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posted by martyb on Tuesday May 04, @12:41AM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the snake-oil dept.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/05/technician-for-water-co-linked-to-liver-failure-says-his-dog-got-liver-illness/

The lead water technician for Real Water—a Las Vegas-based company that produces "alkalized" bottled water now linked to liver failure cases—testified that he had no relevant experience to be a water technician when he was promoted to the position last August.

Real Water's lead technician, Casey Aiken, 40, is a former vacuum and timeshare salesman who began working for Real Water last June after losing his job as a strip club promoter. According to a taped deposition from late March that was obtained by the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Aiken was promoted from his job of loading bottled water onto shipping pallets to the company's lead technician after "a couple hours" of training.

In late November, just a few months after Aiken's promotion, five infants and children who drank the water developed acute non-viral hepatitis, which led to acute liver failure, health officials say. [...] Real Water's branded water was the only common link between the cases.

[...] But according to Aiken's testimony, the company should have been aware of the problem with the water right when it occurred in November. Aiken's own dog developed a liver illness that month after drinking water Aiken brought home from work. The dog recovered after his wife identified the water as the possible source of the illness and told Aiken to stop giving it to him.

[...] "It is crucial that consumers, restaurants, distributors, and retailers not drink, cook with, sell, or serve "Real Water" alkaline water," the FDA said in its latest investigation update. "FDA also advises that this water not be served to pets."

Previously:
FDA Slams "Real Water" Linked to Liver Failure; Water Plant Manager MIA


Original Submission

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FDA Slams "Real Water" Linked to Liver Failure; Water Plant Manager MIA 37 comments

FDA slams “Real Water” linked to liver failure; water plant manager MIA

The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday admonished Nevada-based company Real Water for being uncooperative in a multi-state health investigation linked to its “alkalized” water products. The company is accused of poisoning its customers, causing acute liver failure and other serious health problems in adults, children, and pets.

On March 16, the FDA and the Southern Nevada Health District announced that they were investigating cases of acute non-viral hepatitis (resulting in acute liver failure) in five infants and children, all of whom consumed the company’s alkaline water. The water was the only common link between the five children and infants. Since then, customers have filed several lawsuits making similar claims, including three Californian women who filed a federal lawsuit in Nevada March 22 seeking class-action status.


Original Submission

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  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @01:04AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @01:04AM (#1145887)

    Cut from the previous SN discussion of this product:

    Re:Alkaline water (Score: 0, Troll)
    by Ethanol-fueled (2792) Neutral on Thursday April 01, @10:44PM (#1132375) Homepage

    If Jews can't poison the wells, they'll just poison the water they sell you. Also the vaccines they sell you. Looks like poisoning Goyim is back on the menu since the Epstein Weinstein cash flow is cut off. You know, since Jews hate America and are accepting Chinese money to weaken America. Ask MIT and the Jew-run Ivy League if you don't believe me. Well maybe they can harvest some more organs from all those young folk they're bringing across the border.
    Parent

            Re:Alkaline water (Score: 1, Informative)
            by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 01, @10:57PM (#1132377)

            This antisemitism is getting boring, here's the owner of Real Water, a Scientologist:
                    https://www.reviewjournal.com/news/politics-and-government/nevada/real-water-ceo-had-brief-controversial-political-career-in-nevada-2314838/ [reviewjournal.com] [reviewjournal.com]

                    Before Henderson-based Real Water made national news as the subject of an FDA investigation and several lawsuits alleging health concerns, the company’s president made headlines during a brief career in Nevada politics.

                    Brent A. Jones, CEO of Real Water parent company Affinity Lifestyles, previously served a single term in the Nevada Assembly from 2015-16 before losing his bid for re-election and failing to advance out of the Republican primary for lieutenant governor in 2018.
                    ...
                    In 2016, Jones was accused of forcing a former Real Water employee to watch videos based on the Church of Scientology as part of her employment. Jones, a Scientologist, denied the allegation, and the lawsuit was moved to arbitration. The result was unclear.

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by Runaway1956 on Tuesday May 04, @01:11AM (12 children)

    by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday May 04, @01:11AM (#1145889) Homepage Journal

    The man brought water home from work, fed it to his dog, and the dog got sick. Vet told him the water was poison. His wife told him the water was poison. And, he didn't notify the government? The media? Nobody?

    I see potential liability for failing to notify the authorities. This isn't some questionable manufacturing process, this seems pretty clear evidence that his employer was packaging poison for human consumption.

    --
    "I didn't lose to him!" - The Donald referring to Trippin' Joe
    • (Score: 5, Insightful) by krishnoid on Tuesday May 04, @01:42AM

      by krishnoid (1156) on Tuesday May 04, @01:42AM (#1145902)

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it." -- Upton Sinclair [goodreads.com]

    • (Score: 2) by krishnoid on Tuesday May 04, @01:45AM (1 child)

      by krishnoid (1156) on Tuesday May 04, @01:45AM (#1145903)

      "Hey, let's package regular water [youtu.be] and sell it as something special."
      "No, we're going to package and market something that might kill people and sell that instead. What are you, stupid?"

      • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday May 04, @01:44PM

        by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday May 04, @01:44PM (#1146128) Journal

        Pirates: dead men tell no tails

        Businessman: dead customers tell no government agencies

        --
        The opposite of Pro is Con. The opposite of Progress is ___gress.
    • (Score: 5, Insightful) by drussell on Tuesday May 04, @10:58AM (3 children)

      by drussell (2678) on Tuesday May 04, @10:58AM (#1146077) Journal

      The man brought water home from work, fed it to his dog, and the dog got sick. Vet told him the water was poison. His wife told him the water was poison. And, he didn't notify the government? The media? Nobody?

      I see potential liability for failing to notify the authorities.

      I'm pretty sure that's why the guy is now pushing the narrative that he was unqualified and should never have been put in the job in the first place, his lawyers will be attempting to distance him from potential liability. Regardless of his actual qualifications, it certainly seems like something that would normally considered common sense in a situation like this. 🤦

      It wasn't the addition of some potassium bicarbonate to water that caused these health problems. Mildly alkaline water won't give you hepatitis, the water was contaminated somehow. If you're a company selling any type of bottled water, you would think that one of your main goals would be to ensure your water was in fact safe, clean and actually fit for consumption, but apparently not. 🤦

      P.S. As an aside, the total silliness of the whole ridiculous, wasteful bottled water industry must be nearing peak insanity when people are purchasing "designer" bottled water to give to their pets. The level of bottled water consumption by humans is dumb enough, now Fido needs Perrier? Geez, is our species ever doomed!

      • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Tuesday May 04, @12:38PM (1 child)

        by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday May 04, @12:38PM (#1146107) Homepage Journal

        I'm pretty sure that's why the guy is now pushing the narrative that he was unqualified

        I am, of course, not a lawyer. I think that narrative *may* cover his ass in civil court. I'm not so sure about criminal liability. If a prosecutor files charges (criminal negligence?) against the owner and/or the company, this guy may well be one of the people charged. Somehow, I don't think the "I was promoted out of my depth" defense will work all that well in criminal court.

        --
        "I didn't lose to him!" - The Donald referring to Trippin' Joe
        • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Tuesday May 04, @02:23PM

          by FatPhil (863) <{pc-soylent} {at} {asdf.fi}> on Tuesday May 04, @02:23PM (#1146144) Homepage
          I am included to concur. And that's how it *should* work. You shouldn't be putting the lowest member of staff who could have prevented this in the dock, you should put the *highest* member of staff who could have prevented this there instead. The former is scapegoating.
          --
          I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 08, @10:47PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 08, @10:47PM (#1147641)

        uhm ... maybe Perrier will make your cat purrr??

    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday May 04, @01:42PM (4 children)

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday May 04, @01:42PM (#1146127) Journal

      . . . told him the water was poison. And, he didn't notify the government?

      Why should he tell the government? That would imply there should be some sort of (omg!) Regulation on a private profitable business. And this could put his employer out of business, and thus leave him unemployed!

      Didn't you get the massage that government regulation of business is always bad in all cases 100% of the time without exception?

      The free market will sort it all out.

      And their advertising was truthful. See the picture [arstechnica.net] in TFA.

      REAL ALKALIZED WATER
      Beyond Alkalinity . . .
      alkalized water infused with negative (-) ions.
      You will taste and feel THIS difference!

      --
      The opposite of Pro is Con. The opposite of Progress is ___gress.
      • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday May 04, @01:50PM (3 children)

        by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday May 04, @01:50PM (#1146134) Journal

        More truth in advertising from the back of the bottle. (See pictures in TFA)

        TRANSFORM YOURSELF WITH REAL WATER!

        • Unleash the power of negative ions.
        • Experience the power of alkalinity.
        • Hydrate like never before

        Also: hydrate like never again.

        C'mon McFly! Are you chicken!

        It's just water. Almost anything is drinkable or edible -- at least once.

        --
        The opposite of Pro is Con. The opposite of Progress is ___gress.
  • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @01:51AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @01:51AM (#1145906)
  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @02:52AM (13 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @02:52AM (#1145938)

    Being a bit alkaline shouldn't cause liver failure. What the hell was in that water?

    • (Score: 2, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @03:54AM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @03:54AM (#1145966)

      LEAD

      He was Lead Tech. Putting Lead into water or carrying water via lead pipes, is a bad idea!

      • (Score: 4, Funny) by pkrasimirov on Tuesday May 04, @04:44AM

        by pkrasimirov (3358) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday May 04, @04:44AM (#1145988)

        Not lead, it was scientology dissolved in the water. Young and sick people are the most vulnerable.

    • (Score: -1, Redundant) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @04:45AM (2 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @04:45AM (#1145990)

      Hepatitis causes liver failure. I haven't seen any reports stating which variety, but somebody has some explaining to do.

