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posted by mrpg on Wednesday June 16 2021, @10:20AM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]

'Unplanned' outages hit Texas power plants in soaring temperatures

Officials with Texas' power grid operator pleaded with residents Monday to limit their electrical usage amid soaring temperatures and a series of mechanical problems at power plants.

The appeal, from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, comes four months after deadly blackouts during a winter storm left millions of people without power — and weeks after state legislators passed a package of measures aimed at fixing some of the problems exposed by the storm.

Officials with the nonprofit group, which oversees 90 percent of Texas' energy production, asked residents to set their thermostats higher, turn off lights and avoid using larger appliances until Friday.

A spokeswoman for the group told reporters that the outages accounted for more than 12,000 megawatts, enough to power 2.4 million homes. Some areas of the state, including Dallas and Tarrant counties, were warned about poor air quality and potentially dangerous heat, with the heat index approaching 110 degrees.

A senior official with ERCOT, Warren Lasher, said it wasn't clear why there were so many unplanned outages. But he said that the group is "deeply concerned" about the plants that are offline and that a thorough investigation is being conducted to better understand the problems.


Original Submission

Related Stories

Texans' Smart Thermostats Raised Remotely 98 comments

The headline at WFAA reads: 'Woke up sweating': Some Texans shocked to find their smart thermostats were raised remotely

When Deer Park resident Brandon English got home from work on Wednesday, his house was hot.

[...] His wife received an alert on her phone soon after that. The family said their thermostat had been changed remotely, raising the temperature of their home during a three-hour “energy saving event.”

The family’s smart thermostat was installed a few years ago as part of a new home security package. Many smart thermostats can be enrolled in a program called "Smart Savers Texas." It's operated by a company called EnergyHub.

The agreement states that in exchange for an entry into sweepstakes, electric customers allow them to control their thermostats during periods of high energy demand. EnergyHub’s list of its clients include TXU Energy, CenterPoint and ERCOT.

Previously:
'Unplanned' Outages Hit Texas Power Plants in Soaring Temperatures


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 1, Troll) by crafoo on Wednesday June 16 2021, @10:32AM (23 children)

    by crafoo (6639) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @10:32AM (#1145831)

    When the boomers finally die we can build nuclear plants.

    • (Score: 1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @10:39AM (3 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @10:39AM (#1145834)

      Yes but you millennials will hire nuclear plant designers based on their hair colour and number of preferred genders, leading to a whole new round of problems.

      • (Score: 2, Funny) by Runaway1956 on Wednesday June 16 2021, @10:44AM (1 child)

        by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @10:44AM (#1145837) Homepage Journal

        They'll be taking a census of uranium atoms to determine the proper gender ratios of the atoms.

        --
        Taking bets: When does Biden's approval rating reach 15%?
        • (Score: 5, Touché) by Tork on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:55PM

          by Tork (3914) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:55PM (#1145989)
          But remember, the reason we're being that specific is we only want to count the votes of some of the atoms.
          --
          Slashdolt Logic: "24 year old jokes about sharks and lasers are +5, Funny." 💩
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @07:53PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @07:53PM (#1146660)

        Ah, you've misunderstood.

        In the 1960's, they would have only hired masculine presenting white males in white shirts with black ties wearing black glasses.

        Now they'll try to hire the most qualified people. But since the bosses are all masculine presenting white males in white shirts with black ties wearing black glasses who originally got hired decades ago, they do some additional outreach to make sure all groups have an opportunity to apply. This is to help account for the extensive data about selection bias of the bosses tending to hire people they find familiar. So if the smartest nuclear engineer has purple hair, they aren't immediately filtered out of the hiring process for "not fitting in." It's not that we want to hire people based on their hair color. We want to avoid *not* hiring someone based on their haircolor like our forebears did. Trying to avoid haircolor based hiring decisions in misinterpreted by narrowminded out of touch fossils as being a haircolor based hiring decision. (Because filtering out people based on haircolor was typically an implicit rather than explicit part of the hiring process, and therefore went unexamined. Because, again, a lack of diversity in the hiring org led to a blindspot about the difference between the actual hiring process and the written hiring process.)

