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posted by Fnord666 on Thursday January 14 2021, @03:18PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the I-see-what-you-did-there dept.

Intel Rocket Lake Desktop CPUs Will Launch in March, Gigabyte Confirms - ExtremeTech:

Gigabyte has confirmed that Intel will launch its Rocket Lake CPU refresh in March, as part of an announcement touting its own PCIe 4.0 support. Gigabyte announced today that if you own a Z490 motherboard, you'll be getting a UEFI update to support Rocket Lake CPUs with full PCIe 4.0 support.

The rest of the PR goes into detail on how Gigabyte engineered their motherboards to handle the higher heat output of PCIe 4.0, and the fact that addressable BAR support is coming to the company's motherboards as well. Addressable BAR is the same feature AMD debuted as Smart Access Memory earlier this year.

The March 2021 date confirms what we've heard previously — late March is more likely than early March. It's going to be genuinely interesting to see how Cypress Cove performs against AMD's Zen 3. Generally speaking, based on leaked benchmarks and early data, we're looking at impressive gains for Intel in single-thread performance. Multi-thread performance estimates for the Core i9-11900K have varied. In some cases, the 11900K is almost a match for the 10-core Core i9-10900K. In a few leaked results, it's actually been faster on eight cores than Comet Lake was on 10.

Are any of my fellow Soylentils doing PC builds right now, and if so what are you building? Let us know in the comments!

takyon writes: Intel announced more details about Rocket Lake at CES 2021. While dropping the top core count from 10 to 8, Intel estimates a 19% IPC increase for Rocket Lake-S. It also adds AVX-512 and "Deep Learning Boost" support. The integrated graphics should be about 50% faster, and can be used for stream encoding while discrete graphics is being used for gaming. AV1 video decode is supported. New Z590, B560, and H510 motherboards will support both Rocket Lake and Comet Lake. Intel's comparison of the 8-core i9-11900K to AMD's 12-core Ryzen 9 5900X shows the former performing 2-8% faster at several games at 1080p.

Also at Tom's Hardware and Wccftech.


Original Submission

Related Stories

AnandTech Reviews Intel's i7-11700K "Rocket Lake" CPU Early 14 comments

Intel's next-generation "Rocket Lake" CPUs will be some of Intel's last desktop models on a "14nm" node, and include "backported" Willow Cove cores (referred to as "Cypress Cove") from "10nm" Tiger Lake mobile CPUs, with improved instructions per clock. Notably, the lineup only goes up to 8 cores, instead of 10 cores for the previous Core i9. The review embargo ends on the launch date, March 30th, but some retailers have been selling the CPUs early. AnandTech obtained an 8-core i7-11700K and wrote a review of it. The results were not great.

Power consumption of the 125 W TDP chip peaked at 224.56 W when running an AVX2 workload, compared to 204.79 W for its i7-10700K "Comet Lake" predecessor and 141.45 W for AMD's Ryzen 7 5800X. The i7-11700K reached 291.68 W with an AVX-512 workload.

The i7-11700K not only failed to beat the 5800X in many benchmarks, but trailed the previous-gen i7-10700K in some cases. The major exception is performance in AVX-512 workloads. Gaming performance of the i7-11700K was particularly bad, in part due to an increase in L3 cache and core-to-core latency.

It's possible that there will be some improvements from a final microcode update before launch. There's also models like the Core i9-11900K, which have the same 8 cores but can clock up to 300 MHz higher.

See also: Intel Core i7-11700K 8 Core Rocket Lake CPU Review Published By Anandtech – Very Hot, Consumes More Power Than Core i9-10900K & Slower Than AMD In Core-To-Core Tests

Related: Linus Torvalds: Don't Hide Rust in Linux Kernel; Death to AVX-512
Former Intel Principal Engineer Blasts the Company
Gigabyte Confirms Intel Rocket Lake Desktop CPUs Will Launch in March


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:15PM (3 children)

    by Freeman (732) on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:15PM (#1100127) Journal

    Hi hopped on the AMD Ryzen 5 3600 bandwagon when it was still being sold for $179.99 on Newegg. Now it's $20 more expensive and is supposedly on sale at that price point as well.

    Right now, I'm waiting for my ASUS Motherboard to be repaired and returned to me. At first I thought the GPU was shot, so I swapped it to an old one. Then, I decided to try and swap it to a different GPU and MB wouldn't boot. Kept showing VGA light on, no matter what I did.

