Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

posted by martyb on Tuesday August 24 2021, @02:43AM   Printer-friendly
from the it's-worth-a-shot! dept.

Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine wins full approval from the FDA:

Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine is now fully approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, making it the first shot against the coronavirus to get all the way through the regulatory review.

The FDA on Monday approved the mRNA vaccine against COVID-19 developed by Pfizer and its partner BioNTech for two doses, given three weeks apart, in people 16 years of age and older. The vaccine was previously being given under an emergency use authorization, which is still in place for the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines.

"While this and other vaccines have met the FDA's rigorous, scientific standards for emergency use authorization, as the first FDA-approved COVID-19 vaccine, the public can be very confident that this vaccine meets the high standards for safety, effectiveness, and manufacturing quality the FDA requires of an approved product," said acting FDA Commissioner Janet Woodcock in a release. "Today's milestone puts us one step closer to altering the course of this pandemic in the US."

Full approval is expected to make it easier for local governments, schools and businesses to require vaccinations and may encourage people who are hesitant to get a shot. Three in 10 unvaccinated adults said they'd be more likely to get a vaccine if one moved from emergency authorization to full approval by the FDA, according to a June poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

[...] The Pfizer vaccine will now be marketed as Comirnaty, said the FDA.

Also at Washington Post and CNN.


Original Submission

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
(1)
  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:02AM (26 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:02AM (#1170129)

    Grabbing popcorn and watching goalposts move along...

    Three in 10 unvaccinated adults said they'd be more likely to get a vaccine if one moved from emergency authorization to full approval by the FDA

    • (Score: -1, Disagree) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:53AM (19 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:53AM (#1170147)

      The thing is that the least vaccinated group is the most democratic leaning.

      https://youtu.be/nA1xcGlYx3Y?t=169 [youtu.be]

      The MSM tries to blame Fox news for vaccine hesitancy but very few people, overall, watch fox news and how many of the unvaccinated really watch Fox news (and while, sure, sometimes Fox news may have irresponsible segments just like CNN does the fact of matter is that, overall, Fox news is not anti-vax so it's disingenuous, at best, for the MSM to blame Fox news for vaccine hesitancy).

      So the left media needs to stop trying to blame the right for everything that everyone does wrong just because it's politically convenient to do so.

      • (Score: 3, Informative) by Beryllium Sphere (r) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:46AM (9 children)

        by Beryllium Sphere (r) (5062) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:46AM (#1170164)

        >Fox news is not anti-vax

        I'll hear you out on that, but please provide evidence that Tucker Carlson and Laura Ingraham do not exist.

        This is what Fox is saying: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/11/business/media/vaccines-fox-news-hosts.html [nytimes.com]

        • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:16AM (8 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:16AM (#1170171)

          No, that's what the legal profession calls hearsay. It is not admissible as evidence anywhere. To prove Fox is saying antivax things you need to link to Fox saying them.

          eg. I could say "Beryllium Sphere thinks the world is flat."
          Linking to such a post would provide no evidence whatsoever as to your beliefs on the flatness of the world.

          • (Score: 5, Insightful) by FatPhil on Tuesday August 24 2021, @12:16PM (5 children)

            by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Tuesday August 24 2021, @12:16PM (#1170286) Homepage
            Things that are generally accepted as factual don't need to be accompanied by up-front support: they're, literally, taken as read. Are TC & LI disputing that they've said these things on Fox News? Are Fox? Is anyone?

            Apart from you, that is. I recommend relaxing your anal sphincter a bit, it's cutting off the oxygen supply to what's left of your brain.
            --
            Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @09:35PM (3 children)

              by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @09:35PM (#1170519)

              Wow. Troll for saying you should link to actual evidence, +5 insightful for saying you should accede to groupthink.

              I was not being antivax, I was pointing out that linking to Fox being antivax would completely short-circuit any argument that they are not anti-vax. Linking to NYT means nothing. It is as valid as linking to The Drudge Report to prove that the election was stolen from Donnie.

              Things that are generally accepted as factual don't need to be accompanied by up-front support:

              Then why the link to NYT ?

              • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Wednesday August 25 2021, @07:02AM

                by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Wednesday August 25 2021, @07:02AM (#1170692) Homepage
                You were getting in a flap about nothing, wasting everyone's time. Like someone who says "look, there's a single bright pixel in my photo of the sky - it must be a UFO" and demanding an explanation. It's obviously a flying windmill, please go tilt at it on your own.
                --
                Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
              • (Score: 2) by drussell on Wednesday August 25 2021, @01:35PM (1 child)

                by drussell (2678) on Wednesday August 25 2021, @01:35PM (#1170805) Journal

                Really? You don't know what Fox' stance has been?

                There's a bunch of typical example clips, along with rebuttals to the falsehoods in this segment:

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEJufOyAbis [youtube.com]

                • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @06:11PM

                  by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @06:11PM (#1170896)

                  As I've said before, Fox news has run some irresponsible segments but it doesn't help that CNN takes some of those segments out of context. Text without context is pretext.

            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 27 2021, @10:40AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 27 2021, @10:40AM (#1171379)

              Things that are generally accepted as factual don't need to be accompanied by up-front support: they're, literally, taken as read.

              1 out of 5 democrats and 2 out of 5 republicans disagree with you. 30% disagreement is not "generally accepted".

          • (Score: 2) by drussell on Wednesday August 25 2021, @01:32PM (1 child)

            by drussell (2678) on Wednesday August 25 2021, @01:32PM (#1170803) Journal

            Here you go, buddy:

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEJufOyAbis&t=51s [youtube.com]

            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 27 2021, @01:20AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 27 2021, @01:20AM (#1171303)

              Is Tucker Carlson an idiot? Yes.
              Is he being an anti-vax idiot in those clips ? Yes
              Do edited, 10 second, out of context clips of said idiot, curated by a competitor, prove anything about general Fox policy? No.

              Why not link to him being anti-vax idiot on Fox?

      • (Score: 4, Informative) by Beryllium Sphere (r) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @07:36AM

        by Beryllium Sphere (r) (5062) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @07:36AM (#1170194)

        There are some hard numbers and a decently balanced look at this in a definitely non-Democratic publication:
        https://reason.com/2021/08/22/texas-lt-gov-dan-patrick-is-right-that-democrats-have-a-vaccine-hesitancy-problem-but-its-not-nearly-as-big-as-the-gops/ [reason.com]

        The propaganda problem does extend well beyond just Fox.

      • (Score: 4, Informative) by FatPhil on Tuesday August 24 2021, @12:23PM (4 children)

        by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Tuesday August 24 2021, @12:23PM (#1170289) Homepage
        That logically fallacy is called "nut picking". It's basically like cherry picking, but you go out looking for the nuts, not the cherries. It's a form of hasty generalisation. You've found a small subset of group A that do X therefore all A do X. All the while overlooking the fact that larger subsets of group B do X. If you genuinely think doing X is a negative, and you're not disingenuous, then your attention is best focussed on the Bs than the As. Why do you focus on the As - is it because you don't genuinely think doing X is negative and you just wanted to take a cheap stab at the either the X-doing subset of A or even all As by association, or is it because you're disingenuous?
        --
        Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @09:42PM (2 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @09:42PM (#1170520)

          Maybe if you have nuts in both group A and group B you should stop focusing on which group they are in and instead focus on why they are nuts.
          Why is the 'Left' more determined to make anti-vax political than even the 'Right'?

          • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Wednesday August 25 2021, @07:30AM (1 child)

            by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Wednesday August 25 2021, @07:30AM (#1170700) Homepage
            It's not, you've performed a hasty generalisation. I've seen way more "muh freedums" (which is a political statement about citizens' rights) from the right than the left. So again, you'd be more accurate if you directed your attention to group B for this X too.

            Next barrel please, I've shot all the fish in this one...
            --
            Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @10:41AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @10:41AM (#1170758)

              By your own figures, one third of anti-vaxxers are democrats. Maybe there is more to it than just which lizard they vote for.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 09 2021, @02:13PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 09 2021, @02:13PM (#1176263)

          Good point.

          It should also be noted that, among conservatives, rural areas are much more likely to be unvaccinated. This could be for a number of reasons but part of it could also be a lack of convenient access? Also people in rural areas may be less likely to spread the virus as there is less congestion (but if they do get it it could be much worse if they have less access to advanced medical facilities so it might still be worth making the effort to getting them vaccinated)?