        This is part of why modern reactor designs are so much safer than legacy 1960's designs. There were some technological limitations, but there was also a lot of group think. Lack of outsiders led to a relative lack of "red team" thinking focused on disaster scenarios like Fukushima because engineering culture at the time focused more on consensus building rather than disruption as a path to advancement.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:57PM (9 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:57PM (#1145870)

      Sure, hopefully fusion plants.

      You know there is a great fusion reactor called the sun.
      Problem is, sometimes where we want power rotates away from it.
      I wonder if one could put up solar farms and a super circling the globe to move power from day to night?

      • (Score: 0, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:48PM (7 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:48PM (#1145889)

        We need power now. Just build modern conventional nuke plants. They work.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @02:05PM (6 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @02:05PM (#1145900)

          Replying to my own post: nukes would take too long to build for a realistic answer. Texas needs to clean house with its electric power management board first. Bunch of incompetent cronies.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:00PM (5 children)

            by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:00PM (#1145992)

            "The current management is incompetent, they should build nukes."

            Sigh.

            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:56PM (4 children)

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:56PM (#1146023)

              Not what I said.

              • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:03PM (3 children)

                by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:03PM (#1146030)
                So you were saying "never mind", right?
                • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:23PM (2 children)

                  by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:23PM (#1146048)

                  No, I think he was saying "Shut the fuck up, you lying sack of shit!"

                  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:23PM (1 child)

                    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:23PM (#1146077)
                    Yeah, duh. I just wanted to know if he was retracting his post. Or, in simpler terms: "Not what I said."
                    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @02:17PM

                      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @02:17PM (#1146488)

                      There's no need to retract his post, the response was inaccurate, it's not what he said.

      • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:26PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:26PM (#1145942)

        > Problem is, sometimes where we want power rotates away from it.

        Isn't there some way for the Forestry Service to change the Earth's orbit to correct that problem? *gomert*

    • (Score: 5, Touché) by DannyB on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:46PM (3 children)

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:46PM (#1145888) Journal

      When the boomers finally die we can build nuclear plants.

      Texas definitely needs nuclear because:
      1. being such a tiny state, it lacks sufficient land to construct any solar, wind farms, and battery storage like Australia can do
      2. being located at such high latitude[1], it lacks sufficient bright sunlight to make solar practical.

      [1]Compare direct noon sunlight brightness in Texas or Florida versus, say, North Dakota where the annual funeral director's convention is held. Yes, that is a real thing.

      --
      A large Starlink satellite constellation will be a smashing success!
      • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:58PM (2 children)

        by JoeMerchant (3937) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:58PM (#1145898)
        --
        John Galt is a selfish crybaby [huffpost.com].
        • (Score: 4, Funny) by DannyB on Wednesday June 16 2021, @02:21PM (1 child)

          by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @02:21PM (#1145905) Journal

          I suspect that the Texas legislature will discover "technical reasons" why nuclear just won't work in Texas. Lobbyists have researched this subject and given the legislators many small foldable paper reports on this subject.

          --
          A large Starlink satellite constellation will be a smashing success!
          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:29PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:29PM (#1145943)

            Signed by Benjamin Franklin?

    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Wednesday June 16 2021, @02:45PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @02:45PM (#1145919) Journal

      When the boomers finally die we can build nuclear plants.

      Solar farms are a way to gather nuclear energy.

      --
      A large Starlink satellite constellation will be a smashing success!
    • (Score: 5, Insightful) by mcgrew on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:09PM (1 child)

      by mcgrew (701) <publish@mcgrewbooks.com> on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:09PM (#1145928) Homepage Journal

      It isn't boomers, you dumb ass child, it's the amoral super rich in all generations who don't give a flying fuck about anything but personal riches and power.

      --
      Free Martian whores! [mcgrewbooks.com]
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:30PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:30PM (#1145944)

        Are you saying Don Jr is not passionate about climiate change?

    • (Score: 5, Interesting) by Tork on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:20PM (1 child)

      by Tork (3914) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:20PM (#1145972)

      When the boomers finally die we can build nuclear plants.

      Oh yes, the failing power grid in Texas is the PERFECT TIME to push an alternative whose consequences at the hands of incompetence are far more severe.

