess you just wait for your betters to tell you what to think then, and therefore always be behind the curve.

          • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Monday September 09 2019, @06:43PM

            by tangomargarine (667) on Monday September 09 2019, @06:43PM (#891803)

            Hoagland has no education beyond the high school level. According to Hoagland's own curriculum vitae[2] he has no advanced training, schooling or degrees in any scientific field.

            Oh, so he's like the Eliezer Yudkowski of astronomy? Autodidacts are so much fun.

            It's not like rocket science is one of the most complicated professions in the world; I'm sure I can just wing this with no real training

            --
            "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
  • (Score: 2) by KritonK on Monday September 09 2019, @10:14AM (9 children)

    by KritonK (465) on Monday September 09 2019, @10:14AM (#891612)

    A successful landing would have made India just the fourth country to land a vessel on the lunar surface

    But they did land a vessel:

    "It must have been a hard landing"

    A hard landing is still a landing and, if they manage to establish contact with the lander module and get even a beep from it, one might even call it a successful one, even if the mission is scrapped.

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Runaway1956 on Monday September 09 2019, @11:23AM (4 children)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Monday September 09 2019, @11:23AM (#891622) Homepage Journal

      Any landing you can walk away from, right? Oh, wait - no one walked away.

      --
      Through a Glass, Darkly -George Patton
      • (Score: 1) by nitehawk214 on Monday September 09 2019, @01:45PM (2 children)

        by nitehawk214 (1304) on Monday September 09 2019, @01:45PM (#891677)

        Did it have a rover? Does it still count if something rolls away?

        --
        "Don't you ever miss the days when you used to be nostalgic?" -Loiosh
        • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Monday September 09 2019, @01:52PM (1 child)

          by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Monday September 09 2019, @01:52PM (#891679) Homepage Journal

          I'm not real sure. People who are rolled away from a hard landing are generally headed to the hospital or the morgue. We'll need an AI to decide how the lander counts. ;^)

          --
          Through a Glass, Darkly -George Patton
          • (Score: 1) by nitehawk214 on Monday September 09 2019, @07:13PM

            by nitehawk214 (1304) on Monday September 09 2019, @07:13PM (#891823)

            I guess it brings to meaning to the term "heads will roll". Perhaps we can say "CPUs will roll".

            --
            "Don't you ever miss the days when you used to be nostalgic?" -Loiosh
      • (Score: 2) by KritonK on Monday September 09 2019, @04:13PM

        by KritonK (465) on Monday September 09 2019, @04:13PM (#891732)

        Actually, all the module's passengers walked away!

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Monday September 09 2019, @01:00PM (3 children)

      by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Monday September 09 2019, @01:00PM (#891656) Journal

      Who will nab the prestigious title of "first country to nuke the Moon"?

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
  • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @05:43PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 09 2019, @05:43PM (#891758)
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