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posted by Fnord666 on Wednesday February 19 2020, @10:37AM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the you-have-only-3-months-to-migrate-off dept.

Red Hat tips its Fedora at CoreOS Container Linux stans: Hop onto something else, folks, cos this one's on a boat to Valhalla:

Red Hat is set to fling a flaming arrow at Red Hat CoreOS Container Linux*, the software firm said as it laid out the details of the end of life timeline for the distro it acquired in January 2018.

[...] Users who want something similar outside the context of OpenShift are directed to Fedora CoreOS, the community version, which is "the official successor to CoreOS Container Linux," according to the end of life announcement. That said, Red Hat has admitted: "Fedora CoreOS cannot currently replace Container Linux for all use cases."

[...] The team said: "We've found that the incremental, exploratory, forward-looking development required for Fedora CoreOS — which is also a cornerstone of the Fedora Project as a whole — is difficult to reconcile with the iron-clad stability guarantee that ideally exists when automatically updating systems."

Red Hat noted there is a fork of CoreOS Container Linux called Flatcar Linux which may be more suitable for users who do not want to jump into OpenShift. Flatcar Linux is supported by a Berlin company called Kinvolk.

The end of life timeline for CoreOS Container Linux is aggressive, Red Hat said. May 26 is the last date for updates including security patches. From September 1st, "published resources related to CoreOS Container Linux will be deleted or made read-only. OS downloads will be removed, CoreUpdate servers will be shut down, and OS images will be removed from AWS, Azure, and Google Compute Engine. GitHub repositories, including the issue tracker, will become read-only." The reason for deleting OS images is to discourage continued use after end of support.


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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19 2020, @12:26PM (6 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19 2020, @12:26PM (#959842)

    Historical moment: this is the first distribution to be killed by systemd... the others will follow.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19 2020, @01:19PM (4 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19 2020, @01:19PM (#959846)

      errr... have you not seen Ubuntu?

      • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19 2020, @03:01PM (3 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 19 2020, @03:01PM (#959865)

        Yes. And systemd broke Ubuntu as well.

        • (Score: 2, Disagree) by PartTimeZombie on Wednesday February 19 2020, @08:26PM (2 children)

          by PartTimeZombie (4827) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday February 19 2020, @08:26PM (#959990)

          The "systemd is bad" crap is getting old. Stop it.

          You are not being edgy or insightful.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2020, @01:29AM

            by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 20 2020, @01:29AM (#960115)

            I'm sure it's nothing edgy-insightfuld can't handle.

          • (Score: 2) by Bot on Thursday February 20 2020, @09:50PM

            by Bot (3902) on Thursday February 20 2020, @09:50PM (#960461) Journal

            >The "systemd is bad" crap is getting old. Stop it.

            kill 1? not recommended.

            --
            Account abandoned.
    • (Score: 4, Touché) by DannyB on Wednesday February 19 2020, @03:00PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday February 19 2020, @03:00PM (#959864) Journal

      Historical moment [ . . . ] the first distribution to be killed by systemd.

      Wouldn't that make it a Hysterical moment?

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  • (Score: 4, Informative) by DannyB on Wednesday February 19 2020, @02:59PM (3 children)

    by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday February 19 2020, @02:59PM (#959863) Journal

    Virtual machines.

    Para-virtualization. (More efficient VMs.)

    Anyone here remember "linux on linux"? (Kernel "ported" to the form of a user space executable. You chroot, then execute this kernel, it starts up with its own processes, memory, etc. IO is mapped into kernel calls to the kernel it is running on. It launches whatever /sbin/init is visible within the chroot.)

    Hypervisors designed to only run Linux bootable images. (More lightweight than a normal VM.)

    Docker. (Static Linking for Millennials!) (Another way to have the appearance of a full Linux kernel all to yourself without the weight of a VM. Basically the cost of launching an executable. The benefits of a standard packaging format, build tools and images built upon simpler images.)

    LXC/LXD (and other similar containerization / packaging systems)

    Kubernetes. (Built upon Docker to create scalable clusters.)

    Library OSes, or Unikernels [wikipedia.org] (A lightweight OS, such as OSv [osv.io], bootable only on a VM, but not real hardware. This OS is statically linked with its workload to form a bootable image, eg, VHD file. OSv, for example, provides most of a Linux kernel set of user space calls -- except for the ability to fork.)

