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posted by martyb on Sunday September 12, @07:05PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the don't-catch-the-buzz dept.

Apple Warns Against Mounting iPhones to Motorcycles

Apple warns against mounting iPhones to motorcycles:

This has gotta be one of the weirdest ways you can ruin an iPhone camera.

Apple posted a new page to its support website warning iPhone owners to be careful about exposing their phones to the specific vibration frequencies found in "high-power or high-volume motorcycle engine." News of the support page first popped up in a report from MacRumors.

Apparently, operating these phones too close to those engines can fry the cameras in iPhones with optical image stabilization (OIS) or closed-loop autofocus (AF) technology. Every iPhone from the 7 onward has at least one of those things inside it, so if you've bought an iPhone in the past four or five years, it could potentially be at risk.

Exposure to Vibrations, Like Those Generated by High-powered Motorcycle Engines, Might Impact iPhone

Exposure to vibrations, like those generated by high-powered motorcycle engines, might impact iPhone cameras:

The iPhone camera helps you take great photos in any situation—from everyday moments to studio-quality portraits. The advanced camera systems in some iPhone models include technology like optical image stabilization and closed-loop autofocus to help you capture great photos even in difficult conditions. These systems work to automatically counteract movement, vibrations, and the effects of gravity to let you focus on taking a great shot.

[...] The OIS and closed-loop AF systems in iPhone are designed for durability. However, as is the case with many consumer electronics that include systems like OIS, long-term direct exposure to high-amplitude vibrations within certain frequency ranges may degrade the performance of these systems and lead to reduced image quality for photos and videos. It is recommended to avoid exposing your iPhone to extended high-amplitude vibrations.

High-power or high-volume motorcycle engines generate intense high-amplitude vibrations, which are transmitted through the chassis and handlebars. It is not recommended to attach your iPhone to motorcycles with high-power or high-volume engines due to the amplitude of the vibration in certain frequency ranges that they generate. Attaching your iPhone to vehicles with small-volume or electric engines, such as mopeds and scooters, may lead to comparatively lower-amplitude vibrations, but if you do so a vibration dampening mount is recommended to lessen the risk of damage to your iPhone and its OIS and AF systems. It is also recommended to avoid regular use for prolonged periods to further lessen the risk of damage.

Also at engadget [engadget.com].


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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @07:15PM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @07:15PM (#1177269)

    one wonder what type of unholy progeny can result from an iphone rutting a motorcycle.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @07:54PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @07:54PM (#1177280)

      The posermobile mating with the poserphone should produce nonviable offspring, or at least ones too retarded to propagate the poser gene.

    • (Score: 3, Funny) by Farmer Tim on Monday September 13, @10:35AM

      by Farmer Tim (6490) on Monday September 13, @10:35AM (#1177384)
      That’s where Segways come from.
      --
      Caution: 90% probability the above is tongue in cheek.
  • (Score: 5, Informative) by lars on Sunday September 12, @07:15PM (6 children)

    by lars (4376) on Sunday September 12, @07:15PM (#1177270)

    I've heard about this issue for a few years on motorcycle forums. Just looking at the videos taken by handlebar mounted phones, you can see everything go blurry when the engine revs. All phones with OIS seem affected. This is why GoPro action cams only use software video stabilization, even when OIS would have looked better since they tend to get exposed to much more vibration than most phones/cameras.

    • (Score: 5, Informative) by Runaway1956 on Sunday September 12, @07:21PM (3 children)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Sunday September 12, @07:21PM (#1177272) Homepage Journal

      Aren't most GoPros mounted to the helmet? You've got a good bit of meat insulating the GoPro from the engine vibrations with that kind of a mount. Mounting anything solidly to any part of the frame guarantees that it will be vibrated mercilessly.

      I'm not arguing that the software makes a difference, merely pointing out that iPhone and GoPro mounts are quite different from each other.

      --
      Let's go Brandon!
      • (Score: 2) by DavePolaschek on Sunday September 12, @08:46PM

        by DavePolaschek (6129) Subscriber Badge on Sunday September 12, @08:46PM (#1177297) Homepage Journal

        Many folks tried to mount cameras (especially GoPros) to the handlebars, windshield, and all sorts of various things when the cameras were new. Helmet-mount quickly became the standard for a few reasons: theft of the cam, because you usually take your helmet with; crash survivability, because if you leave the bike due to falling down, your helmet frequently is one of the less damaged things; and because of vibration, though the handlebars on some dual sports are about as vibration-free as the helmet, and are less likely to point in directions the bike isn’t going.

