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posted by janrinok on Wednesday July 21, @03:49PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]

U.S. Life Expectancy Fell By 1.5 Years In 2020, The Biggest Drop Since WW II:

Life expectancy in the United States declined by a year and a half in 2020, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which says the coronavirus is largely to blame.

COVID-19 contributed to 74% of the decline in life expectancy from 78.8 years in 2019 to 77.3 years in 2020, according to the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.

It was the largest one-year decline since World War II, when life expectancy dropped by 2.9 years between 1942 and 1943. Hispanic and Black communities saw the biggest declines.

[...] "The range of factors that play into this include income inequality, the social safety net, as well as racial inequality and access to health care," Curtis said.


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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @04:25PM (12 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @04:25PM (#1158776)

    And thoughts.

    • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Revek on Wednesday July 21, @05:01PM (10 children)

      by Revek (5022) on Wednesday July 21, @05:01PM (#1158783)

      Prayer prevents critical thinking. So, no thoughts.

      --
      This page was generated by a Swarm of Roaming Elephants
      • (Score: 5, Insightful) by edIII on Wednesday July 21, @06:04PM (8 children)

        by edIII (791) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday July 21, @06:04PM (#1158815)

        As a spiritual non-atheist, non-agnostic, I disagree. I fervently pray all the time that the people who won't get vaccinated and wear masks employ critical thinking bereft of political and emotional interference.

        Spirituality and critical thinking, or logic and reason, are not mutually exclusive modalities in which to live your life.

        --
        Technically, lunchtime is at any moment. It's just a wave function.
        • (Score: 3, Interesting) by slinches on Wednesday July 21, @06:27PM (5 children)

          by slinches (5049) on Wednesday July 21, @06:27PM (#1158826)

          I agree that critical thinking and prayer are not mutually exclusive. However, the decision on covid vaccines and mask wearing are mostly political and emotional up to this point rather than rational regardless of which side of those debates you fall on. The only conclusion that I think can be firmly drawn from a rational evaluation of the available data at this point is that the vaccines are effective against covid and have low enough risk that those at elevated risk from covid (e.g. underlying conditions or 65+) should take them. And from what I can tell, the vaccination rates for that population are quite high (~90%) with the remaining population groups getting vaccinated at rates relatively proportional to their covid risk levels. So it seems to me like people are generally making rational, evidence based choices based on their own particular circumstances.

          • (Score: 2) by krishnoid on Wednesday July 21, @07:08PM (4 children)

            by krishnoid (1156) on Wednesday July 21, @07:08PM (#1158857)

            In some cases, mask wearing may be more driven by behavior or tendency [psychologytoday.com] than a decision. But if the article's correct ... we have a huge part of the US population with what would appear to be a pretty serious behavioral situation.

            • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @07:43PM (2 children)

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @07:43PM (#1158877)

              Yeah, living in the USA causes autism. It just happens to correlate with all the vaccinations they get. But it's actually caused by parents that won't control their spoiled brats

              • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:27PM (1 child)

                by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:27PM (#1158890)

                Autism is the new gay, to be condemned and corrected by therapy.

                • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 23, @03:09AM

                  by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 23, @03:09AM (#1159323)

                  Autism is the new gay

                  Both are forms of arrested development, failure to mature

            • (Score: 2) by slinches on Wednesday July 21, @07:59PM

              by slinches (5049) on Wednesday July 21, @07:59PM (#1158883)

              But if the article's correct ...

              That's a clickbait opinion article on Psychology Today. So, not correct at all beyond the references existing is a pretty safe bet.

        • (Score: 2) by Azuma Hazuki on Wednesday July 21, @08:59PM (1 child)

          by Azuma Hazuki (5086) on Wednesday July 21, @08:59PM (#1158906) Journal

          I don't know who modded you Troll for that. I'm in the same camp of "not an atheist, but not belonging to any one religion either" and don't see the problem there. Specific kinds of religion, like the Abrahamic ones, are definitely counter to critical thought, but believing there is a God isn't.

          --
          I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @02:00PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @02:00PM (#1159114)

            The problem is inherent to large organizations. Not even necessarily religious ones - think about Apple's notorious "reality distortion field." Or any number of non religious Republicans that keep insisting that covid isn't real.

            Rabbinic tradition is all about study and critical thinking. Most of the Hebrew Bible is written so that it is just difficult enough that you have to think about it to understand it.

            When Thomas doubted Jesus had been resurrected, Jesus told him to touch his body, feel his wounds. Almost all of the resurrection story - the most important thing in Christianity by far - is about people believing their eyes after seeing Jesus, when they knew he must be dead.

            Islam, honestly I don't know enough about the Koran.

            But the religion isn't against critical thinking. Only the churches have made it so, because their power on Earth depends on it.

      • (Score: 2) by Snotnose on Wednesday July 21, @08:24PM

        by Snotnose (1623) on Wednesday July 21, @08:24PM (#1158889)

        Prayer prevents critical thinking. So, no thoughts.

        I must be god because everytime I pray I'm talking to myself.

        --
        The 3 symptoms of laziness: 1) think of something tomorrow 2)
    • (Score: 2) by Opportunist on Wednesday July 21, @08:46PM

      by Opportunist (5545) on Wednesday July 21, @08:46PM (#1158900)

      More like sprayers and coughs.

  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @05:11PM (31 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @05:11PM (#1158788)

    >> "The range of factors that play into this include income inequality, the social safety net, as well as racial inequality and access to health care," Curtis said.

    Sure, blame it on the colored people. Race is a social construct, a mask would have saved your life no matter what color you are.

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by fakefuck39 on Wednesday July 21, @05:36PM (12 children)

      by fakefuck39 (6620) on Wednesday July 21, @05:36PM (#1158801)

      Race is a social construct, but there are differences in genetics too - not a lot, but they're there. For example, even when you compensate for income disparity and access to medical care, blacks have a much higher chance of dying from a heart attack. They also have a 40% higher chance of dying from covid. Now, a part of that 40% is most certainly because they're on average less well-off.

