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posted by janrinok on Wednesday September 08, @10:57PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the wanted:-large-photo-album dept.

Samsung targets 2025 for human-eye-beating 576 MP camera sensor

A confidential slide shown during a recent Samsung presentation has revealed that the company is targeting a 2025 timeframe for producing a 576 MP camera sensor. Samsung has already announced its plans to eventually release a sensor that can beat out the human eye resolution perception of 500 MP.

[...] Back in 2020, Samsung discussed how producing a 600 MP camera sensor was one of its aims, with an official editorial opining that this would go beyond the 500 MP resolution at which human eyes view the world. This recent information refines that 600 MP goal to 576 MP and even puts a target date of 2025 on it. However, don't expect a 576 MP main camera to make an appearance on a Galaxy S25 smartphone, as the giant sensors are more likely planned for use in future self-driving cars.

The Vera C. Rubin Observatory (LSST) uses a 3.2 gigapixel camera.

Related: Hasselblad's New 400-Megapixel Multi-Shot Camera Captures 2.4GB Stills
Xiaomi Smartphone Will Use Samsung Camera Sensor to Take Up to 108 Megapixel Images
How Camera Companies can Survive the Smartphone


Original Submission

Related Stories

Hasselblad's New 400-Megapixel Multi-Shot Camera Captures 2.4GB Stills 23 comments

A couple years ago, Hasselblad released a 200-megapixel, Multi-Shot version of its H5D medium format camera. Now it's back with a bonkers, 400-megapixel version of the H6D: the H6D-400c.

Hasselblad's Multi-Shot technology is pretty straightforward: it takes four 100-megapixel images, shifting the sensor by one pixel for each capture, and then two more shots that shift the sensor by half a pixel. By combining all six stills, the resulting file is a single 400-megapixel (23200 x 17400 pixel) 16-bit TIFF file that weighs in at 2.4GB. In fact, the images are large enough that the camera needs to be tethered to a computer to capture them.

[...] The camera will go for $47,995 when it launches in March, compared to the H6D-100c's relatively modest $27,000 price tag.

Story at The Verge.


Original Submission

Xiaomi Smartphone Will Use Samsung Camera Sensor to Take Up to 108 Megapixel Images 20 comments

Xiaomi and Samsung Tease Upcoming Smartphone with 108MP Image Sensor

Xiaomi actually made two announcements today. The first is that it will be using Samsung's ISOCELL GW1 64MP image sensor in an upcoming Redmi phone. That, in and of itself, is a big deal. The GW1 uses "tetracell" technology (read: a quad-bayer array) to shoot 16MP images in low light, but thanks to a "remosaic" algorithm, it can still spit out full-resolution 64MP images in bright conditions. It's the highest resolution smartphone image sensor available... for now.

That's because this announcement was overshadowed by the news that Xiaomi and Samsung have teamed up on an even higher resolution "100MP" camera...

[...] The teaser says "100MP" but claims a total resolution of 12032 by 9024, which comes out to just over 108MP when you do the math. Following in the GW1's footsteps, we would guess that this, too, uses a quad-bayer array to produce 27MP images in normal shooting conditions, relying on the same remosaic algorithm to reconstruct full-res 108MP files when there's enough of light to go around.


Original Submission

How Camera Companies can Survive the Smartphone 62 comments

https://photographylife.com/camera-companies-smartphone-survival

For the past few years, the camera market has been contracting at an unusually fast pace, resulting in decreased sales of DSLR and mirrorless cameras. The point-and-shoot market is already dead, and entry-level camera sales have also seen huge declines worldwide. This is mostly attributed to the rise of the smartphone, and the fact that smartphone manufacturers have been moving into the camera industry, focusing heavily on camera features. The outlook of the smartphone invasion is pretty grim, and it seems like some companies might not be able to survive as a result. So the big question is, is there anything camera manufacturers can do to stay afloat? I have been wondering about this for a while now, so I have decided to put together some of my thoughts in this article.

The story is a long read, but raises many excellent points. One of the first takeaways was that good cellphone cameras are: compact, quick and easy to use. Professional and prosumer They are carrying around heavy, bulky items that are to time-consuming to get set up.

Original Submission

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  • (Score: 1, Offtopic) by MostCynical on Wednesday September 08, @11:27PM (1 child)

    by MostCynical (2589) on Wednesday September 08, @11:27PM (#1176027) Journal

    But Instagram/Twitter 'influencers' need a camera that can reveal microscopic blemishes so they can sell you something to fix them!!

    --
    Books are a poor substitute for female companionship, but they are easier to find. P Rothfuss “The Wise Man's Fear"
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 08, @11:41PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 08, @11:41PM (#1176033)

      Can we go back to selfie sticks so i don't have to see nose hairs and zits.