    Case: Fractal Design, ATX Mid Tower, pretty solid case.
    PSU: Seasonic 750W 80+ Platinum
    Case Fans: Fractal Design Fans, Quiet, not flashy, but look good.
    Motherboard: ASUS TUF Gaming x570 Wifi Plus
    CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600
    RAM: G-Skill 2x16GB 3600Mhz
    NVMe SSD: Silicon Power 1TB, Max Read up to 2200 Mbps, Max Write up to 1600 Mbps, MTBF 2,000,000 hours.
    GPU: (Got a GTX 1650 as a stop-gap between now and whenever I can get a new AMD GPU. Noticed their Geforce Experience wanted me to sign-in to use it. Said screw that and stole my old RX480 back from my wife's computer. Then it appeared to die, but didn't actually. Was Motherboard problems. So, now the whole computer is on the floor and the RX480 is back in the Wife's computer, because it's still functional. Am making due with an old Quad-Core (I believe an AMD Phenom x2 640) computer with 8GB RAM, 512GB SSD, and that GTX1650. Was using a Radeon HD 6670 https://www.newegg.com/sapphire-radeon-hd-6670-100326ul/p/N82E16814102950 [newegg.com], but swapped it for the GTX to see, if it would help the game I was playing. Then installed NZXT CAM to see what my problem actually was. The main slowdown for me was likely the CPU, not the GPU as I'm hitting 100% CPU load, with only 25% GPU load. Game I was testing is Avorion.)
    OS: Windows 10 Professional

    https://www.newegg.com/black-fractal-design-focus-g-atx-mid-tower/p/N82E16811352069 [newegg.com]
    https://www.newegg.com/seasonic-focus-plus-750-platinum-ssr-750px-750w/p/N82E16817151191 [newegg.com]
    https://www.newegg.com/fractal-design-fd-fan-ssr3-140-wt-case-fan/p/N82E16835352016 [newegg.com]
    https://www.newegg.com/asus-tuf-gaming-x570-plus/p/N82E16813119197 [newegg.com]
    https://www.newegg.com/amd-ryzen-5-3600/p/N82E16819113569 [newegg.com]
    https://www.newegg.com/g-skill-32gb-288-pin-ddr4-sdram/p/N82E16820232867 [newegg.com]
    https://www.newegg.com/silicon-power-p34a60-1tb/p/N82E16820301428 [newegg.com]
    https://www.newegg.com/gigabyte-geforce-gtx-1650-gv-n1650oc-4gd/p/N82E16814932150 [newegg.com] (Was $159.99 when I got it. Now it's $400+.)

    --
    Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
    • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:37PM

      by Freeman (732) on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:37PM (#1100136) Journal

      My reasoning was that I could hopefully upgrade to a 5XXX CPU sometime in 2021 and upgrade my wife's 1700 to the 3600, since the 3600 is slightly better overall. Also, wanted to upgrade to 5XXX or 6XXX GPU, but there's not been a good time for me to get one. Mostly due to Bitcoin Miners and/or Scalpers and/or high gamer demand.

      --
      Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
    • (Score: 4, Insightful) by jasassin on Friday January 15 2021, @12:32AM (1 child)

      by jasassin (3566) <jasassin@gmail.com> on Friday January 15 2021, @12:32AM (#1100277) Journal

      Noticed their Geforce Experience wanted me to sign-in to use it. Said screw that

       

      I got a 1650 Super and that login bullshit to use the GeForce Experience software really irked me. I wonder what the reasoning behind that is? More data mining after I buy your hardware NVIDIA? Fuck you!

      --
      jasassin@gmail.com Key fingerprint = 0644 173D 8EED AB73 C2A6 B363 8A70 579B B6A7 02CA
      • (Score: 3, Informative) by Freeman on Friday January 15 2021, @03:55PM

        by Freeman (732) on Friday January 15 2021, @03:55PM (#1100582) Journal

        It has to be exactly that. AMD doesn't require a user login to fully use the expensive hardware you just purchased.

        Even NZXT CAM which I've found to be a useful tool for monitoring in-game CPU/GPU/RAM usage and temperatures doesn't require a login. They have a "continue as guest" option. I don't use it all the time, but it's useful to see what's holding you back or to make sure your GPU/CPU temps are within normal ranges.