      --
      Slashdolt Logic: "24 year old jokes about sharks and lasers are +5, Funny." 💩
      • (Score: 2) by krishnoid on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:55PM

        by krishnoid (1156) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:55PM (#1146057)

        If we're lucky, they'll just rubber-stamp the nuclear plant [fs.blog] and not look too closely into how it works, while they have their hands full with the existing system which continues to have these issues.

  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @10:47AM (13 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @10:47AM (#1145839)

    Looks like ERCOT can only operate in a very specific temperature range and is very delicate. Such a contrast with the image Texas wants to project of itself.

    While I'm too fond of Texas, its people deserve better than the years of Republican mismanagement that are culminating in these gross failures.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @11:23AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @11:23AM (#1145848)

      Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
      Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
      Some like it hot, some like it cold,
      Some like it in the pot, nine days old.

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by driverless on Wednesday June 16 2021, @11:36AM

      by driverless (4770) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @11:36AM (#1145851)

      It's Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Texas style: "This weather is too cold to generate power. This weather is too hot to generate power. Ahh, this weather is just right. For the moment".

    • (Score: 4, Insightful) by Spamalope on Wednesday June 16 2021, @02:18PM

      by Spamalope (5233) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @02:18PM (#1145904) Homepage

      Or... it's operating exactly as intended to produce Enron/Ca type windfall outcomes to speculators.

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by mcgrew on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:13PM (6 children)

      by mcgrew (701) <publish@mcgrewbooks.com> on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:13PM (#1145933) Homepage Journal

      This is America. We have a vote. If your state government elects incompetent fools, it's your own damned fault. So Fuck the state of Texas AND their idiot populace, they got the crooks and morons they stupidly voted for.

      And yes, as an Illinoisian I'm partly responsible for Ryan and Blago, even though I voted against both of them, Blago twice.

      --
      Free Martian whores! [mcgrewbooks.com]
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:36PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:36PM (#1145947)

        Are you sure it isn't something Obama did? I'm sure on Fox News this is because of something Nancy Pelosi forced down Texan's throats...

        And keep it real, Texans are like Americans everywhere - fat, consumer-tards with consumption related medical problems.

      • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:52PM (2 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:52PM (#1145960)

        "Your freedom stops where my freedom begins"
        It's fine for folks to vote in their own numb-nuts, it's not fine for them to vote in numb-nuts that now affect me.

        TX keeps threatening to secede; I say let them. Let's call their bluff...

        • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Wednesday June 16 2021, @08:54PM

          by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @08:54PM (#1146113) Journal

          TX could become part of Mexico. Build a wall along their Northern, Eastern and Western borders.

          --
          A large Starlink satellite constellation will be a smashing success!
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @02:10AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @02:10AM (#1146274)

          Secession is just hot air for the rubes, and gotta love how well it pairs with their self-image as total patriots. bonkers

      • (Score: 2) by krishnoid on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:58PM

        by krishnoid (1156) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:58PM (#1146058)

        In Texas, it's unlikely that dead (of heat-related causes) people will be able to vote one way or another. I know things work a little differently [youtu.be] in Illinois, so you might want to factor that in to your considerations.

      • (Score: 3, Touché) by DeathMonkey on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:32PM

        by DeathMonkey (1380) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:32PM (#1146079) Journal

        Blago was safely sequestered in jail. Apparently to Trump draining the swamp means letting politicians who have been convicted of corruption out of jail.

        Trump commutes sentence of former Ill. Gov. Rod Blagojevich [nbcnews.com]

    • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:50PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:50PM (#1146084)

      "than the years of Republican mismanagement that are culminating in these gross failures."

      No, it's the Jews, and both major parties work for them.

    • (Score: 0, Flamebait) by TheMightyChickadee on Wednesday June 16 2021, @09:38PM

      by TheMightyChickadee (14674) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @09:38PM (#1146133)

      While I'm too fond of Texas, its people deserve better than the years of Republican mismanagement that are culminating in these gross failures.

      But, self-inflicted? Except for the Florida War Criminal former head of the Texas Republican Party.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @07:28AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @07:28AM (#1146391)

      What do you expect, they are just a bunch of snowflakes. Need perfect conditions and go where the winds blow them.