      • (Score: 2) by Immerman on Tuesday May 04, @02:40PM (1 child)

        by Immerman (3985) on Tuesday May 04, @02:40PM (#1146151)

        Hepatitis *describes* liver disease - specifically liver inflammation. It's often caused by one of a family of viruses (confusingly also called hepatitis), but lots of of other things can cause it as well.

        > five infants and children who drank the water developed acute non-viral hepatitis

        So in this case it's non-viral, as in no relation to the STD, cold sores, or other viral hepatitis.

        The other options for contamination-related hepatitis are a bacterial, parasitic, or chemical cause.

        Bacteria or parasites would likely be a huge liability issue, but would also likely already have been identified, and probably wouldn't spontaneously clear up after exposure stopped, so my money is on chemical contamination.

        And liability around chemical contamination is murky. It's perfectly legal to include incidental amounts of poison in food and beverages - in fact given the level of environmental contamination it's almost impossible not to. So long as they're below the regulatory limits for known poisons they're potentially in the clear. At least assuming they didn't do something really stupid like adding industrial bicarbonate rather than food-grade.

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @05:02AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @05:02AM (#1145995)

      The city of Henderson is famous for a massive explosion at a factory that was producing ammonium perchlorate for the Space Shuttle solid rocket boosters.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PEPCON_disaster [wikipedia.org]

    • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @10:50AM (6 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @10:50AM (#1146075)

      It's not 'a bit' alkaline. It's 9.0. That's on a log scale, btw. Sea water PH is 8.1 with all the salts in it, namely Calcium Carbonate. And you can't add more and more to get higher PH since it doesn't dissolve.

      If it was a little bit more alkaline, it would cause burns down your digestive track. If you are an idiot that believes this shit, you'd be safer eating chalk.

      • (Score: 3, Informative) by drussell on Tuesday May 04, @12:53PM (3 children)

        by drussell (2678) on Tuesday May 04, @12:53PM (#1146114) Journal

        It's not 'a bit' alkaline. It's 9.0. That's on a log scale, btw. Sea water PH is 8.1 with all the salts in it, namely Calcium Carbonate.

        Where did you get the 9.0 pH value from?

        All their marketing wankery states that it was supposed to be 8.0

        • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Tuesday May 04, @02:29PM (2 children)

          by FatPhil (863) <{pc-soylent} {at} {asdf.fi}> on Tuesday May 04, @02:29PM (#1146148) Homepage
          pH 9.0 confirmed in photo of the product linked to upthread: https://soylentnews.org/comments.pl?noupdate=1&sid=43366&page=1&cid=1146127#commentwrap

          Marketting wankery gonna marketting wank, don't expect sense, or consistency.

          I like how (from the same photo) it's "beyond alkalinity".

          (shut up, don't interrupt me here...)

          Given that alkalinity goes all the way to pH 14, beyond alkalinity must be *even more than that*.
          --
          I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
          • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Tuesday May 04, @02:32PM

            by FatPhil (863) <{pc-soylent} {at} {asdf.fi}> on Tuesday May 04, @02:32PM (#1146149) Homepage
            Hmmm, maybe he thought it was a possible CoViD cure:

            Beyond Alkalinity = Likely an antibody

            (anagram)
            --
            I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 08, @11:00PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 08, @11:00PM (#1147648)

            You know how they have those videos where a math major takes an engineering class.

            I would like to see a video of a chemistry major taking a marketing class ...

      • (Score: 2) by DeathMonkey on Tuesday May 04, @04:33PM (1 child)

        by DeathMonkey (1380) on Tuesday May 04, @04:33PM (#1146218) Journal
        • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @04:38PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @04:38PM (#1146220)

          That's why dosing matters. IIRC, milk of magnesia is intended to treat indigestion amongst other things. You're not supposed to drink it as a replacement for water.

  • (Score: 2) by EJ on Tuesday May 04, @06:09AM

    by EJ (2452) on Tuesday May 04, @06:09AM (#1146012)

    Well, there's your problem. Didn't we learn from Flint Michigan they shouldn't be selling people lead water?

  • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @06:45PM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 04, @06:45PM (#1146263)

    'Real Water's lead technician, Casey Aiken, 40, is a former vacuum and timeshare salesman who began working for Real Water last June after losing his job as a strip club promoter. "

    you can't make this shit up...

    • (Score: 2) by Osamabobama on Tuesday May 04, @07:53PM

      by Osamabobama (5842) on Tuesday May 04, @07:53PM (#1146275)

      So you're saying they promoted him based on his track record of ethical sales in the past? It was probably the right choice for their corporate strategy. I mean, their value proposition would have to focus on making people believe unreasonable things.

      --
      Appended to the end of comments you post. Max: 120 chars.
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 05, @04:51PM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 05, @04:51PM (#1146509)

    Tap water has some strict standards.
    Bottled water standards are far looser than for tap. As a matter if fact, what ARE the standards? That it not be visibly murky?

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 05, @04:53PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 05, @04:53PM (#1146510)

      Updating my comment: I believe bottled water standards are left to the states with Massachusetts having some of the stronger ones. Someone please correct me if I am wrong.

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