        But yeah, helmet mount is good fit a lot of reasons. Bike-mounted is better for power (especially back before batteries got as good as they are today). And with dampers (weights to change the resonant frequency), handlebar-mounted can be better, but that’s more fiddly.

      • (Score: 2) by crafoo on Monday September 13, @05:54AM

        by crafoo (6639) on Monday September 13, @05:54AM (#1177369)

        I bought a spare tank off eBay that had a camera mount at the top of the tank just behind the windscreen. The tank is isolated from the frame with rubber grommets. I imagine it’s a common location on this type of bike. The view is a little low but it’s protected at least.

      • (Score: 2) by lars on Monday September 13, @01:41PM

        by lars (4376) on Monday September 13, @01:41PM (#1177401)

        I had mine handlebar mounted initially, but use a top helmet mount now. My reason for changing was the vibration. They do have plenty of handlebar mounts for GoPros, but I think they are more oriented for bicycles. Mine being a motocross bike with a single cylinder and rigid engine mounts is particularly bad for vibrations. I'm thinking of going with a chest mount as it shows the bike for context, so things look less like they are floating. I've had the camera knocked back when going under low branches, so a side helmet mount might work better than a top mount.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @07:58PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @07:58PM (#1177282)

      I would doubt software stabilization would work at all-- having done it myself, the vibrations at ~1500 rpm/25 Hz were a divisor of the same rate that CMOS sensors download (100Hz?). It was Strobe-tastic.

      • (Score: 2) by HiThere on Sunday September 12, @08:23PM

        by HiThere (866) on Sunday September 12, @08:23PM (#1177291) Journal

        If your right, software stabilization shouldn't yield a good image in the specified scenario. It still shouldn't wreck the camera.

        --
        Javascript is what you use to allow unknown third parties to run software you have no idea about on your computer.
  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by John Bresnahan on Sunday September 12, @07:25PM (4 children)

    by John Bresnahan (5989) on Sunday September 12, @07:25PM (#1177273)

    N/T

    • (Score: 5, Funny) by krishnoid on Sunday September 12, @09:02PM

      by krishnoid (1156) on Sunday September 12, @09:02PM (#1177303)

      In that vein, I see the weird way to damage autofocus/stabilization, and raise attaching it to an actual vibrator.

    • (Score: 2) by shortscreen on Sunday September 12, @09:11PM (2 children)

      by shortscreen (2252) Subscriber Badge on Sunday September 12, @09:11PM (#1177305) Journal

      Maybe it'll be fine if your motorcycle has an inline-6 engine.

      • (Score: 2) by Fnord666 on Monday September 13, @01:04PM (1 child)

        by Fnord666 (652) Subscriber Badge on Monday September 13, @01:04PM (#1177392) Homepage

        Maybe it'll be fine if your motorcycle has an inline-6 engine.

        Like these [rideapart.com]?

        • (Score: 3, Insightful) by shortscreen on Monday September 13, @10:44PM

          by shortscreen (2252) Subscriber Badge on Monday September 13, @10:44PM (#1177522) Journal

          Yes.

          Long answer:
          1) Inline-6 (and flat-6) are known for having lesser vibrations.
          2) An expensive, hard-to-get product fits perfectly as an Apple accessory.

  • (Score: 1, Flamebait) by SomeGuy on Sunday September 12, @07:43PM (11 children)

    by SomeGuy (5632) on Sunday September 12, @07:43PM (#1177276)

    Apparently, operating these phones too close to those engines can fry the cameras in iPhones

    Cool. Other fun ways to destroy stupid iPhones include:

    Sledge hammer
    Run over with car
    Throw out of 40th story window
    Chain gun
    Deep fried
    Charge of 1,000,000 volts
    and many, many, more!

    • (Score: 3, Funny) by RamiK on Sunday September 12, @08:22PM (7 children)

      by RamiK (1813) on Sunday September 12, @08:22PM (#1177290)

      Missed a classic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWqw5SpITg8 [youtube.com]

      Bonus question: Anyone care to guess my secret rice curry ingredient? Hint: It's not an iphone...

      --
      compiling...
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @08:25PM (5 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @08:25PM (#1177292)

        Blended rice?

        • (Score: 2) by RamiK on Sunday September 12, @11:11PM (4 children)

          by RamiK (1813) on Sunday September 12, @11:11PM (#1177327)

          Nope. Though Asian make cookie dough with bleded cooked rice so that one is on me.

          Another hint: It's used in moderation.