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by c0lo on Wednesday June 16 2021, @11:32AM (13 children)

    by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @11:32AM (#1145849) Journal

    A senior official with ERCOT, Warren Lasher, said it wasn't clear why there were so many unplanned outages

    Boy, those Texans are slow.
    Enron. California. 2000.

    The outages this winter proved very profitable [reuters.com]

    The deep freeze caught Texas's utilities off-guard, killed more than 100 people and left 4.5 million without power. Demand for heat pushed wholesale power costs to 400 times the usual amount and propelled natural gas prices to record highs, forcing utilities and consumers to pay exorbitant bills.
    ...
    The biggest winners were companies with access to supplies, including leading energy trader Vitol, gas suppliers Kinder Morgan (KMI.N), Enterprise Products Partners (EPD.N) and Energy Transfer (ET.N), oil giant BP plc (BP.L), and banks Goldman Sachs (GS.N), Bank of America (BofA) (BAC.N) and Macquarie Group (MQG.AX).

    The firms combined stand to reap billions of dollars in profits by selling gas and power during the storm, according to interviews and reviews of public documents.

    Why do you hate capitalism?

    --
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by bzipitidoo on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:43PM (11 children)

      by bzipitidoo (4388) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:43PM (#1145887) Journal

      Careful there. Capitalism is on trial. 50 years ago, Capitalism was a citizen with a stellar reputation. Much, much better than ... than ... Communism! The boomers might wonder if you're a Commie, with talk like that.

      But now? #exxonknew. And Capitalism has evil relatives with which we're all better acquainted now, named Monopolism and Fascism.

      • (Score: 5, Insightful) by DannyB on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:49PM (4 children)

        by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:49PM (#1145891) Journal

        It's not "Capitalism".

        It's "Capitalism run amok".

        Texas got all the deregulation it wanted, along with the consequent results. Last winter. And now. And it's profitable! So everything working as intended.

        --
        A large Starlink satellite constellation will be a smashing success!
      • (Score: 5, Insightful) by mcgrew on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:16PM (3 children)

        by mcgrew (701) <publish@mcgrewbooks.com> on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:16PM (#1145936) Homepage Journal

        There are two capitalisms: capitalism as a social tool, or as a religion. Capitalism is a useful tool, but an incredibly dangerous religion.

        --
        Free Martian whores! [mcgrewbooks.com]
        • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:32PM (1 child)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:32PM (#1145984)

          Nature abhors any social philosophy taken as a religion, yes.

          • (Score: 1) by fustakrakich on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:07PM

            by fustakrakich (6150) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:07PM (#1146067) Journal

            Funny how societies crumble and the religion remains.

            --
            Ok, we paid the ransom. Do I get my dog back? REDЯUM
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @12:06AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @12:06AM (#1146212)

          'Dangerous' and 'religion' seem historic friends. (The words crusade and holocaust come to mind, but no doubt, that is a vey limited view of the world.)

          Being convinced that something is true because of belief does not make it bad/wrong/silly.
          Belief has helped bring humanity far.

          But is does make it an opportunity for exploit for one wishing to further some cause.

      • (Score: 2) by Tork on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:23PM (1 child)

        by Tork (3914) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:23PM (#1145976)

        50 years ago, Capitalism was a citizen with a stellar reputation.

        Take a moment to think about how you heard that. ;)

        --
        Slashdolt Logic: "24 year old jokes about sharks and lasers are +5, Funny." 💩
        • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Thursday June 17 2021, @10:25AM

          by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday June 17 2021, @10:25AM (#1146412) Homepage Journal

          Agreed. Think "banana republic". Even before the oil wars, we did a lot of shameful crap in the name of profit.

          --
          Taking bets: When does Biden's approval rating reach 15%?
    • (Score: 4, Insightful) by DeathMonkey on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:23PM

      by DeathMonkey (1380) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:23PM (#1145975) Journal

      Any sufficiently libertarian power grid will eventually reimplement Enron.

  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by krokodilerian on Wednesday June 16 2021, @11:52AM (11 children)

    by krokodilerian (6979) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @11:52AM (#1145853)

    I live in a ... pretty much 3rd world country (technically, second world, eastern european), and if this has happened here, there would have been serious protests of the type that makes the government want to go away. How is that not happening in a state in USA where most people are armed?

    I mean, this is a joke, if critical infrastructure can't work in such conditions, the people running it should be replaced (and preferably shot).