    I find the "Library OS" or "Unikernel" approach most ironic. It takes us all the way back to managing workloads as virtual machines again. Eg, you might use Virtual Box, for example, to manage workloads. Each workload is an extremely lightweight bootable VM. Where a VM's VHD might be many GB with an OS installed, OSv is linked with, say, a hundred megabyte Java workload, forming a bootable image that is only a hundred megabytes -- small by VM disk image standards. It never forks (because forking is not supported), but under Java (and some other statically linked languages used with OSv) you can run all the threads you want. Java in fact almost is an abstract OS, providing a portable version of most things you expect of an OS.

    What will be next?

    --
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    • (Score: 2) by meustrus on Wednesday February 19 2020, @07:42PM (2 children)

      by meustrus (4961) on Wednesday February 19 2020, @07:42PM (#959975)

      What will be next?

      WebAssembly. Standardized APIs, implemented by multiple vendors, runnable in sandboxes on arbitrary hardware.

      It's basically the dream of the Java Virtual Machine, except that everybody already has a web browser capable of running it, and you don't have to write your program in a different language to use it.

      --
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      • (Score: 2) by Bot on Thursday February 20 2020, @09:47PM (1 child)

        by Bot (3902) on Thursday February 20 2020, @09:47PM (#960460) Journal

        >except that everybody already has a web browser capable of running it

        But, expanding web browser capabilities up to the needs of javascript frameworks for the desktop is going to hurt the already scarce web browsers offer. Hackers and crackers will be very very happy to return to the day of windows monoculture, instead of the nightmarish "muslc? WTF is this oh man" exploration of the random Linux box.

        I guess we will end up with Chrome, Safari, Exploder, and systemd-browserd (for linux, basically the usual web renderer and js engine, plus code which won't let anything else on the system mess with port 80 and 443).

        --
        Account abandoned.
        • (Score: 2) by meustrus on Thursday February 20 2020, @10:49PM

          by meustrus (4961) on Thursday February 20 2020, @10:49PM (#960472)

          "Am I nothing to you???" - Mozilla Firefox and clones

          Seriously though, WebAssembly is far from a monoculture. The programming APIs may be the same, but much like Linux/Solaris/BSD all implement(ed) POSIX differently (and with different bugs), different browsers implement WebAssembly differently.

          "Browser" being understood in the sense of the "browser" on a Chromebook, i.e. it may as well be the entire user surface at that point.

          --
          If there isn't at least one reference or primary source, it's not +1 Informative. Maybe the underused +1 Interesting?
  • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Wednesday February 19 2020, @03:15PM

    by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday February 19 2020, @03:15PM (#959870) Journal

    Has anyone tried Rancher OS instead of Core OS?

    I have dabbled and experimented a bit with Docker, Kubernetes, and thus a bit of Rancher OS. Haven't tried Core OS.

    Since Apache Tomcat can be run in a clustered mode, I have considered that, if there ever were such a need, I could run multiple Tomcats across multiple machines in a cluster. (Even without the need for greater scale, this could also provide a hot failover redundancy.) While a couple or several Tomcats could be managed by simply setting up several VMs, I thought the idea of Docker packaging and playing with Kubernetes might be interesting. Then, on a suitably equipped Kubernetes cluster, you have the potential to not only scale up to a handful of instances, but to dozens or hundreds. Not that I have such a need.

    I've got more than the scale I need right now by just throwing bigger hardware at it.

    If I ever had to cluster the Tomcat servers, then I probably might need a clustered SQL database as well. If my app grows to where this is needed, I'll be delighted.

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  • (Score: 1) by Snort on Wednesday February 19 2020, @07:22PM (1 child)

    by Snort (5141) on Wednesday February 19 2020, @07:22PM (#959969)

    RedHat Atomic
    replaced by
    CoreOS
    replaced by...
    ???

    • (Score: 2) by arslan on Wednesday February 19 2020, @11:09PM

      by arslan (3462) on Wednesday February 19 2020, @11:09PM (#960067)

      Now that IBM owns Redhat, who knows maybe AIX? Heck maybe Powerlinux will make a comeback!

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