          --
          compiling...
          • (Score: 0, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @11:31PM (3 children)

            by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @11:31PM (#1177331)

            Ummm, your mom?

            • (Score: 1, Spam) by RamiK on Monday September 13, @02:16PM (2 children)

              by RamiK (1813) on Monday September 13, @02:16PM (#1177413)

              Well, there was that one time with an rusty ol' can opener and an overly eager kitten out to prove human legs are just as good as scratch posts...

              But no. Oh, and the above was a hint too.

              Regardless, to cut short and spare us all another yo momma joke when I'm already well within the dad realm of comedy:

              Spam!
              --
              compiling...
              • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 14, @04:41AM (1 child)

                by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 14, @04:41AM (#1177608)

                Modded spam. Worth the 30 day ban....

                • (Score: 2) by RamiK on Tuesday September 14, @10:30AM

                  by RamiK (1813) on Tuesday September 14, @10:30AM (#1177652)

                  Yup :)

                  --
                  compiling...
      • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @10:40PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @10:40PM (#1177321)

        Another classic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JYfLgsu1sQ [youtube.com]

    • (Score: 3, Touché) by sjames on Sunday September 12, @10:04PM

      by sjames (2882) on Sunday September 12, @10:04PM (#1177313) Journal

      You left out use it on a humid day (according to Apple and their "moisture" sensors) or hold it wrong.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 13, @07:09PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 13, @07:09PM (#1177477)

      Flamebait, flamebait, flamebait! You insulted my pwecious wittle iPhone! Boooo hoooo!111 Accept the great Apple Steve Jobs way and become a good little nig just like the rest of us! iPhomes are great! All praise iPhones!

  • (Score: 2, Offtopic) by Snotnose on Sunday September 12, @08:49PM (12 children)

    by Snotnose (1623) on Sunday September 12, @08:49PM (#1177300)

    Funny, last night I watched a YouTube video of some motorcycle guy with a gopro on his helmet. Freeway stop and go traffic, this guy is doing about 30 MPH lane splitting and cutting in and out of traffic. The inevitable happens, someone in a car changes lanes via the lane the poster was splitting, nails the driver side door, rolls around a bit. Then gets up and starts cussing out the car driver.

    The dude posting the video was clearly at fault but, even after watching the video of himself, clearly felt he was in the clear for driving like an asshole and paying the price.

    --
    Why can't I age like a fine wine, instead of last week's milk?
    • (Score: 2, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @09:07PM (4 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @09:07PM (#1177304)

      Some states in the US actually permit motorcycles to legally ride in between highway lanes. I guess that's another way to keep the number of motorcycles riders under control.

      • (Score: 4, Insightful) by EvilSS on Sunday September 12, @10:54PM (3 children)

        by EvilSS (1456) Subscriber Badge on Sunday September 12, @10:54PM (#1177322)
        State not states. California is the only state where it's not illegal to lane split on a motorcycle.
        • (Score: 0, Flamebait) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @11:00PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @11:00PM (#1177323)

          Freedom! Oh wait, you said CA. That's where the commie-fascists live ain't it.

        • (Score: 3, Informative) by Runaway1956 on Monday September 13, @03:29AM (1 child)

          by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Monday September 13, @03:29AM (#1177359) Homepage Journal

          You err. It is not illegal in Texas. There is simply no law that makes it illegal, nor is there one that makes it legal. Multiple attempts to create a law that explicitly makes it legal have failed. But, you can't get a ticket for violating a law that doesn't exist. However, if a cop sees you, and believes that you are driving recklessly, he will give you a ticket for reckless driving. Depending on whether you were being a real ass, you might beat it in court.

          I'm not sure if there are other states with the same legal conundrum. But, you're right in that California is the only state with a law that makes it LEGAL.

          --
          Let's go Brandon!
          • (Score: 3, Informative) by EvilSS on Monday September 13, @05:38PM

            by EvilSS (1456) Subscriber Badge on Monday September 13, @05:38PM (#1177446)
            I'm afraid it's you who err:

            "Is lane splitting legal in Texas?

            Truth is, Texas has no law that explicitly mentions lane splitting. Texas Transportation Code § 545.060 states that all road users must remain within a single lane, which essentially makes lane splitting illegal."

            https://www.statesman.com/story/sponsor-story/thomas-henry/2021/05/26/lane-splitting-hotly-contested-among-motorcyclists-but-legal/5173040001/ [statesman.com]

            Lane Splitting Laws in Texas

            Lane splitting is illegal in Texas, but only because there is no law making it legal for motorcyclists to move between vehicles in the same lane. The only laws dictating lane splitting are those that state that vehicles may only move within a single marked lane and leave them only when it is safe to do so. Since motorcycles slip by large moving vehicles while lane splitting, traffic officials consider this maneuver unsafe under the current driving laws.