      • (Score: 3, Touché) by epitaxial on Tuesday August 24 2021, @12:48PM

        by epitaxial (3165) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @12:48PM (#1170299)

        I don't see black and latino groups actively protesting against vaccines and masks. That is the key difference. Google any anti mask protest and its 100% white people.

      • (Score: 2) by HammeredGlass on Tuesday August 24 2021, @02:15PM

        by HammeredGlass (12241) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @02:15PM (#1170322)

        Yep, check out the vax rates in NYC -> https://i.imgur.com/yJQ2cMY.jpg [imgur.com]

      • (Score: 3, Interesting) by DeathMonkey on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:08PM

        by DeathMonkey (1380) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:08PM (#1170394) Journal

        The MSM tries to blame Fox news for vaccine hesitancy but very few people, overall, watch fox news and how many of the unvaccinated really watch Fox news (and while, sure, sometimes Fox news may have irresponsible segments just like CNN does the fact of matter is that, overall, Fox news is not anti-vax so it's disingenuous, at best, for the MSM to blame Fox news for vaccine hesitancy).

        Only 62% of Fox viewers are vaccinated compared to 83% for CNN and MSNBC, poll shows [independent.co.uk]

    • (Score: 2) by Beryllium Sphere (r) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:55AM (2 children)

      by Beryllium Sphere (r) (5062) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:55AM (#1170166)

      We'll see soon enough. Meantime a lot more places have announced vaccination requirements. Uptake may increase because people choose to keep their jobs.

      • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:57AM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:57AM (#1170187)

        In a "new normal" of working from home, eviction bans and government checks?

        • (Score: 2) by DeathMonkey on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:19PM

          by DeathMonkey (1380) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:19PM (#1170404) Journal

          No, conservatives freaking out about things that are not happing is the same boring old normal we've grown accustomed to over the last 40 years.

    • (Score: 2) by driverless on Tuesday August 24 2021, @07:39AM

      by driverless (4770) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @07:39AM (#1170196)

      Three in 10 unvaccinated adults said they'd be more likely to get a vaccine if one moved from emergency authorization to full approval by the FDA

      It depends whether that's the real reason or just a convenient excuse. As you say, it could just be some convenient goalposts to be moved as required...

    • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @07:49AM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @07:49AM (#1170199)

      I for one am never getting Trump's vaccine.

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by c0lo on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:05AM (7 children)

    by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:05AM (#1170130) Journal

    Comirnaty, Illuminati and Vaxzevria - WTF is wrong with the marketing heads?

    --
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
    • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:16AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:16AM (#1170136)

      Look at this.

      Aussie, i.e., criminal, can't handle anything.

      Nuke it from the orbit is the only option.

    • (Score: 5, Informative) by takyon on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:39AM (4 children)

      by takyon (881) <{takyon} {at} {soylentnews.org}> on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:39AM (#1170180) Journal

      Requirements from FDA and equivalents, zillions of pre-existing drug names, etc.

      Why drug names are so increasingly weird [chicagotribune.com]

      With thousands of drugs on the market, the No. 1 reason drug names are rejected by the Food and Drug Administration is that the agency doesn't want names to be too similar when prescriptions are filled, said Brannon Cashion, global president of branding firm Addison Whitney.

      The concern is that the prescribed drug will be confused with another, which could cause serious medical problems or even death. "Letters get transposed, letters get confused," Cashion said. "The pharmacist is often scrolling down an alphabetized list."

      Proposed drug names also can't elicit an air of superiority. Superbeststatin, for instance, would be a no-go with the FDA.

      And names should avoid eliciting any cultural confusion or sensitivity around the world.

      What's In A Drug Name? Sometimes, Enough To Cause Mix-Ups [npr.org]

      There are nearly 800 pairs of drugs like Clindesse and Clindets that look or sound alike, according to the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, or ISMP, a patient safety group that compiled a list of them. And the ISMP says all of these similarly named drugs are a big problem, because name mix-ups are responsible for about 25 percent of all medication errors.

      "We see errors all the time," Michael Cohen, president of ISMP, tells Shots. "And though it's rare, some of these mix-ups are fatal."