      Now, here's something interesting about that 40% extra for blacks. That number is from this site
      https://covidtracking.com/race [covidtracking.com]

      Let's compare that to CDC data
      https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/health-equity/racial-ethnic-disparities/disparities-deaths.html [cdc.gov]
      what we're looking at here is the difference between the red and blue bars.

      15.1% of deaths, while 12.5% of the population. That only shows an extra 2.6% extra deaths for blacks. Not 40% as covidtracking.com says. So what's the deal here?

      Now let's look at income inequality.
      https://www.federalreserve.gov/econres/notes/feds-notes/disparities-in-wealth-by-race-and-ethnicity-in-the-2019-survey-of-consumer-finances-20200928.htm [federalreserve.gov]

      Whites have a mean net worth 10x what the blacks do. But when you get admitted to a hospital, they have to take you whether you have money or not, and no doctor looks at your color or paystub. And if you can't pay it, you get medicaid. And if you didn't apply for medicaid, you still don't pay the hospital and just get sent to collections. You definitely don't get denied a ventilator or a bed or a doctor. Which makes sense - because the difference between blacks and whites dying of covid, is only 2.6%.

      It's funny they don't mention this in the article - that income inequality and race seem to not really matter at all. Well, they do I guess, to the grand total of 2.6%. But that doesn't make headlines or make people angry enough to riot, and we need our racial inequality riots, don't we.

      • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @06:04PM (3 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @06:04PM (#1158814)

        Fuckface fucks the numbers again. The 15.1% share of deaths is 20.8% more than the 12.5% population share, not 2.6%. It gets worse in the age-standardized distribution.

        • (Score: 0, Troll) by fakefuck39 on Wednesday July 21, @06:32PM (2 children)

          by fakefuck39 (6620) on Wednesday July 21, @06:32PM (#1158831)

          I'm sorry, what now? 12.5% of the population should have 12.5% share of the deaths. To get to 15.1%, their share of the population needs to increase by 2.6%, of the entire population. What you did here is change what I was talking about - % of population share increase, to "percent of growth of that subpopulation." Which is not what I was comparing. So you made up something and called this thing only you said stupid. You do that a lot. Probably because of your incurable autism.

          The reason we're not using the age-standardized graph here sherlock, is because we're comparing the first link to the second link, and while the second link shows both datasets, the first link only shows the non age standardized data. Fucking retard.

          • (Score: 0, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @07:26PM (1 child)

            by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @07:26PM (#1158870)

            15.1% is 2.6 basis points higher than 12.5%, but 15.1% is 20.8% higher than 12.5% - aka 12.5*1.208=15.1

            So that means blacks are dying at a rate 20.8% higher than their population numbers would indicate they should be.

            • (Score: 1, Troll) by fakefuck39 on Wednesday July 21, @07:49PM

              by fakefuck39 (6620) on Wednesday July 21, @07:49PM (#1158879)

              yes sherlock, (15.1-12.5)/12.5=20.8%. congratulations, you've clearly completed 8th grade.

              >but 15.1% is 20.8% higher than 12.5%
              yes, but you're comparing the wrong thing

              >So that means blacks are dying at a rate 20.8% higher than their population numbers
              which is comparing the black population baseline, to what the black population should be, if the population representation matched their covid death portion. which is not what we're talking about here. we are comparing it to the total population.

              now go back, read the original post, and reply on topic. In fact, the fist link clearly states what we're comparing, in the fucking title.

              but I get it. you're one of those people that doesn't even bother looking at what we're discussing, and just like to spam "gotchas" with preschool arithmetic. good for you. we all need to be entertained by people making fools of themselves.

      • (Score: 4, Informative) by Immerman on Wednesday July 21, @06:29PM (1 child)

        by Immerman (3985) on Wednesday July 21, @06:29PM (#1158828)

        Not commenting on anything but your own math error - that 2.6% is not the increase in rate at which blacks die - in fact I don't believe it tells you anything meaningful.

        As an extreme example - assume some group were only 0.01% of the population, but died at 10x the normal rate - they're such a small fraction of the population that they'd still only be about 0.1% of the total deaths (=0.01% of the population * 10x the death rate). Subtracting the two percentages as you did would get 0.09% - which by your logic would suggest that they were dying at almost the exact same rate as everyone else.

        To get the death rate compared to the average you need to divide by their fraction of the population, rather than subtract: 15.1%/12.5% = 1.208, or in other words assuming those numbers are accurate, they're dying at 20.8% higher rate than the average.

        Basically, to get the total death rate for a population from the subgroup death rates you'd have to add the proportional rates for each group, e.g.
        Group 1 size * group 1 rate
        + size 2 * rate 2 + ...
        + size N * rate N
          etc. = total number of deaths

        The same math works if you're dealing with percentages rather than absolute numbers - in that case you're essentially just pre-scaling all the sizes (and the total) to a representative population of size 100.

        • (Score: 2, Troll) by fakefuck39 on Wednesday July 21, @06:41PM

          by fakefuck39 (6620) on Wednesday July 21, @06:41PM (#1158837)

          hold on, I get your basic arithmetic, but we're comparing the two links here - that's the whole point of my comment. Did you look at the links? No, so let me paste this here:

          1st link:
          "Nationwide, Black people have died at 1,4 times the rate of white people."

          the numbers it lists are "Deaths per 100 000 people by race"

          those are not deaths that need to be standardized to the size of that group - the group size is already 100k people for any race. So why would "assume some group were only 0.01% of the population" matter, since the sample we're looking at is 100k for each race?

          >The same math works if you're dealing with percentages rather than absolute numbers
          you're doing that math twice. you're taking the number adjusted for that race's % of the total population, and adjusting it again.

      • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday July 22, @10:52AM (5 children)

        by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday July 22, @10:52AM (#1159085) Journal

        15.1% of deaths, while 12.5% of the population. That only shows an extra 2.6% extra deaths for blacks. Not 40% as covidtracking.com says. So what's the deal here?

        As you later acknowledge that was actually 20% greater deaths per capita than the mean (which in turn is somewhat greater than the white only deaths per capita. After all, per capita deaths is a better comparison right?

        What's missing here is that the black population as a whole is much more urban than the white population. While there are some occasional rural exceptions, the urban regions tend to be much more heavily hit than rural areas. Thus, even in the complete absence of any sort of racial bias, one would expect more covid deaths in the black population per capita.

        • (Score: 2) by fakefuck39 on Thursday July 22, @11:11AM (4 children)

          by fakefuck39 (6620) on Thursday July 22, @11:11AM (#1159088)

          >20% greater deaths per capita than the mean

          I acknowledge it in the way where I tell a retard that's not what the first link is talking about, since the title is comparing blacks to whites, not blacks to blacks.

          • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday July 22, @11:36AM (3 children)

            by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday July 22, @11:36AM (#1159093) Journal

            since the title is comparing blacks to whites, not blacks to the general population.

            FTFY.

            • (Score: 2) by fakefuck39 on Thursday July 22, @11:46AM (2 children)

              by fakefuck39 (6620) on Thursday July 22, @11:46AM (#1159095)

              you should fix yourself buddy. you are comparing blacks to blacks. I don't know how much more clear i can make that for you. it's clearly something your brain is unable to comprehend.

              • (Score: 0, Troll) by khallow on Thursday July 22, @12:34PM (1 child)

                by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday July 22, @12:34PM (#1159103) Journal

                you are comparing blacks to blacks.

                I've already corrected your incorrect statement. Time to get with it.

                I don't know how much more clear i can make that for you.

                Repetition doesn't make erroneous statements less erroneous.

                • (Score: 1, Troll) by fakefuck39 on Thursday July 22, @07:24PM

                  by fakefuck39 (6620) on Thursday July 22, @07:24PM (#1159191)

                  >I've already corrected your incorrect statement. Time to get with it.
                  autism

                  >Repetition doesn't make erroneous statements less erroneous.
                  is not curable

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @06:08PM (17 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @06:08PM (#1158817)

      > Race is a social construct

      No data, but along with the social construct comes differences in services. Just a guess, but the hospitals that serve our minority populations (in USA) may not offer the same actual level of care that suburban hospitals offer?

      This is certainly true for grocery stores and other kinds of stores--the inner city stores don't have nearly the same quality/variety of food and goods as can be found out in the wealthier and whiter burbs.

      • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @06:14PM (16 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @06:14PM (#1158821)

        Businesses (both grocery stores and hospitals) can better take the risk of providing additional goods and services in areas filled with people who pay their bills and don't steal, than in areas filled with people who don't pay their bills and do steal.

        • (Score: -1, Spam) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @06:47PM (6 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @06:47PM (#1158842)

          No businesses or other customers should have to deal with blacks. They are a burden that is not ours to bear. send them back home so Whitey can't oppress them.

          • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Azuma Hazuki on Wednesday July 21, @07:41PM (5 children)

            by Azuma Hazuki (5086) on Wednesday July 21, @07:41PM (#1158876) Journal

            Pop quiz, fuccboi! Who brought them to the US in the first place?

            --
            I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
            • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @07:51PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @07:51PM (#1158880)

              That is the worst troll feeding I've ever seen Azuma, and you left the racist gate wide open.

            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:30PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:30PM (#1158892)

              Let me guess... the White savior? Saving civilization with his superior knowledge of pickup trucks.

            • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:52PM (2 children)

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:52PM (#1158904)

              Jews, mostly, but you already knew that.

              Go on, then. Spam me, baby!

              • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday July 22, @11:41AM (1 child)

                by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday July 22, @11:41AM (#1159094) Journal

                Jews, mostly, but you already knew that.

                Given how capable Jews are, one wonders why we bother having any other ethnicities at all.

                So what of all the other ethnicities involved in the slave trade? Do they not count if there are Jew cooties around?

        • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:27PM (8 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:27PM (#1158891)

          Businesses (both grocery stores and hospitals) can better take the risk of providing additional goods and services in areas filled with people who pay their bills and don't steal, than in areas filled with people who don't pay their bills and do steal.

          Not to mention the risk of businesses getting looted and burned to the ground, like what can happen when there are "mostly peaceful" protests.

          • (Score: 2) by Azuma Hazuki on Wednesday July 21, @09:01PM (7 children)

            by Azuma Hazuki (5086) on Wednesday July 21, @09:01PM (#1158909) Journal

            True, but I reckon the first group--you know, the vulture capitalist types like Bain Capital and all the other "equity" firms?--do a lot more damage overall. We can deal with the looting on the ground after we go after the Romneys and Trumps of the world, I say.

            --
            I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @09:34PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @09:34PM (#1158923)

              The ecosystem functions better when you have animals, plants, fungi and blood-sucking parasites all in balance. The Romneys and Trumps, like ticks, provide a repository for viruses and bacteria that would otherwise be lost, harming diversity.

            • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday July 22, @10:56AM (5 children)

              by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday July 22, @10:56AM (#1159086) Journal

              True, but I reckon the first group--you know, the vulture capitalist types like Bain Capital and all the other "equity" firms?--do a lot more damage overall.

              I think you probably ought to try to show that the vulture capitals do "damage" overall. For a glaring example of how this reckoning fails, I doubt the entirety of the vulture capitalist ecosystem has done as much damage as the 1967 Detroit riots.

              • (Score: 2) by Azuma Hazuki on Thursday July 22, @05:39PM (4 children)

                by Azuma Hazuki (5086) on Thursday July 22, @05:39PM (#1159167) Journal

                Okay, but your gut feelings mean shit. Numbers. Back up that claim or shut the fuck up.

