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posted by martyb on Sunday October 17 2021, @05:15PM   Printer-friendly
from the how-does-that-compare-to-the-Cray-1? dept.

TSMC delivers first batch of Baikal BE-M1000 CPUs based on ARM Cortex-A57 cores

Baikal Electronics confirms they received the first batch of 5000 BE-M1000 CPUs from their foundry, TSMC. These are second-generation processors based on ARM architecture.

[...] Baikal BE-M1000 is based on eight ARM Cortex A57 cores all clocked up to 1.5 GHz at TDP at 30-35W. The CPU has 4MB of L2 cache and 8MB of L3 cache. It comes with an integrated ARM Mali-T682 GPU clocked at 700 to 750 MHz.

The processor offers a performance level of Intel Core i3-7300T, which should be good enough for standard office use.

The Intel Core i3-7300T was a dual-core Kaby Lake CPU launched in 2017, with a similar TDP (35 Watts).

Previously: Desktop and All-in-One Arm Linux Computers Launched with Baikal-M Processor

Related: Russia to Build RISC-V Processors for Laptops: 8-core, 2 GHz, 12nm, 2025


Original Submission

Related Stories

Russia to Build RISC-V Processors for Laptops: 8-core, 2 GHz, 12nm, 2025 15 comments

Russia To Build RISC-V Processors for Laptops: 8-core, 2 GHz, 12nm, 2025

Russian outlet Vedomosti.ru today is reporting that the conglomerate Rostec, a Russian state-backed corporation specializing in investment in technology, has penned a deal with server company Yadro and silicon design company Sintakor to develop RISC-V processors for computers, laptops, and servers. Initial reports are suggesting that Sintakor will develop a powerful enough RISC-V design to power government and education systems by 2025.

The cost of the project is reported to be around 30 billion rubles ($400m), with that the organizers of the project plan to sell 60,000 systems based around new processors containing RISC-V cores as the main processing cores. The reports state that the goal is to build an 8-core processor, running at 2 GHz, using a 12-nanometer process, which presumably means GlobalFoundries but at this point it is unclear. Out of the project funding, two-thirds will be provided by 'anchor customers' (such as Rostec and subsidiaries), while the final third will come from the federal budget. The systems these processors will go into will operate initially at Russia's Ministry of Education and Science, as well as the Ministry of Health.

Previously: Russian Homegrown Elbrus-4C CPU Released
Linux-Based, MIPS-Powered Russian All-in-One PC Launched
Programming Guide for Russia's "28nm" Elbrus-8CB CPU Published


Original Submission

Desktop and All-in-One Arm Linux Computers Launched with Baikal-M Processor 19 comments

Desktop and All-in-One Arm Linux computers launched with Baikal-M processor

The last time we wrote news about Baikal Electronics, the Russian company was offering MIPS-based processors, but they've now announced that several iRU-branded desktops and one all-in-one computer had been introduced with Baikal-M octa-core Cortex-A57 processor with Mali-T628 GPU, and support for up to 32GB DDR4 RAM, up to 3TB HDD.

The computers target the Russian market, especially business to business (B2B) and business to government (B2G) customers, with the use of Astra Linux distribution that contains Russian "data protection tools" such as ViPNet SafeBoot, PAK Sobol, and others.

[...] The all-in-one version of the computer pretty much has the same features with up to 32GB RAM, 1TB SSD, 3TB HDD, and a 23.8-inch IPS display with Full HD (1920 x 1080) resolution.

Related:
Linux-Based, MIPS-Powered Russian All-in-One PC Launched
Programming Guide for Russia's "28nm" Elbrus-8CB CPU Published
Russia to Build RISC-V Processors for Laptops: 8-core, 2 GHz, 12nm, 2025


Original Submission

BITBLAZE Titan BM15 Arm Linux Laptop Features Russian Baikal-M1 Processor 2 comments

BITBLAZE Titan BM15 Arm Linux laptop features Baikal-M1 processor

Russian company Prombit has unveiled the BITBLAZE Titan BM15 Arm Linux Laptop equipped with Baikal-M1 octa-core Arm Cortex-A57 processor manufactured by TSMC, up to 128GB RAM [disputed: may only be 32 GB], SSD storage, and a 15.6-inch Full HD display.

[...] There's no mention of the operating system used on the product page, but the laptop most certainly runs the same Astra Linux distribution as the Baikal M hardware launched last year with the Russian office application package, and other programs all approved by the "Ministry of Digital Development, Communications, and Mass Media".

However, the laptop may end up being a collector item, as Tom's Hardware reports TSMC will not manufacture chips for Russian companies due to current sanctions. But we'll have to see, as Chinese companies such as SMIC should still be able to manufacture processors on a 28nm process despite (again) more sanctions. Tom's Hardware further mentions that the laptop is expected to cost between 100,000 and 120,000 rubles (or about $1,600 – $1,930 at current exchange rates), so the price/performance ratio is less than impressive, but that may be the cost of independence. Productions samples, scheduled "earlier than November" may cost less.

Also at Notebookcheck.