    • (Score: 4, Funny) by FatPhil on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:46PM (2 children)

      by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:46PM (#1145866) Homepage
      Fellow Eastern European here. I've not been without electricity for the best part of 10 years apart from some announced-2-months-in-advance infrastructural modernisation that removed power to our city block for about 5 hours (they had warned us of 6 hours downtime, so nicely within schedule). Which really annoyed me, as I lost 1200 days uptime on one of my RasPis.
      --
      I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
      • (Score: 1, Touché) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:32PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:32PM (#1145880)

        as I lost 1200 days uptime on one of my RasPis.

        Whiner. Every RasPi sysadm worth their weight in street dust connect them through a power bank [ebay.co.uk].

        • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Thursday June 17 2021, @06:37AM

          by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Thursday June 17 2021, @06:37AM (#1146377) Homepage
          Tried that. The simultanious charge and discharge functionality I was promised didn't work, as soon as charging started or completed there was a momentary glitch in the output which killed the Pi. And what's this solar thing that device mentions - I'm in ultima thule here.
          --
          I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
    • (Score: 2) by Dale on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:59PM (2 children)

      by Dale (539) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:59PM (#1145871)

      Realistically because it really isn't that hot yet. mid-90s is super early summer. A couple of years ago I believe we cracked 100 consecutive days of over 100 degree temps. It simply hasn't been too terribly hot so far (but it is coming). Large areas of Texas have also not had any power disruption (as many areas were not impacted during the freeze). That isn't to say there aren't issues and that some aren't impacted by them. I'm just saying that it isn't a large enough social issue at the moment to invoke the type of response you are expecting. That being said, the day is coming with the "we show up to vote" population of the major cities will weigh the "we show up to vote better" massive rural areas. Until that scale tips there isn't anything that can happen.

      • (Score: 2) by bzipitidoo on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:54PM (1 child)

        by bzipitidoo (4388) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:54PM (#1145894) Journal

        Yes, this. Not hot enough yet. But come July and August, if half of Texas can't use the A/C, heads will roll. They could tell the residents that February was a freak occurrence, and get away with that one because it was the first winter in a long time that there'd been mass power outages. But to have it happen again, same year? With the different season putting the lie to the excuses they ran with in the winter? It's going to be "Republicans: they can't keep the lights on." Then, maybe, all this drama over social conservatism will look decidedly unimportant next to the necessities. The Republicans are in power, but they won't stay in power if they can't keep the state's power on.

        • (Score: 3, Insightful) by DannyB on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:57PM

          by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:57PM (#1146024) Journal

          Keeping the state's power on might require . . . OMG . . . I'm gonna actually say it . . . regulation!

          --
          A large Starlink satellite constellation will be a smashing success!
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:43PM (3 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:43PM (#1145951)

      Silly, guns are for defending yourself from poor people not the govt.

      • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:06PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:06PM (#1145996)

        They are also good for compensating for manhood insecurities.

      • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:03PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:03PM (#1146031)

        I know, right? Certain ethnicities have a right to murder and assault others unchecked. Isn't that the law now?

        Most murders and robberies in America are committed by black people, yet they only make up less than 14% of the population. Look up the govt stats.

        • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:58PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:58PM (#1146086)

          it's also Blacks attacking Asians, but the reanimated corpse that stumbles around in the Whitehouse blames "white supremacists" and uses the excuse to mobilize the FBI against law abiding dissident whites. It's OK. I hope they get their way with some of their plans soon, so people will wake up.

          https://odysee.com/@modernpolitics:0/ModPol-Greenwald:9 [odysee.com]

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Tork on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:56PM

      by Tork (3914) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:56PM (#1146022)

      How is that not happening in a state in USA where most people are armed?

      We treat politics like sports teams, hence all the contrarianism. You know how some cities have been rummaged after a big loss? We had a notable one of those on Jan 6th.