                --
                I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
                • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @10:48PM (2 children)

                  by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @10:48PM (#1159268)

                  What can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence. If you want numbers so bad, why don't you start?

                  • (Score: 2, Insightful) by Azuma Hazuki on Friday July 23, @01:22AM (1 child)

                    by Azuma Hazuki (5086) on Friday July 23, @01:22AM (#1159302) Journal

                    You make the claim, you back it up.

                    --
                    I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
                    • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 23, @08:42PM

                      by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 23, @08:42PM (#1159474)

                      Looking forward to you backing up your claim [soylentnews.org], then.

                      You've got no room to complain about people contradicting you when they provided just as much evidence as you (0=0), you toxic little dingbat.

                • (Score: 1) by khallow on Monday July 26, @01:00AM

                  by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Monday July 26, @01:00AM (#1159870) Journal

                  Numbers. Back up that claim or shut the fuck up.

                  How about this? No city has dropped in population by almost a factor of three due to vulture capitalists. In fact, if someone had been recycling dying capital and property back in the 1960s and 1970s, Detroit might be in a lot better shape now (abandoned property is a large contributor to the problems of Detroit today).

                  While Detroit has been in decline [biggestuscities.com] since 1950, there were two decades in which Detroit lost 20% or more of its population (as measured by the US Census). The first was 1970-1980 when it dropped from 1.5 million to 1.2 million, right after those 1967 riots. (The second was 2000-2010 when it dropped from over 900k to a bit over 700k.)

                  Even more telling, the Detroit metropolitan area peaked in 1970 (with a second, lower peak in 2000). That coincides well with the riots and their aftereffects.

  • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Wednesday July 21, @05:15PM (15 children)

    by JoeMerchant (3937) on Wednesday July 21, @05:15PM (#1158790)

    Excess deaths in the U.S. - it's like a bad flu season, but worse:

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/01/14/us/covid-19-death-toll.html [nytimes.com]

    --
    My karma ran over your dogma.
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by slinches on Wednesday July 21, @05:33PM (7 children)

      by slinches (5049) on Wednesday July 21, @05:33PM (#1158800)

      The CDC is still tracking it here:

      https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid19/excess_deaths.htm [cdc.gov]

      • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Wednesday July 21, @06:12PM (6 children)

        by JoeMerchant (3937) on Wednesday July 21, @06:12PM (#1158820)

        Weekly counts of deaths by age group is a great one. Are the declining deaths in the older age groups in 2021 because so many died last year, or because of generally safer behavior post pandemic?

        --
        My karma ran over your dogma.
        • (Score: 2) by slinches on Wednesday July 21, @06:37PM (3 children)

          by slinches (5049) on Wednesday July 21, @06:37PM (#1158834)

          Yeah, that really illustrates the non-uniformity of risk across age groups. The effect on deaths for those under 45 is almost undetectable with massive spikes over the already higher base rates in older groups.

          • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Wednesday July 21, @07:54PM (2 children)

            by JoeMerchant (3937) on Wednesday July 21, @07:54PM (#1158881)

            The number of deaths 25-45 is still low, but percentage wise it has increased significantly. In other words, people in that age group were about twice as likely to die as normal during 2021...

            --
            My karma ran over your dogma.
            • (Score: 2) by slinches on Wednesday July 21, @08:17PM (1 child)

              by slinches (5049) on Wednesday July 21, @08:17PM (#1158888)

              True, but it seems to me that the data suggests most of the rise in the 25-45 range is likely not directly due to covid. The increase doesn't correlate with the spikes in cases for each wave. Rather, it's more of a uniform increase in the baseline which would correlate better with the lockdown actions and changes in behavior associated with the public response to the pandemic.

              • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Wednesday July 21, @08:50PM

                by JoeMerchant (3937) on Wednesday July 21, @08:50PM (#1158902)

                Yep, that seems a likely explanation... judging by the way people started driving around here I'm not surprised - very few people on the road, but the ones who were out were nutso.

                --
                My karma ran over your dogma.
        • (Score: 2) by ChrisMaple on Thursday July 22, @02:16AM (1 child)

          by ChrisMaple (6964) on Thursday July 22, @02:16AM (#1158993)

          Combination of factors. The grim reaper took the weakest elders in 2020. In 2021, old people are the most vaccinated.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @04:06AM

            by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @04:06AM (#1159018)

            Misread elders=editors

    • (Score: 1, Flamebait) by Barenflimski on Wednesday July 21, @06:44PM (6 children)

      by Barenflimski (6836) on Wednesday July 21, @06:44PM (#1158840)

      Where do the 80,000 drug overdoses due to lockdown's fit into this?

      • (Score: 5, Touché) by JoeMerchant on Wednesday July 21, @06:58PM (1 child)

        by JoeMerchant (3937) on Wednesday July 21, @06:58PM (#1158849)

        Right up there with AIDS deaths... a good start. /s

        Oh, I forgot, since Rush L. came out as addicted now we have to acknowledge that human beings also can become addicted to drugs, not just degenerates.

        --
        My karma ran over your dogma.
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @09:37PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @09:37PM (#1158924)

          since Rush L. came out as addicted now we have to acknowledge that human beings also can become addicted to drugs, not just degenerates.

          Oh, wait...

      • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Wednesday July 21, @07:01PM (1 child)

        by JoeMerchant (3937) on Wednesday July 21, @07:01PM (#1158852)

        The increase in overdoses was only 22,500 compared to the 12 months prior:

        https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2020/p1218-overdose-deaths-covid-19.html [cdc.gov]

        --
        My karma ran over your dogma.
      • (Score: 2) by Opportunist on Wednesday July 21, @09:52PM

        by Opportunist (5545) on Wednesday July 21, @09:52PM (#1158931)

        Like you weren't bored in the lockdown...