        --
        Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
  • (Score: 2) by zoward on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:26PM (7 children)

    by zoward (4734) Subscriber Badge on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:26PM (#1100130)

    Oh, I'm definitelty in the maket to build a new desktop PC using the Ryzen 5xxx series processor and motherboard. Can someone let me know when I'll be able to buy one without paying scalper's prices on eBay?

    • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:28PM

      by Freeman (732) on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:28PM (#1100132) Journal

      Sometime next year, if Bitcoin takes another nosedive.

      --
      Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
    • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:34PM (4 children)

      by Freeman (732) on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:34PM (#1100133) Journal

      At this point, I'd build something you could upgrade to the 5XXX series later. Actually, at this point, I'd try to hang on to my old junk as long as possible. At least until prices have started to swing back in the consumer's favor.

      5XXX CPUs, 5XXX GPUs, and 6XXX GPUs, can't be had except via scalper prices. Even decent GPUs have skyrocketed in price since I built my machine last August. The GTX1650 GPU I bought at $159.99 is now going for over $440 via a 3rd party, apparently due to Newegg being out of stock.

      Now is not the time to buy. Now is the time use duct tape to make it hold together, until you can get reasonably priced parts to build a new machine.

      --
      Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
      • (Score: 3, Interesting) by zoward on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:45PM

        by zoward (4734) Subscriber Badge on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:45PM (#1100141)

        That pretty much describes my 6th gen i3 desktop at this point. Duct tape, bailing wire, Devuan.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 14 2021, @07:18PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 14 2021, @07:18PM (#1100173)

        Consider just getting a high end Westmere/Phenom II or other early generation cpu/motherboard. As long as you're running dual/triple channel memory and a modern high end GPU, most of them work pretty well for the majority of games, and the few games that have 'missing instruction' bullshit, you can usually run with Intel's cpu instruction emulator, and maybe an overclock if you have a well binned chip.

        As an added bonus you will have fewer serial numbers for your favorite operating system manufacturer, steam, or your gaming company to steal from you, and make it harder for them to spy on you and exploit your system. Many modern multiplayer games even have RAT capabilities built in so they can view your screen remotely. (Notably anything from what used to be Cryptic/Arcgames.)

        It's a Brave New World comrade. One that would quickly end any of the old Science Fiction Dystopian stories we read, because much like 1984, they knew what you were doing all along.

        • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Thursday January 14 2021, @11:14PM

          by Freeman (732) on Thursday January 14 2021, @11:14PM (#1100248) Journal

          I'm currently running a Phenom/Athlon II x4 640 (I think, something very close to it anyway.) and I'm running into CPU performance issues. Avorion is making my CPU hit that 100% wall and just keep going. I tried tweaking a few things in the BIOS and it seems to have helped slightly, but I'm likely just reducing the life of the CPU at this point. Looking at better FM2+ socket CPUs, there's a negligible difference in performance according to userbenchmark.com. So, I was like, how cheap could I get a used AM3 MB+CPU+RAM and I'm thinking, yeah, that's dumb. Especially since this thing isn't my main computer and apparently my fixed ASUS motherboard should be arriving today.

          Still, a Phenom II or even better yet, a FX6300/8300 would definitely get someone by for a few more years.

          --
          Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
      • (Score: 2) by jasassin on Friday January 15 2021, @01:18AM

        by jasassin (3566) <jasassin@gmail.com> on Friday January 15 2021, @01:18AM (#1100293) Journal

        The GTX1650 GPU I bought at $159.99 is now going for over $440

        I can confirm that. The 1650 Super [amazon.com] I bought from Amazon for $164.99 is now going for $388.99!

        Now is not the time to buy. Now is the time use duct tape to make it hold together, until you can get reasonably priced parts to build a new machine.

        Listen to this guy, he knows what he's talking about. Now is the worst time to build a new computer, or even upgrade your GPU. Wait until you can get parts at MSRP and let the scalpers sit on a pile of outdated parts.

        --
        jasassin@gmail.com Key fingerprint = 0644 173D 8EED AB73 C2A6 B363 8A70 579B B6A7 02CA
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 14 2021, @06:21PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 14 2021, @06:21PM (#1100148)

      My Micro Center is showing 25+ 5600X, all the others sold out.