      --
      Slashdolt Logic: "24 year old jokes about sharks and lasers are +5, Funny." 💩
  • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:06PM (12 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:06PM (#1145858)

    one assumes that the "soaring temperatures" originate from the sun and not from geothermal earth or from some nuke xploding ...
    coupled to the required norm of "anti-islanding" of pv generators this is very convinient to avoid data being generated that would show how much electricity is being supplied on "sunny days".
    also let's get this entropy debate going again:
    air-con split type compressor sits shaded under, say, 10 square meters of pv cells (providing about 1100 watts) -vs- fossile fuel or nuke powered compressor (also 1100 watts).
    which one contributes ZERO increase in average temperature? which one increases average temperature in an already hot environment?

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by c0lo on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:32PM (11 children)

      by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:32PM (#1145862) Journal

      which one increases average temperature in an already hot environment?

      The total amount of energy received by the Earth from the Sun in one hour is about π*(6371e3)2*1300 [wikipedia.org]Wh =1.66e17 Wh.

      The total energy produced by humans in 2019 is about 170,000 TWh = 1.7e17Wh [ourworldindata.org]

      So, your argument is technically correct but weak. As weak as 1/(365*24) = 0.000114

      the "enhottening" of the environment is related to the amount of energy that the extra CO2 captures from the Sun rather than the extra heat that the humans manages to produce. Strictly from the point of view of avoiding extra CO2, solar or nuclear are equivalent

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
      • (Score: 1) by js290 on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:10PM (10 children)

        by js290 (14148) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:10PM (#1145929)

        This is a layman's summary of our new #climate [twitter.com] concept emerging from analysis of recent NASA planetary observations from across the Solar System (including Earth) described in these papers:
        1. https://t.co/tz4NKfZke6 [t.co]
        2. https://t.co/K2GW8tmBjA [t.co]
        Please, give it a wide distribution! pic.twitter.com/W6zNkF6p9r [t.co]

        — Ned Nikolov, Ph.D. (@NikolovScience) October 22, 2018 [twitter.com]

        • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:31PM (8 children)

          by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:31PM (#1145945) Journal

          Interesting but fishy

          From the second link

          Our analysis revealed that GMATs of rocky planets with tangible atmospheres and a negligible geothermal surface heating can accurately be predicted over a broad range of conditions using only two forcing variables: top-of-the-atmosphere solar irradiance and total surface atmospheric pressure.

          I don't think that the solar irradiance or total surface atmospheric pressure changed much over the last 200ky. And yet we had a glaciation until about 12000-11000 years ago.

          --
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
          • (Score: 1) by js290 on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:59PM (7 children)

            by js290 (14148) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:59PM (#1145962)

            I don't think that the solar irradiance or total surface atmospheric pressure changed much over the last 200ky...

            relative to CO2? which is still less than 0.05% of atmospheric gases by volume.

            And yet we had a glaciation until about 12000-11000 years ago.

            See Younger Dryas impact hypothesis...

            Was this the reason for North American ice melt that some have proposed? @graham_hancock [twitter.com] #Randallcarlson [twitter.com]
            Greenland ice sheet hides huge 'impact crater' https://t.co/n8mevkrdLx [t.co]

            — Perception Machine (@Percepmachine) November 18, 2018 [twitter.com]

            • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:26PM (6 children)

              by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:26PM (#1145981) Journal

              which is still less than 0.05% of atmospheric gases by volume.

              Which still jumped 60% since and over the level at the beginning of the industrial revolution [i.redd.it].
              Still a better hypothesis for the warming of the climate than an yet to be discovered impact crater, which supposedly melt the ice... what... in North America only?
              And better than just "two forcing variables: top-of-the-atmosphere solar irradiance and total surface atmospheric pressure" which remained pretty constant over the recent period.

              --
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
              • (Score: 0, Redundant) by js290 on Wednesday June 16 2021, @11:04PM (5 children)

                by js290 (14148) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @11:04PM (#1146173)

                In other words, ATE is a form of adiabatic compression heating that is independent of atmospheric composition and governed by Laws of Thermodynamics, which are not gas-specific. The IR back radiation is a BYPRODUCT of atmos. temp. & ATE. Hence, there are NO "greenhouse gases"! pic.twitter.com/1cVYm5fhKb [t.co]

                — Ned Nikolov, Ph.D. (@NikolovScience) June 16, 2021 [twitter.com]

                "Wittgenstein's ruler: Unless you have confidence in the ruler's reliability, if you use a ruler to measure a table you may also be using the table to measure the ruler." - Nassim Nicholas Taleb

                — Nassim Nicholas Taleb's Wisdom (@TalebWisdom) May 27, 2021 [twitter.com]

                Most of the time, people’s observations about something else reveal more about the observer than what’s being observed.