      • (Score: 2, Troll) by fakefuck39 on Wednesday July 21, @10:49PM

        by fakefuck39 (6620) on Wednesday July 21, @10:49PM (#1158938)

        So the 75,000 OD deaths the year before the pandemic would not have happened in 2020, because jesus would have stopped them. The 70,000 OD deaths in 2018 would not have happened either, because orange god, father of jesus would have stopped them.

        Hey sherlock holmes, the 80,000 deaths would fit into a chart from 2019. A chart that predicts 2020 deaths using the previous OD increases.

        They're as much due to lockdown as the alcohol your mother drank while pregnant was due to the spanish flu.

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Rich on Wednesday July 21, @07:58PM (33 children)

    by Rich (945) on Wednesday July 21, @07:58PM (#1158882) Journal

    Could it be that the Russians drink themselves to death, while the USAians do so by eating?

    I dug out the first BMI development statistic I could find on the internet. Entirely non scientific, but might be a hint to start further investigation. Range from 1980 to 2008. For 1980 it indicates 25.1 for Germany+Belgium, and 25.3 for the US. For 2008, Germany+Belgium have climbed to 26.2, while the US shot up to 28.3. The growth looked pretty linear. I found another article on the Lancet site (spanning 1975 to 2014), where the "high income english speaking countries" opened up a similar gap.

    A correlation between overweightness and morbidity is established, so even aside from CoViD and social factors decreasing life expectancy should be expected. And at least simple reasoning would suggest that the promotion "body positiveness" in recent years is not going to change that trend.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:30PM (3 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:30PM (#1158893)

      And at least simple reasoning would suggest that the promotion "body positiveness" in recent years is not going to change that trend.

      Impossible. People are "Healthy At Every Size" and anyone who dares to suggest otherwise is clearly a bigot.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:39PM (2 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:39PM (#1158897)

        I've seen some extra-healthy Americans driving around in mobility scooters. They're so healthy they can't even waddle around on their own anymore. Mmm... Big Macs.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @09:38PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @09:38PM (#1158927)

          Paid for by tax dollars... particuarly galling when they wheel up to the microphone and bitch about Obamacare.

        • (Score: 2) by Rich on Thursday July 22, @05:55PM

          by Rich (945) on Thursday July 22, @05:55PM (#1159170) Journal

          When I was little, I read a story where Donald Duck and his tribe (only Uncle Sam himself would be more US-American) stumble upon a degenerate population that relied on such scooters to get around. IiRC, something with the scooters screwed up. The Ducktowners educated them to exercise and that population excitedly celebrated their freedom from the scooters.

          How things have changed.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:36PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 21, @08:36PM (#1158895)

      Don't forget to take your Brain Force Plus supplements, kids. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGAAhzreGWw [youtube.com]

    • (Score: 2) by Pav on Thursday July 22, @01:42AM (15 children)

      by Pav (114) on Thursday July 22, @01:42AM (#1158983)

      Most of the rest of the developed world taxes "empty" sugar and carbs, funds public school sports programs, encourages pedestrians and the use of bicycles by their infrastructure choices, and have stronger labour laws so people actually have time and can afford to exercise should they want to (obesity is associated with poverty). For whatever reason the anglosphere is much more hands-off... particularly the USA, UK and (until recently) New Zealand. My own country (Australia) was also stating to move in a more positive direction but things have stalled for over a decade because of the current government.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @04:11AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @04:11AM (#1159023)

        Who the hell taxes empty carbs? I could fly to any part of the world and feast on empty carbs for less than it costs in Los Angeles to get an Uber to McDonalds.

      • (Score: 0, Flamebait) by khallow on Thursday July 22, @11:17AM (13 children)

        by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday July 22, @11:17AM (#1159089) Journal
        I notice that the US has done the first two on your list. New York City isn't healthier now due to that empty calorie nannying, for example.

        encourages pedestrians and the use of bicycles by their infrastructure choices

        And of course, bragging about screwing up one's transportation infrastructure.

        For whatever reason the anglosphere is much more hands-off... particularly the USA, UK and (until recently) New Zealand.

        Probably because the "anglosphere" is more democratic.

        • (Score: 4, Interesting) by Pav on Thursday July 22, @12:27PM (11 children)

          by Pav (114) on Thursday July 22, @12:27PM (#1159102)

          I suppose, technically, if one builds a state media apparatus [foreignpolicy.com] around ones citizens and they vote (with a few [wikipedia.org] exceptions [wikipedia.org]) for the "right people" it's a democracy. It's certainly better than the democratic "rule by the poor" Socrates complained so bitterly about in ancient times, and instead simulates Socrates' ideal of "rule by philosopher kings". How's that working out?

          As an aside a while back my (Iranian) partner couldn't believe the USA had five years less average lifespan than the country in which we live (Australia), so she looked it up... she's a bit of a data nerd. Iranians generally have a pretty positive view of the US and the west in general and hate their own regime, though don't want a US puppet regime either but that's the only other option that seems available. This choice has actually discouraged revolution until now... although the sanctions are biting REALLY bad just at the moment... worse than they have for decades (with protests, blackouts, water infrastructure failure, medical shortages etc...). My partner fully expected US lifespans to be right up there. Apparently in the short time since I'd looked it up the delta between Australia and the US lifespans had actually grown from 5 to 7 years, with the US numbers being pretty similar to Iran. She was pretty horrified, and said she gave more credence to what a US-based friend had been telling her for years. She knows a lot of bright expat engineers and mathematicians from her time at Isfahan university who've subsequently travelled all over the world... the Field Medalist Maryam Mirzakhani [wikipedia.org] wasn't directly known to her, but she was known to a couple of her friends.

