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posted by martyb on Tuesday April 06 2021, @12:30AM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the The-Hummingbird-has-Landed dept.

On the ground! The Mars helicopter, Ingenuity, has been dropped from Perseverance onto the Martian surface.
Article at the Verge.

NASA’s Perseverance rover, which is currently roaming around Mars, has dropped off the mini helicopter Ingenuity ahead of the four-pound aircraft’s historic first flight.

Ingenuity dropped four inches from the belly of Perseverance to the surface of Mars.

[...] Now that Ingenuity is separated from Perseverance, it will need to power and heat itself. Ingenuity will draw power from the sun using its onboard solar panels, but its heater will have the tough job of keeping the helicopter warm through the freezing cold nights on Mars, where temperatures can go as low as negative 130 degrees Fahrenheit, according to Bob Balaram, Ingenuity’s chief engineer.

I have no doubt that at some point, in the future, a Martian colonialist kid will find a really neat toy.

Just The Picture.


Original Submission

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NASA's Ingenuity Helicopter Survives First Freezing Night on Mars 19 comments

News at CNN:

(CNN) The Ingenuity helicopter survived its first night on the freezing-cold surface of Mars, a major milestone in the rotorcraft's journey ahead of its historic first flight.

Jezero Crater, an ancient lake bed on Mars and the current site of the Perseverance rover and Ingenuity helicopter, can drop to temperatures of minus 130 degrees Fahrenheit. That's low enough to do significant damage to the helicopter's electrical and battery components.

The 4-pound helicopter finally separated on April 3 from the belly of the Perseverance rover, where it has been stashed since before the rover launched from Earth in July.

Ingenuity went through a series of movements to unfold from beneath the rover, which looked like the metamorphosis of a butterfly, before dropping the final 4 inches to the Martian surface.

[...] "This is the first time that Ingenuity has been on its own on the surface of Mars," said MiMi Aung, Ingenuity project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, in a statement. "But we now have confirmation that we have the right insulation, the right heaters, and enough energy in its battery to survive the cold night, which is a big win for the team. We're excited to continue to prepare Ingenuity for its first flight test."

When Ingenuity does fly, which could happen as soon as April 11, it will be the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. In a nod to the first such feat conducted on Earth, Ingenuity carries a swatch of fabric from the Wright brothers' plane, Flyer 1.

Ingenuity, the first rotorcraft sent to Mars, presented a challenge to the engineers who designed it for several reasons. It needed to be small enough to tuck up under the rover without endangering Perseverance's mission, which is the first to search for evidence of ancient microbial life on Mars.

April 11, or 4-11! Or later.

Previously:>br> NASA’s Mars Rover Drops Off Ingenuity Helicopter Ahead of Historic Flight
First Flight on Mars? Ingenuity Helicopter Preps for Takeoff
NASA Lays Out Plans for its First Flights on Mars


Original Submission

NASA's Mars Helicopter Ingenuity Set for 7th Red Planet Flight on Sunday 9 comments

Never Say Never Again

NASA's Mars helicopter Ingenuity set for 7th Red Planet flight on Sunday:

NASA's Mars helicopter Ingenuity will take to the air again this weekend, if all goes according to plan.

Ingenuity's handlers are prepping the 4-lb. (1.8 kilograms) chopper for its seventh Martian flight, which will take place no earlier than Sunday (June 6). The plan is to send Ingenuity to a new airfield, about 350 feet (105 meters) south of its current location on the floor of Jezero Crater.

"This will mark the second time the helicopter will land at an airfield that it did not survey from the air during a previous flight," NASA officials wrote in an update on Friday (June 4). "Instead, the Ingenuity team is relying on imagery collected by the HiRISE camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter that suggests this new base of operations is relatively flat and has few surface obstructions."

Data from the flight will be beamed home to Earth over the three days following the flight, they added.

Video:See the view on Mars from Ingenuity helicopter's fourth flight

Previously:
Surviving an In-Flight Anomaly: What Happened on Ingenuity's Sixth Flight
Mars Helicopter Suffered Glitch During Flight, Forced Emergency Landing
Mars Helicopter Flight Delayed to No Earlier than April 14
NASA's Ingenuity Helicopter Survives First Freezing Night on Mars
NASA's Mars Rover Drops Off Ingenuity Helicopter Ahead of Historic Flight
First Flight on Mars? Ingenuity Helicopter Preps for Takeoff
NASA Lays Out Plans for its First Flights on Mars


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday April 06 2021, @12:34AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday April 06 2021, @12:34AM (#1133701)

    ... and one giant leap for dronekind.

    • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Tuesday April 06 2021, @09:48PM

      by FatPhil (863) <reversethis-{if.fdsa} {ta} {tnelyos-cp}> on Tuesday April 06 2021, @09:48PM (#1134043) Homepage
      To be honest, it may not be Apollo 33 1/3rd, but after seeing the Veritasium vid on the development and testing of the little critter does actually make me feel quite excited to see it leave the nest in an environment it's never been able to be tested in. (A tether does not similate differing gravity, as it induces a torque - worse, a correcting torque.)
      --
      I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday April 06 2021, @12:37AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday April 06 2021, @12:37AM (#1133703)

    It's got the photoshop watermark.

    Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice... you can't fool me again!

    • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday April 06 2021, @06:04AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday April 06 2021, @06:04AM (#1133777)

      Filmed in a studio in Kentucky, just like the Apollo missions, and the tests of the COVID-19 vaccines, and the proof that the Earth is round. Bat-shit crazy is the new conservative uneducated not too bright Runaway post.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday April 06 2021, @07:57AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday April 06 2021, @07:57AM (#1133796)

    That's -73 degrees Réaumur.

    • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Tuesday April 06 2021, @09:37PM

      by FatPhil (863) <reversethis-{if.fdsa} {ta} {tnelyos-cp}> on Tuesday April 06 2021, @09:37PM (#1134038) Homepage
      Nice trololololing - but you should have used Kekvin instead:

        https://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/functions/standards/isu.html :
      '''
      International System of Units - The Metric Measurement System

      [image-62]Public Law 94-168, §2 requires use of the International System of Units for measurement in U.S. Government programs, "except where impractical." That requirement is reflected in NASA policy, NPD 7120.4. That measurement system, formally known as the "SI" system," after its name in French, Systeme Internationale, is almost universally used by all countries except the United States.
      '''
      --
      I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
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