      Rocket Lake could alleviate the pressure by April.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:27PM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:27PM (#1100131)

    a MB with dual nics and integrated CPU for my next build, but I've not seen anything like that out there recently. Anybody know a vendor selling new boards like that? I don't need a lot of horsepower, but I don't want to have to run a managed switch to get layer 2 separation.

    Thanks!

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 14 2021, @10:45PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 14 2021, @10:45PM (#1100238)

      i'd say cloud router from mikrotik.

      They have some, with fiber sockets and stuff.

      I mean, if you want fiber instead of ethernet at home and somewhat more integrated experience then DIY pf or whatever firewall box.

      If its not acceptable, id say any random motherboard with 8 gb ram and two pcie slots can be made into what you want.

      Usually people buy cheap, passive cooled crap like these:

      https://yandex.ru/images/touch/search?text=alibaba%20x86%20dual%20nic&redircnt=1610664155.1 [yandex.ru]

      but majority of those are intel, and nics are also intel.

      Id say stay the fuck away from intel.

      Unless this is non opsec critical device to be used for stuff noone cares about, then sure why not.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 15 2021, @06:40PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 15 2021, @06:40PM (#1100708)

      Epyc 3000?

      Supermicro M11SDV-8C-LN4F AMD EPYC 3251 8-Core Embedded Mini ITX Motherboard w/ Quad GbE LAN, IPMI - Newegg [newegg.com]

              AMD EPYC 3251 2.5 - 3.1 GHz 8-Core Processor
              Supports up to 512GB ECC RDIMM Memory
              4 x Intel GbE LAN and a Dedicated IPMI
              PCI-E 3.0 x16 slot, M.2 PCI-E 3.0 x4 slot
              Mini ITX Form Factor: 170 x 170mm, 6.7" x 6.7" (in inches)

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by fakefuck39 on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:38PM (1 child)

    by fakefuck39 (6620) on Thursday January 14 2021, @05:38PM (#1100137)

    I wonder why more applications don't use both graphics cards - the discrete GPU for the actual graphics, and the integrated one for some kind of vector computation. Nvidia has that Physx thing, and dx12 supports using two different brand cards at the same time. But I don't see any actual applications using this.

    Since I'm not a gamer, here's a good example: business meetings. I'm on a conference call with 20 people, seeing 20 streams, sending my own. There's compression, decompression, noise reduction for audio, etc. I'm also running a computationally intensive script in the background and drawing up a visio with high-res graphics files. It's all using the same GPU and CPU, the integrated graphics card is idle. Why isn't "the computer" offloading some of that work onto the crappy intel card in my laptop, resulting in faster less jittery experience for my visio usage? I'm sure that underpowered GPU can handle at least encoding and decoding the video in my webex meeting, and because this is not exactly a memory-bandwidth restricted process, there shouldn't be a bandwidth bottleneck between the two cards.

    I think the reason this isn't done, is the way dx12 has it set up, it's still up to the application to handle this. What we need is kind of like the thread model in Solaris - you get a bunch of user threads, and they're mapped to real threads by the OS. We do it for CPU, I don't see why not for GPU. If it's left up to each application, it's probably not happening.

    • (Score: 2) by hendrikboom on Sunday January 17 2021, @04:37AM

      by hendrikboom (1125) on Sunday January 17 2021, @04:37AM (#1101389) Homepage Journal

      I think the hardware initialisation is such that it configures itself to make only one video card available so that the poor OS that it's about to boot doesn't get confused.

      -- hendrik

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Azuma Hazuki on Friday January 15 2021, @01:27AM (10 children)

    by Azuma Hazuki (5086) on Friday January 15 2021, @01:27AM (#1100297) Journal

    I'm all about laptops and love my Thinkpad, but someday when life settles down and I'm somewhere safe I'll build a desktop PC. I really like the Fractal Node 202 case and would love to build with the highest-performing 65W Zen4/5 CPU when they come out in it. Mini ITX, Noctua low-profile cooler, one big NVMe SSD, and a single low-profile GPU just for display duty. Basically make it small and cute, but still powerful :)

    --
    I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by takyon on Friday January 15 2021, @02:23AM (2 children)

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Friday January 15 2021, @02:23AM (#1100322) Journal

      I want to do the same thing, pretty much 100%.

      1. Laptops are great but managing the battery can be a hassle. And you can have a wimpy laptop connect to a beefy desktop remotely to get more performance.