          • (Score: 0, Flamebait) by khallow on Thursday July 22, @12:50PM (10 children)

            by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday July 22, @12:50PM (#1159107) Journal

            I suppose, technically, if one builds a state media apparatus [foreignpolicy.com] around ones citizens

            The obvious rebuttal is that's a false supposition. There's a lot of frothing in that article, but where's the evidence that anyone is listening to that state media apparatus? I might have missed some large example, but here's what your linked story came up with:

            This partially explains the push to allow BBG broadcasts on local radio stations in the United States. The agency wants to reach diaspora communities, such as St. Paul, Minnesota’s significant Somali expat community. "Those people can get al-Shabab, they can get Russia Today, but they couldn’t get access to their taxpayer-funded news sources like VOA Somalia," the source said. "It was silly."

            They're reaching a "significant" community in the US somewhere. Not the scale you're claiming. And of course, we have the usual anti-democratic handwringing over people voting the wrong way.

            It's certainly better than the democratic "rule by the poor" Socrates complained so bitterly about in ancient times, and instead simulates Socrates' ideal of "rule by philosopher kings". How's that working out?

            There was justice. Plato's ideal of "rule by philosopher kings" ended up with Plato wasting a lot of his life trying to pursue that ideal.

            Throughout his later life, Plato became entangled with the politics of the city of Syracuse. According to Diogenes Laërtius, Plato initially visited Syracuse while it was under the rule of Dionysius.[58] During this first trip Dionysius's brother-in-law, Dion of Syracuse, became one of Plato's disciples, but the tyrant himself turned against Plato. Plato almost faced death, but he was sold into slavery.[g] Anniceris, a Cyrenaic philosopher, subsequently bought Plato's freedom for twenty minas,[60] and sent him home. After Dionysius's death, according to Plato's Seventh Letter, Dion requested Plato return to Syracuse to tutor Dionysius II and guide him to become a philosopher king. Dionysius II seemed to accept Plato's teachings, but he became suspicious of Dion, his uncle. Dionysius expelled Dion and kept Plato against his will. Eventually Plato left Syracuse. Dion would return to overthrow Dionysius and ruled Syracuse for a short time before being usurped by Calippus, a fellow disciple of Plato.

            • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Pav on Thursday July 22, @09:47PM (9 children)

              by Pav (114) on Thursday July 22, @09:47PM (#1159245)

              You might want to start with the new revolving door that has opened up between "journalism" and the three letter agencies - it's in their bio's... it's not like they're hiding it. As for circumstantial evidence, I bet you haven't even heard of eg. the OPCW leaks... which appears to have shown up a false flag ie. the Douma gas attack in Syria. At least you would have heard about the problems with the "weapons of mass destruction" narrative a generation or so ago. The OPCW inspectors on the ground in Syria didn't see evidence of a chemical attack, and whistleblew against the OPCW when their report was doctored to show the opposite. After comparing the original interim report, the released OPCW report, and parsing that with their own expertise and what is publicly known many third party academics have come out in support... MIT Professor Ted Postol has been the most vocal, and has also collaborated on a paper on the suspect nature of the supposed gas attack in Khan Shekoun, Syria. There have even been UN hearings about this... but UTTER SILENCE in mainstream media. The Julian Assange, Edward Snowden etc... message seems to have been absorbed. And it's not just US three letter agencies - Luke Harding (MI6 guy) was the origin of the (since debunked) Russiagate. In my own country (Australia) the feds have been intimidating the Australian Broadcasting Corporation eg. the raid and confuscation of computers in an attempt to out the Afghanistan war crimes whistleblowers. New Zealand is wanting to exit the Five Eyes because of this and other un-democratic BS.

              • (Score: 2) by Pav on Saturday July 24, @11:40PM

                by Pav (114) on Saturday July 24, @11:40PM (#1159669)

                For some catharsis here's one of the few consistent US left wing voices raging on tech censorship [youtube.com] in particular (and calling out his own side of politics).

              • (Score: 0, Troll) by khallow on Sunday July 25, @04:10AM (7 children)

                by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Sunday July 25, @04:10AM (#1159707) Journal
                So no evidence for your state media apparatus red herring. I won't bother keeping up with your wandering, non sequitur narratives (again! [soylentnews.org]. I'm not here to defend every evil deed someone has ever done. Keep in mind that we started with your comments about taxing empty carbs, funding public school sports, encouraging human-powered daily transportation, and stronger labor laws.

                And we ended up here.
                • (Score: 2) by Pav on Sunday July 25, @03:39PM (6 children)

                  by Pav (114) on Sunday July 25, @03:39PM (#1159772)

                  It's not my fault you bristle at what's been obvious for years to pretty much everyone else in America [poynter.org] (well 70ish percent anyway). Media censorship is done and dusted, and that was achieved two... TWO administrations ago. Todays Whitehouse is so past that they're now on to talking about censoring private messages [riotimesonline.com] - get with the program!

                  And I'm not sure why you ignored the on-topic majority of my post just to argue against the sky being blue.

                  • (Score: 0, Redundant) by khallow on Monday July 26, @12:07AM (5 children)

                    by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Monday July 26, @12:07AM (#1159864) Journal
                    The problem here is that your arguments are an endless waterfall of non sequiturs. Notice what has been introduced here merely to discuss a mild drop in US life expectancy due to covid:

                    Most of the rest of the developed world taxes "empty" sugar and carbs, funds public school sports programs, encourages pedestrians and the use of bicycles by their infrastructure choices, and have stronger labour laws so people actually have time and can afford to exercise should they want to (obesity is associated with poverty).

                    I suppose, technically, if one builds a state media apparatus [foreignpolicy.com] around ones citizens and they vote (with a few [wikipedia.org] exceptions [wikipedia.org]) for the "right people" it's a democracy.