                — Kieran McCarthy (@joyousandswift) May 6, 2020 [twitter.com]

        • (Score: 2) by janrinok on Thursday June 17 2021, @05:38AM

          by janrinok (52) Subscriber Badge on Thursday June 17 2021, @05:38AM (#1146368) Journal
          Can you please just provide the direct links and not keep giving us Twitter.
          --
          It's always my fault...
  • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:54PM (3 children)

    by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Wednesday June 16 2021, @12:54PM (#1145869) Homepage
    https://i.imgur.com/egyVYuy.mp4
    --
    I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
    • (Score: 2) by PiMuNu on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:36PM (1 child)

      by PiMuNu (3823) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:36PM (#1145883)

      Must be fake. But Lol.

      • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Wednesday June 16 2021, @08:22PM

        by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Wednesday June 16 2021, @08:22PM (#1146099) Homepage
        The thing is that so much she said was basically equivalent to what Enron, or whatever they call themselves, has said. Poes law applies to business communication too. Glad you enjoyed it.
        --
        I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
    • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:57PM

      by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:57PM (#1145897) Journal

      No close captions nor transcription too. You expect me to lip read or what?
      What I need is a rare, vermillion, ukrainian unicorn [youtu.be]

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
  • (Score: 2) by oumuamua on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:33PM (10 children)

    by oumuamua (8401) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:33PM (#1145881)

    Gas and diesel generators. When your green energy grid has a high-demand backup of home generators it becomes very un-green.

    • (Score: 5, Interesting) by Thexalon on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:53PM (2 children)

      by Thexalon (636) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @01:53PM (#1145893)

      The idea that Texas has a "green" energy grid is ludicrous. They've been resisting "green" anything quite firmly for decades now.

      But I would recommend anybody with their own home in Texas start figuring out how to add in solar or wind generation to their homes, so they can power it when ERCOT bites the dust, as has happened twice in the last few months.

      Oh, and I assume that Cancun is awaiting Ted Cruz's arrival.

      --
      The inverse of "I told you so" is "Nobody could have predicted"
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:10PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:10PM (#1145967)

        You obviously forgot about T. Boone Pickens. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T._Boone_Pickens [wikipedia.org]

        • (Score: 2) by Thexalon on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:53PM

          by Thexalon (636) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @07:53PM (#1146085)

          I'm familiar with Pickens and his plan for renewable energy. I'm also well aware that the Texas state government, very much in the pockets of oil and gas barons, has zero interest in making it happen.

          --
          The inverse of "I told you so" is "Nobody could have predicted"
    • (Score: 2) by DeathMonkey on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:20PM

      by DeathMonkey (1380) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:20PM (#1145973) Journal

      Gas and diesel generators.

      The gas plants are the ones going down, AGAIN!

      Thexalon is actually mistaken, Texas has a lost of wind power. Wind turbines that continues to work find during the cold snap. And those same turbines are continuing to work fine during the heat too.

    • (Score: 3, Funny) by DannyB on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:02PM (2 children)

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:02PM (#1146028) Journal

      It looks to me like Home Depot has lots of Green portable generators. [homedepot.com]

      All I had to do was search for Green Portable Generators.

      --
      A large Starlink satellite constellation will be a smashing success!
      • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Thursday June 17 2021, @10:34AM (1 child)

        by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday June 17 2021, @10:34AM (#1146414) Homepage Journal

        Yeah, I know I'm kinda color blind, but a couple of those greens look yellow to me.

        --
        Taking bets: When does Biden's approval rating reach 15%?
        • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Thursday June 17 2021, @02:48PM

          by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Thursday June 17 2021, @02:48PM (#1146496) Journal

          They only need to look green to you, the user.

          Similarly, anyone can have a green vehicle without having to give up fossil fuel power.