      2. It seems like the smaller cases tend to forgo the tempered glass bullshit. Case in point, this: https://slickdeals.net/f/14768968 [slickdeals.net] All metal, please. I don't need to marvel at RGB LEDs or steampunk cable management or whatever.

      3. From what I've gathered from the rumor mill, Zen 4 will have at least a 50% core count uplift, i.e. 24-core mainstream Ryzen (I've heard 32 cores is possible but it seems unlikely). It could also have an RDNA 3 graphics chiplet (would probably also be used for "Computer Vision and Machine Learning" (CVML) acceleration as seen on leaked roadmaps). So some number of 8-core or 12-core chiplets, a graphics chiplet, and an I/O die. Then they will put 1 GB or more of L4 cache stacked on top of the I/O die. I would consider getting a higher core count chip just to get more L4 cache, if they decide to segment it that way. If some of this stuff doesn't appear on Zen 4, it should be on Zen 5. There will be an easy upgrade path where you could get one of the lower core count Zen 4 CPUs and swap it out for the highest core count Zen 5.

      4. I would probably TDP-down the chip to 65 Watts or even 35 Watts if it wasn't there already. I'm used to potato performance, so I'd rather boost efficiency and system longevity, while lowering any fan noise.

      5. I would use integrated graphics, assuming that is included on Zen 4/5, and then add a 75 Watt RDNA 4/5/6/whatever GPU years later. Or maybe an Intel discrete GPU. I don't care about gaming enough to blow 3x $$$ on a GPU that uses 4x the power.

      The only downside I see is that the smaller form factors tend to have less DIMM slots (2 instead of 4). This could become more important with DDR5, which apparently supports 2 memory channels per module [rambus.com]. We need to understand the implications of this (and the effectiveness of DDR5 on-die ECC [semiengineering.com]) before making any decisions. We need to know more (or anything) about the AM5 socket.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Friday January 15 2021, @04:03PM (1 child)

        by Freeman (732) on Friday January 15 2021, @04:03PM (#1100585) Journal

        You've not looked at enough cases, then. https://www.newegg.com/white-in-win-a1-plus-mini-itx-tower/p/2AM-001H-001M2 [newegg.com]

        Though, there is this kind of thing too: https://www.newegg.com/asrock-deskmini-x300w/p/N82E16856158068 [newegg.com] (Tiny, all metal, about the size of a regular PSU.) Limited to APUs, but could stick one of these in it: https://www.newegg.com/p/1FR-0001-000N0 [newegg.com] (Ryzen 7 PRO 4750g, capable of playing fairly recent games on low to medium settings at 1080p.) For under $1k should be able to put together a very nice, very tiny computer. Just don't expect it to be a serious gaming machine. It might be okay for some VR games, but I'd guess the experience would leave something to be desired.

        --
        Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
        • (Score: 2) by takyon on Friday January 15 2021, @05:02PM

          by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Friday January 15 2021, @05:02PM (#1100627) Journal

          I'm not in the market for a while, so I don't really look at a lot of cases. But what I do notice is a lot of tempered glass, especially on full towers.

          There are rumors that AMD will start including graphics across the whole desktop CPU lineup (which would make them all APUs, but chiplet-based instead of monolithic with lower core counts like Renoir 4750G). For example, Zen 4 + RDNA 3. I think the decision to not include graphics on the original Zen CPUs was so that AMD could focus on CPU performance and core counts while keeping costs low. Today, the chiplet approach offers some flexibility, CPU and graphics cores will be tiny on TSMC's "5nm" node, and there is a need for an iGPU that can also be used for machine learning acceleration (every new pre-built system will be advertised as having this capability in the near future).

          I would rather get something that can fit a graphics card (maybe low profile), but aim for the case to be smaller. I might even get a standard ATX motherboard, depending on the memory situation.

          VR gaming will not be much less demanding in the long run, unless foveated rendering lowers the performance needed dramatically. VR gaming will be a major driver of resolution and frame rates. 8K gaming is a meme unless you strap it to your face.