            Currently, the state gives lane splitters a $175 fine. However, the state is in the process of legalizing lane splitting. Senate Bill 288 is currently in the Texas Senate. If passed, the bill will make the practice legal for motorcyclists across the state. The bill will allow motorcyclists to pass traffic at speeds no greater than five miles per hour faster than surrounding traffic. Additionally, the bill limits the speed of lane-splitting motorcycles to 20 mph.

            https://www.arnolditkin.com/blog/motor-vehicle-accidents/is-lane-splitting-legal-in-texas-/

            Lane Splitting Laws in Texas

            Currently under Section 545.060 of the Texas Transportation Code, all drivers and motorcyclists must drive within a single lane. For roadways that are divided into “two or more clearly marked lanes,” motorcyclists may change lanes, but may not drive between them.

            If you are caught lane splitting in Texas, you could face a ticket with a fine of $175 or more. Motorcyclists who violate the transportation code by lane splitting could also face citations for speeding, unsafe lane change, reckless driving, or following another vehicle too closely.

            https://www.fibichlaw.com/blog/is-lane-splitting-legal-in-texas-in-2020/ [fibichlaw.com]

            Penalties For Lane Splitting And Liable Parties In Lane Splitting Accidents

            Lane splitting in Texas can result in a number of penalties for violators because it is considered as illegal passing in the state. Texas law groups motorcycles in the same category as cars, which means they are subject to the same rules and regulations. A fine of $175 is normally the penalty for people who violate lane splitting rules.

            https://www.houstoncaraccidentlawyers.org/is-lane-splitting-legal-in-texas/ [houstoncaraccidentlawyers.org]

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @10:07PM (6 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @10:07PM (#1177314)

      I would have to see the video in question to form an opinion about who is right and who is wrong.

      someone in a car changes lanes

      You do realize that stop and go congestion does not relieve you of checking your mirrors before changing lanes?

      this guy is doing about 30 MPH lane splitting

      That isn't especially clear. Do you mean that he was moving 30 mph faster than traffic was going? Or, do you mean he was going 30 mph while traffic around him moved in spits and spurts?

      For example, there is no law dictating the maximum speed at which a motorcyclist can lane split. Guidelines and officers of the CHP have said a motorcyclist should be going no more than 10 miles per hour over the speed of other vehicles. So if slow-moving traffic on the freeway is inching along at 20 mph, a motorcyclist should not be lane splitting faster than 30 mph. Motorcyclists should never go above 50 mph while lane splitting.

      https://www.rodriguezlaw.net/lane-splitting-in-california/ [rodriguezlaw.net]

      So, I can't jump to the conclusion that the lane splitter is at fault - nor can I jump to a conclusion that the 4-wheeler is at fault. I've seen it done properly, and I've seen it done recklessly. Every case has to be evaluated on it's own merits.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @11:37PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, @11:37PM (#1177332)

        you really don't have to see the video. lane splitting is dangerous enough when traffic is stopped or crawling, but at 30mph (even if it is 20,30 or 30,40 differences) the fault would nearly always be shared.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 13, @03:06PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 13, @03:06PM (#1177433)

          It's less dangerous than being in that sort of traffic. You shouldn't be riding more than a few mph faster than traffic, but between heat stroke during summer and being rear ended any time of year, lane splitting jus definitely safer over all.

      • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Sunday September 12, @11:42PM (3 children)

        by tangomargarine (667) on Sunday September 12, @11:42PM (#1177335)

        Freeway stop and go traffic, this guy is doing about 30 MPH lane splitting and cutting in and out of traffic.

        That isn't especially clear. Do you mean that he was moving 30 mph faster than traffic was going? Or, do you mean he was going 30 mph while traffic around him moved in spits and spurts?

        "Stop and go" = traffic was ~motionless. He was going 30mph.

        https://www.rodriguezlaw.net/lane-splitting-in-california/ [rodriguezlaw.net]

        So, I can't jump to the conclusion that the lane splitter is at fault

        Did you read the entire article you linked?