          --
          A large Starlink satellite constellation will be a smashing success!
    • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Wednesday June 16 2021, @08:28PM

      by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Wednesday June 16 2021, @08:28PM (#1146101) Homepage
      Not at all. It's never been an issue to have the undesirable expensive (by whatever metric) thing as your fallback. Compare wired RAM and swap space. The point to maximise the use of the preferable one.
      --
      I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by Beryllium Sphere (r) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @09:03PM

      by Beryllium Sphere (r) (5062) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @09:03PM (#1146120)

      If Wikipedia is correct, Texas's power source breakdown is
      Coal (19.0%)
      Natural Gas (53.5%)
      Hydroelectric (0.3%)
      Wind (17.3%)
      Nuclear (8.6%)
      Biomass (0.3%)
      Solar (0.9%)
      Other (0.1%)

      That does not meet most definitions of "green", though natural gas does have advantages.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @03:11AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @03:11AM (#1146312)

      Not me, I'm not buying a generator. But I am buying stock in companies that make generators!

      Note to Texans: we have nice stable power up here near Niagara Falls.

  • (Score: 0, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @02:35PM (12 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @02:35PM (#1145913)

    In 2010, Texas had 25 million people.
    Just 10 years later, Texas had 29 million people.
    That's a 20% increase, and new power plants have not kept pace.
    Everybody is moving to Texas.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:02PM (9 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:02PM (#1145925)

      Now do California.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:41PM (5 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:41PM (#1145949)

        California has rolling blackouts and requests its residents not use power hungry devices during those times.
        California's population in 2010 was 37.3 million and in 2020 was 39.5 million, for an increase of only 5.9% in that time period versus Texas's 20%.

        California population figured taken from:
        https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/CA [census.gov]

        Not sure what you're trying to prove.

        • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:49PM (1 child)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @03:49PM (#1145958)

          Let me help. Ahem, everyone ls LEAVING the liberal socialist hellhole for wonderful America-loving Texas (not seceding this year apparently)!! Suck it up libs.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:04PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:04PM (#1145965)

            I never said that. Reading comprehension time, idiot. I said everyone was moving to Texas, and a growth rate of 20% makes that a defensible statement to plain English speakers. I never mentioned California. But, if you want to be superliteral about it, the population in Texas grew at a rate of 3-1/3 that of California. That's a huge difference not in California's favor for this discussion.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:18PM (2 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @05:18PM (#1146002)

          When California's annual rolling blackouts start this summer, maybe you'll understand what I'm trying to prove.

          Population is a factor, but a bigger factor is that US infrastructure is failing. Take note that neither Team Red or Blue is winning.

      • (Score: 2) by DeathMonkey on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:11PM (2 children)

        by DeathMonkey (1380) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:11PM (#1145968) Journal
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:32PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 16 2021, @04:32PM (#1145983)

          So, roughly, Texas's population grew 3 times as fast as California's during the same time period.

        • (Score: 2) by SunTzuWarmaster on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:03PM

          by SunTzuWarmaster (3971) on Wednesday June 16 2021, @06:03PM (#1146029)

          Just out of curiosity - why did you cite a link which says "Texas Population 2011-2022", compare it to the 2010 number of the grandfather poster, and insinuate that they are inaccurate?

          Let's go to the Census data rather than some macrotrends.com, shall we?
          April 2020 - https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/TX [census.gov]

          Texas Population 2010-2020 = 25145561-29145505 (16% increase)

          Seems pretty accurate to the claim of:
          "In 2010, Texas had 25 million people.
          Just 10 years later, Texas had 29 million people."

          Seems to dispute the claim that the GP made that it is a 20% increase, seeing as it is only 16%.

          https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/CA [census.gov]

          In 2010, CA had 37,253,956 people.
          Just 10 years later, CA had 39,538,223 people.

          CA Population 2010-2020 = 37,253,956-39,538,223 (6% increase).

    • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Thursday June 17 2021, @10:36AM (1 child)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday June 17 2021, @10:36AM (#1146415) Homepage Journal

      Everybody is moving to Texas.

      Mexico and Nicaragua are moving to Texas.

      --
      Taking bets: When does Biden's approval rating reach 15%?
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @03:15PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 17 2021, @03:15PM (#1146515)

        If it weren't for Third World immigration (I'll toss in China here too), the population of the US as a whole would be falling. Everyone from the Third World is moving here. And Biden is now *flying in the families* of the illegal aliens he invited in!

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