      The Food and Drug Administration has a name review process that's supposed to prevent pharmaceutical companies from using a name that's too close to another one already on the market. And they have forced drug companies to change the names of about a dozen drugs over the years, says Cohen.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:55AM (2 children)

        by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:55AM (#1170186) Journal

        That's... relatable, I sorta can understand.

        --
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
        • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @08:13AM (1 child)

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @08:13AM (#1170212)

          Then this will tear off the band-aid again. Moderna's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine's name once it gets approved in the US will be "Spikevax."

      • (Score: 2) by hendrikboom on Thursday August 26 2021, @09:53AM

        by hendrikboom (1125) Subscriber Badge on Thursday August 26 2021, @09:53AM (#1171132) Homepage Journal

        Drug names can be a real problem.
        My wife was once given a fertility drug instead of a birth control drug because the names were too similar.

    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:40PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:40PM (#1170356) Journal

      Comirnaty, Illuminati and Vaxzevria - WTF is wrong with the marketing heads?

      They took their own vaccines.

      --
      Trump is a poor man's idea of a rich man, a weak man's idea of a strong man, and a stupid man's idea of a smart man.
  • (Score: 2) by Rosco P. Coltrane on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:59AM (10 children)

    by Rosco P. Coltrane (4757) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:59AM (#1170148)

    The Pfizer vaccine will now be marketed as Comirnaty, said the FDA.

    Why? What was it called before? Fucktavax? I've never known it under any other name.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @04:49AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @04:49AM (#1170155)

      Hint: it's neither the fact itself, nor the reporting of it, nor the person of the reporter or her/his publication, that is made to look like a moron by your public display of total uninformedness and unwillingness (or inability?) to type three words into a search engine.

      Yes, I know. This sentence was too complex for you. You will scold me for it. I don't give damn. Because I wasn't writing it for you.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:30AM (6 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:30AM (#1170172)

      It wasn't called anything.

      No, really. Pfizer was not allowed to market the vaccine nor use a trade name. That is why you had people refer to it generally as "the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine" or use either of its generic name "tozinameran" or its clinical trial candidate designation "BNT162b2." None of which are a name but more of a description used in place of a name.

      • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Tuesday August 24 2021, @12:37PM (5 children)

        by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Tuesday August 24 2021, @12:37PM (#1170294) Homepage
        "The name Comirnaty—already in use elsewhere, including Europe—is a mash-up of "COVID-19 immunity" and "mRNA" that is meant to evoke the word "community."" -- https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/08/fda-approves-pfizers-covid-19-vaccine-now-called-comirnaty/

        It's not our fault if you're slow.
        --
        Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @07:45PM (1 child)

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @07:45PM (#1170483)

          that is meant to evoke the word "community."

          Well it failed, the first way my brain tried to correct it was comorbidity - which probably isn't what they're going for. It does keep the togetherness vibe with "co-" in it at least...

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @03:28AM

            by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @03:28AM (#1170640)

            My first connection was "community" but that is probably more to do with hearing it first, instead of reading it.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @03:26AM (2 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @03:26AM (#1170639)

          I'm sorry and maybe it is because I'm slow, but what does any of that have to do with what they called it before coming up with that name?

          • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Wednesday August 25 2021, @07:42AM (1 child)

            by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Wednesday August 25 2021, @07:42AM (#1170708) Homepage
            That's already been answered elsewhere. What you're also failing to comprehend is that your initial point of ~"it wasn't called that before today" has been proven false. I can't stop you from making false claims, but I can at least ask that you acknowledge your mistakes when they're explained to you.
            --
            Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @08:18AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @08:18AM (#1170716)

              I would acknowledge my mistake, if I had made that claim. The question was: "'The Pfizer vaccine will now be marketed as Comirnaty, said the FDA.' Why? What was it called before? Fucktavax? I've never known it under any other name.'" The U.S. isn't the world but when the question is "what was it called in the US before the FDA allowed it to be called by its trade name?" that answer is correct. Just like if the question was "what was it called in the EU before the EMA allowed them to use a trade name?" the answer would be the same. Just like the answer of "what did Pfizer call it before coming up with a name at all?" If you are in a location with marketing restrictions, like most people on this site, there is a good chance you've never heard the name before its approval in your area or it never stuck compared to the other alternatives the media uses because they are literally not allowed to use that name before then in your area.

    • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:38AM

      by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday August 24 2021, @06:38AM (#1170179) Journal

      The Pfizer vaccine will now be marketed as Comirnaty, said the FDA

      Why?

      To avoid being confused with the:
      - Pfizer covid-19 booster
      - Pfizer HIV vaccine
      - Pfizer melanoma vaccine
      - Pfizer etc...
      As for the choice of the name...

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:41PM

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday August 24 2021, @03:41PM (#1170358) Journal

      The FDA requires drugs to have ridiculous names as a condition of approval.

      --
      Trump is a poor man's idea of a rich man, a weak man's idea of a strong man, and a stupid man's idea of a smart man.
  • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @04:32AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @04:32AM (#1170153)

    Tested and approved in record time! TV says there is nothing to worry about.

  • (Score: -1, Redundant) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @04:53AM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @04:53AM (#1170156)

    The zealots will be frothing at the mouth more than ever. If you don't get jabbed, you must not love yourself, or your family, or your friends, or even life itself.

    We understand, you're SKEERED. Well, not just SKEERED, you're SKEERED SHITLESS! But, give it a break. And wipe your chin. All that frothing will just spread the disease further and faster.

  • (Score: 3, Funny) by istartedi on Tuesday August 24 2021, @04:53AM (2 children)

    by istartedi (123) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @04:53AM (#1170157) Journal

    In case you're wondering, the logo for Comirnaty will look like this. [amazon.com]

    --
    Appended to the end of comments you post. Max: 120 chars.
    • (Score: 2) by hendrikboom on Thursday August 26 2021, @09:57AM (1 child)

      by hendrikboom (1125) Subscriber Badge on Thursday August 26 2021, @09:57AM (#1171134) Homepage Journal

      looks like misinformation.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 26 2021, @09:54PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 26 2021, @09:54PM (#1171267)

        It's a joke. In case you or someone else doesn't understand Comirnaty sounds like community. There was a show called "Community" about a community college. Said community college's logo and motto appear on that link.

  • (Score: 1, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @04:58AM (5 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @04:58AM (#1170159)

    Now that the science is settled and Pfizer's jab has been proven safe, and in the interest of removing any reason to be hesitant, one would assume they will be waiving their immunity from legal liability as granted by the invocation of the PREP Act.... right?

    I mean... it's safe, so they don't need to be worried about people having bad outcomes as a result of accepting the jab. Right?

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:22AM (2 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:22AM (#1170161)

      The situation may be different in other counties, but afaik liability for vaccine injuries in the US has been taken over by a federal government agency in 1986.

      If you suffer injury and the agency agrees, you may get compensation. But money can't really make up for living with serious after effects for decades.

      • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @08:49PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @08:49PM (#1170507)

        So you think the PREP Act is fake news? I mean, CNBC has a story about it...

        https://www.cnbc.com/2020/12/16/covid-vaccine-side-effects-compensation-lawsuit.html [cnbc.com]

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @04:00AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @04:00AM (#1170656)

        If you suffer injury and the agency agrees, you may get compensation. But money can't really make up for living with serious after effects for decades.

        You get money if you get infected by COVID?

    • (Score: 4, Insightful) by Beryllium Sphere (r) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:50AM (1 child)

      by Beryllium Sphere (r) (5062) on Tuesday August 24 2021, @05:50AM (#1170165)

      Given the way the legal system works, they'd be fools to let greedy lawyers and prostituted "expert witnesses" make things up and sell them to juries chosen for ignorance in exchange for $19.50 per dose.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @08:56PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 24 2021, @08:56PM (#1170509)

        Would it be fair to characterize your opinion as "Vaccine makers (or pharmaceutical companies in general?) should never bear any liability for injuries incurred by patients because that would allow for fraudulent claims to be made against them"?

        Does this reasoning extend to all realms of medicine?

        To any area of human endeavor which is complex enough to require the testimony of expert witnesses?

        What would cite as the distinguishing factor between an industry which should bear liability for the safety of its products (if there are any) versus the industries which shouldn't, due to the possibility of fraudulent claims?

  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @01:19AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 25 2021, @01:19AM (#1170605)

    They earned it fair are square.

    Lots of test cases. Generally a good outcome. That's not a lottery prize to win. It is a non-tirvial scientific accomplishment to earn.

(1)