        For example, there is no law dictating the maximum speed at which a motorcyclist can lane split. Guidelines and officers of the CHP have said a motorcyclist should be going no more than 10 miles per hour over the speed of other vehicles. So if slow-moving traffic on the freeway is inching along at 20 mph, a motorcyclist should not be lane splitting faster than 30 mph. Motorcyclists should never go above 50 mph while lane splitting. They should also split on the far left lane and avoid splitting next to large vehicles (buses, big rigs).

        --
        "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 13, @03:42AM (2 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 13, @03:42AM (#1177360)

          I think the point is that legally, in California, there is no limit besides the posted speed limit. So talking about this speed in terms of who is legally culpable doesn't seem to matter. And I doubt you want to use the CHP as an example of how to split your motorcycle on the freeway. I've been passed by CHP splitting at over 90mph in free moving traffic and well over 10mph faster in stop and go traffic. Most of the time I have to get out of the way of the CHP because they split at such high speed.

          Remove the element of splitting (which we've established is legal and isn't legally bound to certain speeds besides the posted speed limit) and consider a different scenario where a motorcycle is moving quickly in one lane when a car in a slower lane pulls in front the motorcycle in such a way that a collision is unavoidable. Legally speaking I believe the person making the lane change and causing the collision is at fault, regardless of how fast the motorcycle was going (up to the legal speed limit).

          • (Score: 2) by tangomargarine on Monday September 13, @04:46AM (1 child)

            by tangomargarine (667) on Monday September 13, @04:46AM (#1177364)

            I think the point is that legally, in California, there is no limit besides the posted speed limit. So talking about this speed in terms of who is legally culpable doesn't seem to matter.

            My overarching point is that, regardless of who is technically legally at fault, it is a dumbass idea to do in the first place, to go roaring up the line of basically parked cars, at 30mph (well okay, "roaring"...but still). Because each car you pass, the probability that one of them will do something unexpected ticks up with every one you pass.* And just the fact that this entire thing is illegal in every state *except* California is rather telling, isn't it? (Although personally, if told it were only legal in one state, I would've guessed Texas.)

            And I doubt you want to use the CHP as an example of how to split your motorcycle on the freeway. I've been passed by CHP splitting at over 90mph in free moving traffic and well over 10mph faster in stop and go traffic.

            Yes, even people in authority can be idiot drivers. You don't have to tell me; I live in Milwaukee* and the commuter highways are notionally 55mph speed limits...but of course most people completely ignore that. Just yesterday, I got passed by somebody who had to have been going at least 85 (I'll admit, I'm a bit of a leadfoot myself, but prevailing conditions; I'm not completely crazy).

            Do they not have the lane-width shoulders on the highways in CA? Near me I usually see the po-po cruising up the shoulder lane. Although we don't really have any motorcycle cops out here that I can recall.

            legal legally Legally at fault legal

            See above.

            *My motto since a year or two after moving out here is, "Assume at all times that any arbitrary driver you encounter on the road is purposely trying to hit you. If you assume everybody else is driving like a complete moron, you're significantly less likely to be surprised when you find somebody who actually is." The most common applications in my day-to-day life are when you're trying to turn onto a road and somebody decides to change-right into the curb lane right before you pull out, or somebody blows through an intersection in a turn-only lane. Aside from people just being dicks when you're trying to merge onto the freeway ofc.

            --
            "Is that really true?" "I just spent the last hour telling you to think for yourself! Didn't you hear anything I said?"
            • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Runaway1956 on Monday September 13, @05:58AM

              by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Monday September 13, @05:58AM (#1177370) Homepage Journal

              Do they not have the lane-width shoulders on the highways in CA?

              No one in their right mind drives on the breakdown lane, least of all motorcyclists. Every bit of trash that falls from (or is thrown from) passing traffic ends up in that breakdown lane. Small nuts and bolts, discarded snacks, broken glass and plastics, items of all description that fall off of trucks with unsecured loads, larger parts from collisions, purposely emptied trash containers, roadkill, mowing and pruning debris along with landscaping debris, and debris from construction/maintenance crews. Only in a real emergency would I consider riding on the shoulder for any distance.

              --
              Let's go Brandon!
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 13, @08:11AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 13, @08:11AM (#1177379)

    I use my iPhone when motorcycling for mapping. The biggest problem is it throwing an overheat warning when I keep it in my tank bag's clear plastic sleeve. I would wear it in a jogger's sleeve band which worked, but I now put it inside my tank bag to record my track and stop and check if I get lost.

    Camera recording I do with a gopro, either mounted to the handlebar with a lot of post processing to remove vibrations, or mounted on my chest for much less vibrations. Never would mount it to my helmet, as I think it would be a dangerous point load if I crashed.

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