                    You might want to start with the new revolving door that has opened up between "journalism" and the three letter agencies [...] the OPCW leaks [...] And it's not just US three letter agencies - Luke Harding (MI6 guy) was the origin of the (since debunked) Russiagate. [...] In my own country (Australia) the feds have been intimidating the Australian Broadcasting Corporation

                    And the latest gibberish:

                    Todays Whitehouse is so past that they're now on to talking about censoring private messages

                    What's really peculiar about your complaints is how frivolous they are. Your state doesn't have empty calorie taxes? So what? Minor changes in the US government's official media apparatus? No reason to care there. There's a journalist who used to be a spook or vice versa? Well, there's a lot of overlap in skill sets between those two careers and contrary to your assertion, the "new" revolving door is centuries old. I'm not feeling a need to regulate peoples' life choices here any more than I was with the sugar, exercise, etc.

                    Assad is allegedly getting slandered by the OPCW because the chemical attack in question might not have come from him? Oh dear, let's serenade his sorrow with the microviolins. I notice that little has come out of this hubbub. Assad is still the largest power in Syria.

                    Finally, there's no evidence of the alleged plan to censor private messages. The whole story you linked is spun from a misinterpreted Politico story and goes downhill from there.

                    • (Score: 2) by Pav on Monday July 26, @02:30PM (4 children)

                      by Pav (114) on Monday July 26, @02:30PM (#1160003)

                      Apparently your brainwashing can't countenance the fact US life expectancy was dropping year on year before COVID. Of course the linked Smithsonian Magazine article can't appear to apportion any blame to bad healthcare up front... but solely on gun ownership causing suicides in rural areas, and on drug use, therefore upholding their half of the state media apparatus (remember children... what 70% of Americans mistrust and naively call (the key word) "partisan" is the very definition of state media [wikipedia.org]. Because the magazine must also maintain its academic pretensions it burys important details. For anyone studious enough to read the actual article they'll find out US healthcare is so bad that of the top 10 causes of death—heart disease, cancer, unintentional injuries, chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, influenza and pneumonia, kidney disease, and suicide... only cancer witnessed a decrease in mortality rates... seven others increased. Preventative care (the most cost effective healthcare) is "frivolous" according to khallow, as is decent after-the-fact healtcare apparently. Regarding SMS censorship the Politifact article wasn't specific - saying that SMS censorship is not meant for individuals is gaslighting... surely you're not THAT politically naive. But it's unambiguous that they're looking to build censorship in. If your boiled-frog-patriotism makes you think that once the capability is there they won't find a way to justify using it nefariously and/or on individuals, then good for you.

                      • (Score: 2) by Pav on Monday July 26, @09:25PM

                        by Pav (114) on Monday July 26, @09:25PM (#1160164)

                        Ooops... the "linked Smithsonian article" wasn't, but now is [smithsonianmag.com].

                      • (Score: 1) by khallow on Tuesday July 27, @05:47AM (2 children)

                        by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday July 27, @05:47AM (#1160292) Journal
                        So now you've introduced Smithsonian articles, gun ownership, and babble about healthcare. I think the problem here is that you don't know how to argue a point, instead always migrating to safe ground. Sorry, I'm just not interested. I'm not here for your pet points, especially when you show signs that you have your own problems that are just as bad (such as advocating for taxes on empty calories - which indicates a dysfunctional expectation that government is going to fix moral and behavioral problems, like much of the list you were complaining about, such as the OPCW thing).
                        • (Score: 2) by Pav on Tuesday July 27, @12:44PM (1 child)

                          by Pav (114) on Tuesday July 27, @12:44PM (#1160334)

                          You expect to lose, so you do... and you rage against people who don't accept that kind of thing. This is not a good habit.

                          • (Score: 1) by khallow on Tuesday July 27, @01:46PM

                            by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday July 27, @01:46PM (#1160344) Journal
                            And a lot of trash talk too. Look, I'm not here to debate the entirety of bad US policy every time you post something that I disagree with.
        • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @03:07PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @03:07PM (#1159129)

          Yeah, taxing sugar and the like doesn't really do anything if people don't have access to healthy food and know how to make makes that they actually like with it.

          What's more, the diet alternatives aren't necessarily any better. In mist cases the substitution they make to be healthy make them no better.

    • (Score: 2) by Dr Spin on Thursday July 22, @06:57AM (2 children)

      by Dr Spin (5239) on Thursday July 22, @06:57AM (#1159059)

      the "high income english speaking countries" opened up a similar gap.

      The obvious inference is that speaking English kills. (Do the math)

      You all need to start learning Spanish right now!

      --
      Warning: Opening your mouth may invalidate your brain!
      • (Score: 2) by Rich on Thursday July 22, @03:56PM (1 child)

        by Rich (945) on Thursday July 22, @03:56PM (#1159136) Journal

        The obvious inference is that speaking English kills. (Do the math)

        Oh, that's a bit far fetched. The direct correlation would be that speaking English makes you fat.

        Ich schreibe also lieber mal auf Deutsch weiter, um nicht zuzunehmen. :)

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @05:46PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @05:46PM (#1159168)

          Ich schreibe also lieber mal auf Deutsch weiter, um nicht zuzunehmen. :)

          That doesn't save you. Plenty of fat germans around. The only difference is morbid-obesity is not so advanced outside America.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by dak664 on Thursday July 22, @02:48PM (8 children)

      by dak664 (2433) on Thursday July 22, @02:48PM (#1159127)

      COVID mortality correlates with low 25-hydroxy-vitamin D blood levels, below 20 ng/ml. The liver makes that from vitamin D3 which is made in the deepest layer of the epidermis upon exposure to ultraviolet-B. However UV-B damages most cells so indigenous peoples develop skin pigment that gives just enough D3 for immune health.

      Direct consequences are 1) COVID peaks in the winter months, 2) Dark-skinned people living in less sunny climates have greater mortality 3) People spending most of the time indoors have greater mortality, 4) Obese people have greater mortality (D3 is fat soluable so it takes more sunlight to bring up the blood levels), 5) People with reduced kidney and liver function (e.g. >65 years old) have greater mortality (the kidneys activate the circulating 25-hydroxy D into the form that regulates the immune system)

      But the narrative is, there is nothing you can do to prevent COVID other than being vaccinated. As long as the media is in lock-step with big pharma captured regulatory agencies, needless deaths will continue to mount.

      • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @05:58PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 22, @05:58PM (#1159171)

        So, what you are saying is that the poor in India just happened to be able to afford that sun screen? Or suddenly they don't get any sun because they live in their giant 200sq.ft. houses? Or were they morbidly obese? I mean, which one resulted in the recent overrun of hospitals and O2 shortages?

        there is nothing you can do to prevent COVID other than being vaccinated

        That's BS. You can also stay away from other people - works against all other viral infections too. But if you are unwilling to stay away from humanity in general, yes, vaccine is the only to reduce your chance of dying. Like you know, that polio thing or measles or that whooping cough or maybe tetanus or rubella. They also were lock-step in that big pharma?

        https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-humber-57921768 [bbc.com]

        Tough to be that guy I guess. If only he read your comments and got educated on that Vitamin D thing...

      • (Score: 2, Insightful) by Azuma Hazuki on Friday July 23, @01:27AM (6 children)

        by Azuma Hazuki (5086) on Friday July 23, @01:27AM (#1159303) Journal

        Why not both?

        I got 2x Pfizer shot, and take 4000IU of D3 (and 400mg of magnesium as glycinate complex with it) daily. And also drink ginger tea and cook with turmeric + black pepper and cayenne on a regular basis. Covid appears to do damage by injuring vascular epithelium; ergo, keeping a strong immune response, cooking with foods that thin the blood, and being vaccinated should, all together, provide the most possible protection. I'm not exactly young, I'll be 33 in a couple of weeks, but this looks about as good as it gets.

        --
        I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
        • (Score: 1, Touché) by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 23, @09:54AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 23, @09:54AM (#1159379)

          I remember the days when 33 qualified as "not exactly young." At least I can on good days ... usually.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 23, @05:07PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 23, @05:07PM (#1159431)

          Stock car flaming with the loser in the cruise control
          Baby's in Reno with the vitamin D
          Got a couple of couches, sleep on the loveseat
          Someone came, saying I'm insane to complain

          - Beck, Loser [genius.com]

          --
          DJT should use this tune at his rallies.

        • (Score: 3, Interesting) by dak664 on Saturday July 24, @11:09AM (3 children)

          by dak664 (2433) on Saturday July 24, @11:09AM (#1159543)

          While I have no medical license I do have some knowledge of cell biology and first-hand experience with covid and the aftereffects. As I understand it there is a viral phase, easily overcome by most people, followed by the removal of infected cells by various mechanisms, which is a bitch if that involves most of your lung epithelium. For me it was two weeks of leather lung, gasping for air after a few minutes off the oxygen concentrator.

          On the last day of oxygen I developed parethesia in my feet and swelling from the knees down. That lasted for six months and only recently has begin resolving. The timing was interesting - the immune system was done with the infected cells and perhaps turned to other issues. My take is the antibodies to the covid spike protein can also attack normal cells, i.e. long covid is an autoimmune response. If so the last thing you want is a vaccine that boosts spike antibodies. Antibodies drop after six months for good reason!

          I won't be having the vaccine, thank you very much. Incidentally, ivermectin every 10 days gave symptomatic relief. YMMV but the risks are minimal.

          • (Score: 2) by Azuma Hazuki on Sunday July 25, @04:23PM (2 children)

            by Azuma Hazuki (5086) on Sunday July 25, @04:23PM (#1159781) Journal

            It's very interesting that ivermectin provided you symptomatic relief. The stuff is specifically targeted at *invertebrate* organisms, and works by holding open the glutamate-gated chloride channels common to their physiology, hyperpolarizing their cells. P-glycoprotein keeps it from crossing the human blood-brain barrier, which is a good thing since IIRC that's the only place in human physiology where analogous receptors are found.

            In theory there is no mammalian *or* viral target for this...so what, exactly, is it doing? I am not aware of any immunomodulatory or anti-inflammatory effects of ivermetcin, and from what I've read its antiviral effects would only become relevant at hideously toxic doses.

            --
            I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
            • (Score: 3, Interesting) by dak664 on Monday July 26, @10:02AM (1 child)

              by dak664 (2433) on Monday July 26, @10:02AM (#1159960)

              A recent paper lists 20 possible antiviral mechanisms.
              https://www.nature.com/articles/s41429-021-00430-5 [nature.com]

              In my case I think the autoimmune response is stifled by binding to both ACE-2 receptors and spike protein analogs. The relief occurs over 3-4 hours, a bit too rapid for antiplatelet effects. Of course there could be several things going on at once.

              You quote that standard objection to IVM, that toxic levels would be needed for any effect. That initial observation was in cultured mouse cells. It was repeated with human lung tissue and found effective at usual anti-parasite doses. Big pharma graps at any straws to discredit IVM, which is probably safer than aspirin. If IVM would be found effective against influenza their vaccine profits would plummet. Or any of the cheap antivirals showing effect against covid, which they are busily trying to slightly modify so they can get patents and charge through the nose.

              Incidentally July 24 was World Ivermectin Day. It was not widely reported in mainstream media but a big deal on the internet.
              https://trialsitenews.com/world-ivermectin-day-news-views-and-more-1/ [trialsitenews.com]

              • (Score: 2) by Azuma Hazuki on Tuesday July 27, @07:27PM

                by Azuma Hazuki (5086) on Tuesday July 27, @07:27PM (#1160433) Journal

                Fascinating. I had no idea this worked this well and may very well encourage my idiot anti-vax brother to get some (if he hasn't already) since he insists on not getting the shots. I've already got him following the same vitamin and mineral protocol I use and taking ginger tea daily, so if this really works, it might save his idiot life.

                --
                I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
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