          --
          [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
    • (Score: 2) by digitalaudiorock on Friday January 15 2021, @09:12PM (4 children)

      by digitalaudiorock (688) on Friday January 15 2021, @09:12PM (#1100823)

      I actually just got done building my first new PC in longer than you'd believe...not small and cute ;). Went with a Fractal Design Meshify C case, an AMD RYZEN 7 3700X 8-Core CPU, an ASRock X570 PHANTOM GAMING 4 motherboard, 64 GB of RAM, a Radeon RX 5500 XT 8-GB GPU. I'm one of those who just can't totally warm up to the limited lifetime of SSD (even though I know they'd actually last a long time) and went with a ton of SATA disk. Installed Gentoo with everything I need compiled into the kernel (no modules). Everything about it is insanely fast (with the possible exception of the lifeform behind the keyboard :D)..I'm like a kid at Christmas. Gentoo compiles are of no consequence at all with 8 cores x 2 threads per core...builds my kernel from scratch in 1 minute 13 seconds. Loving everything about this. Sprung for a 32" LG 4K monitor to celebrate.

      • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Tuesday January 19 2021, @04:43PM (3 children)

        by Freeman (732) on Tuesday January 19 2021, @04:43PM (#1102447) Journal

        I would highly recommend an SSD, but with a HDD as a Storage drive. You can generally, easily re-install programs, if necessary. For everyday activity, an SSD is super awesome. You don't trust SSD, that's just fine. Just think of it as non-volatile RAM that you use for your OS and programs. Just make sure to backup the stuff you really care about to an HDD. Things that really matter and can't just be replaced. I.E. things you have created, Photos of your kids, Artwork you've created, papers or books you may have written, Music you've created, or anything that took you a boat load of time to organize/process. Things you can replace that just don't matter at all. I.E. Your Operating System and Programs. *With a caveat, if you have specialty software that would be tricky to re-setup. It would be best to set everything up the way you need it. Make a backup, test the backup, store the backup in 2 different places, and then continue like normal.

        --
        Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
        • (Score: 2) by digitalaudiorock on Wednesday January 20 2021, @03:35PM (2 children)

          by digitalaudiorock (688) on Wednesday January 20 2021, @03:35PM (#1102881)

          Thanks! Yea...maybe I'll consider it at some point. But frankly everything (including disk IO) is so fast on this thing (especially compared to what I'm used to) I'm not sure I'd notice all that much difference. Hell...the BIOS/EFI part of booting the system is already several times the few seconds it takes me to boot to a graphical UI and to open the programs I frequently use. Love this thing.

          • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Wednesday January 20 2021, @04:10PM (1 child)

            by Freeman (732) on Wednesday January 20 2021, @04:10PM (#1102906) Journal

            The BIOS/UEFI part of booting the system could possibly be reduced even further, there are fast boot options in most Motherboards. Even on my several years old B350 motherboard, the motherboard initialization process is no more than a few seconds.

            --
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            • (Score: 2) by digitalaudiorock on Wednesday January 20 2021, @08:44PM

              by digitalaudiorock (688) on Wednesday January 20 2021, @08:44PM (#1103078)

              Actually yes...this one has a fast boot for sure. I had that set for a while and it was faster, though not really all that much. The fact is however that this machine is generally up 24/7 most of the time so it's a little moot. Launching programs and other OS related stuff on this machine is literally instantaneous for me despite the spinning disks, which is the important thing.

    • (Score: 2) by hendrikboom on Sunday January 17 2021, @12:56PM (1 child)

      by hendrikboom (1125) on Sunday January 17 2021, @12:56PM (#1101476) Homepage Journal

      Interested in a box with a

      24-code ARM processor [96boards.org]?
      Each core is fourfold multithreaded, which makes 96 hardware threads.

      There's a two-year-old video [youtu.be] made while it was under development. I wonder what happened to it since..

      (It *looks* as if it has two ethernet ports, but they say one of them is used for the "interconnect fabric", whatever that is, so they're marketing it as having only one.)

      -- hendrik

  • (Score: 1) by zion-fueled on Friday January 15 2021, @06:05PM (1 child)

    by zion-fueled (8646) on Friday January 15 2021, @06:05PM (#1100686)

    I went with Ryzen. No intel for me, at least on the desktop. Even if it were faster it costs 2x as much and is chock full of shady features.

    • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Tuesday January 19 2021, @04:46PM

      by Freeman (732) on Tuesday January 19 2021, @04:46PM (#1102448) Journal

      It used to cost 2X as much. Depending on your build, you may still be able to build a much more frugal AMD machine. Assuming you're going for the latest stuff, the AMD offerings are getting a lot closer price wise compared to Intel. Though, AMD generally still tends to be a bit less expensive.

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