  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 09, @12:25AM (6 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 09, @12:25AM (#1176048)

    So the size of the element makes it too big for smartphones, but they intend to use it in self driving cars.
    That means the cost goes up along with all the hardware needed to process the data.
    Also, anyone shooting video or trying to work with those files will need a pretty beefy workstation setup.

    Let's see...if the 400Mp makes 2.4Gb files what does a 576Mb make?
    400/576 = 2.4/x So x =3.1Gb

    Doubt a 4Gb system will allow you to even work on one file after OS overhead.
    Better have a good internet connection too if you plan to shit those files down the pipe.

    No doubt there are plenty of gaming rigs out there ready for the job.

    Lastly, this will be kickass for the Amature Astronomy buffs out there.
    Look forward to seeing the benifits of this tech hit that group.
    Enjoy!

    • (Score: 2) by legont on Thursday September 09, @02:02AM (2 children)

      by legont (4179) on Thursday September 09, @02:02AM (#1176065)

      Human brain processes only a tiny bit of information it's eyes is collecting. We need to change software accordingly.

      --
      "Wealth is the relentless enemy of understanding" - John Kenneth Galbraith.
      • (Score: 2) by maxwell demon on Thursday September 09, @06:33AM (1 child)

        by maxwell demon (1608) on Thursday September 09, @06:33AM (#1176139) Journal

        We already do to an extent. That's what lossy image compression is. However we cannot go the complete way for image storage, as our brain processing treats different parts of the image from our eyes differently. On the other hand, you don't look just at one spot of an image on screen. Therefore you need to treat the full image the way our brain only treats the tiny central spot.

        --
        The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
        • (Score: 2) by legont on Thursday September 09, @01:40PM

          by legont (4179) on Thursday September 09, @01:40PM (#1176248)

          In the end we'll have to process and store only a small part of the image that the software decides is important. At this point we'll have our AIs having all the human artifacts such as false memories and hallucinations. I did not see that motorcycle officer, sir, sorry; and the memory dump, if still available, will confirm.

          --
          "Wealth is the relentless enemy of understanding" - John Kenneth Galbraith.
    • (Score: 2) by driverless on Thursday September 09, @02:03AM (1 child)

      by driverless (4770) on Thursday September 09, @02:03AM (#1176066)

      the company is targeting a 2025 timeframe for producing a 576 MP camera sensor.

      What the press release doesn't mention is that they're targeting a 2030 timeframe for figuring out what you're supposed to do with a 576 MP camera sensor.

      • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Thursday September 09, @01:47PM

        by Freeman (732) on Thursday September 09, @01:47PM (#1176251) Journal

        Easy Microfiche reading, without a special lens/setup?

        --
        Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
    • (Score: 2) by aim on Thursday September 09, @01:47PM

      by aim (6322) on Thursday September 09, @01:47PM (#1176250)

      Lastly, this will be kickass for the Amature Astronomy buffs out there.

      Not really, I'll gladly use a lower resolution sensor if it is less noisy and has greater dynamic range. I'm not convinced binning will help that much.

      Higher rez also won't help with clouded skies and Starlink sats.

  • (Score: 1) by anubi on Thursday September 09, @05:28AM (1 child)

    by anubi (2828) on Thursday September 09, @05:28AM (#1176120) Journal

    Do we have lensing yet that can accommodate such high resolution?

    This a wet dream of governments a few years ago.

    --
    "Prove all things; hold fast that which is good." [KJV: I Thessalonians 5:21]
    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by maxwell demon on Thursday September 09, @06:38AM

      by maxwell demon (1608) on Thursday September 09, @06:38AM (#1176143) Journal

      Do we have lensing yet that can accommodate such high resolution?

      Sure. The trick is to make the lens large enough.

      --
      The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 09, @08:27AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 09, @08:27AM (#1176169)

    Great. There's a worldwide shortage of electronic chips, developers left and right struggle to get even basic components and Samsung decides to put 576 million gates on a silicon die for .... something they might have a use for one day. Perhaps.

    • (Score: 3, Touché) by FatPhil on Thursday September 09, @11:40AM

      by FatPhil (863) <reversethis-{if.fdsa} {ta} {tnelyos-cp}> on Thursday September 09, @11:40AM (#1176217) Homepage
      They're *planning*.

      It might never happen. And the chip shortage may have turned into a glut by 2025, the waves in the silicon world have fluctuated with few-years periods before.
      --
      I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
  • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 09, @02:46PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 09, @02:46PM (#1176271)

    Another 2025 prediction, eh? Takin' the usual BS route of predicting something so far into the future that no one can hold 'em accountable or even remember when their glorious claims fail to realize. I'm sick of all these--

    Wait, it's what year currently?

    Ah crap, I'm officially old.

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