Previously:
Desktop and All-in-One Arm Linux Computers Launched with Baikal-M Processor
TSMC Ships First Batch of Baikal BE-M1000 ARM CPUs


Original Submission

Russian Baikal 48-Core CPU Die Shots, Benchmarks Emerge (Vaporware) 12 comments

Russian Baikal 48-Core CPU Die Shots, Benchmarks Emerge

Twitter user Fritzchens Fritz has managed to obtain a sample of Baikal Electronics' 48-core BE-S1000 server-grade system-on-chip (SoC) and throw it under an infrared microscope to reveal its internals. In addition, some benchmark results of the SoC have surfaced.

Baikal Electronics has developed several system-on-chips for different devices to replace x86 processors from PCs and various compute appliances made in Russia. However, the pinnacle of the company's design prowess should have been its BE-S1000 server-grade SoC with 48 Arm Cortex-A75 cores, which the company managed to tape out and produce the first sample using TSMC's 16FFC fabrication technology, but which will never be released commercially due to sanctions against Russia for its invasion in Ukraine.

Also at TechPowerUp.

Previously:
TSMC Ships First Batch of Baikal BE-M1000 ARM CPUs
UK Sanctions Russian Microprocessor Makers, Banning Them From ARM
BITBLAZE Titan BM15 Arm Linux Laptop Features Russian Baikal-M1 Processor
Former Co-Owner of Russia's Baikal Microelectronics Goes Bankrupt


Original Submission

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  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 17 2021, @05:55PM (3 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 17 2021, @05:55PM (#1187763)

    I dedicate this post to my love Bettie, an inflatable sheep.

    • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 17 2021, @06:01PM (2 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 17 2021, @06:01PM (#1187764)

      bring your sheep...closer...that I may... merge with it..

      • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 17 2021, @06:02PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 17 2021, @06:02PM (#1187765)

        what does god need with an inflatable sheep?

        • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Mockingbird on Sunday October 17 2021, @10:23PM

          by Mockingbird (15239) on Sunday October 17 2021, @10:23PM (#1187801) Journal

          Excuse me, but you haven't answered his question.

  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 17 2021, @06:59PM (6 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 17 2021, @06:59PM (#1187776)

    The Intel Core i3-7300T was a dual-core Kaby Lake CPU launched in 2017, with a similar TDP (35 Watts).

    So the old ARM ISA offers no advantage in energy efficiency over the old Intel ISA?

    • (Score: 4, Informative) by takyon on Sunday October 17 2021, @07:37PM (2 children)

      by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Sunday October 17 2021, @07:37PM (#1187777) Journal

      Details are off.

      If the performance comparison is accurate, it means the multi-threaded performance of the 8-core Baikal matches the 2-core Intel chip. But the single-threaded performance would be much worse and that would be perceived while doing various tasks.

      The i3-7300T is made on Intel's 14nm node with FinFET transistors, while the Baikal chip is made on less efficient but cheap TSMC 28nm.

      The easier thing to compare it to might be the Raspberry Pi 4. The Pi 4 uses 4x Cortex-A72 at the same clock speed. A72 is the successor to the A57, and should use about 80% of the power at the same clock speed. So 8x Cortex-A57 on the same 28nm node (not sure which foundry for Pi 4) should be 2.5x the power consumption, although that could be inaccurate for various reasons. The Pi 4 SoC isn't drawing 12-14 Watts by itself.

      The Mali GPU is running at a higher clock speed than Pi 4's GPU. It's an 8-core Mali-T628 GPU [baikalelectronics.com] (not 682), which is the most cores that one can have.

      Baikal's page says "Estimated TDP below 30 W". Maybe that TDP encompasses some of the other features, like the 10 Gb Ethernet controllers.

      In conclusion, this thing is a nice industrial-grade ARM chip, and you should definitely loot a Baikal-M workstation from a nearby Russian office when you get the opportunity.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday October 19 2021, @09:17PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday October 19 2021, @09:17PM (#1188582)

        But what's the upload speed of my commercial secrets to the Russian govt?

    • (Score: 2) by driverless on Monday October 18 2021, @07:30AM (2 children)

      by driverless (4770) on Monday October 18 2021, @07:30AM (#1187923)

      That was my response as well, so they're finally catching up with Intel in terms of energy inefficiency?

      • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Monday October 18 2021, @09:14AM (1 child)

        by FatPhil (863) <{pc-soylent} {at} {asdf.fi}> on Monday October 18 2021, @09:14AM (#1187935) Homepage
        But this isn't "finally catching up", it's "even when massively hamstrung". Those A57's are ancient cores. The successor A72/A73 came out half a decade ago and provide better grunt per watt as they use fewer watts, and the successor of those, that A75/A76 came out 3 years ago and provide better grunt per watt by providing way more grunt - those are the better comparison generation-wise to the Intel Cores. And they're not even the cutting edge, there are several incremental improvements since then. In particular, you should be looking out for smaller processes, these are legacy (you're comparing TSMC's 28nm with Intel's "14nm" (which in reality is about 20nm, but still, a 2x density)).

        I can only hope that these Baikals are as cheap as dirt, as otherwise, they're lacking a USP.
        --
        Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
        • (Score: 2) by fraxinus-tree on Monday October 18 2021, @12:12PM

          by fraxinus-tree (5590) on Monday October 18 2021, @12:12PM (#1187958)

          Baikals are not cheap at any rate, they are expensive as hell. The main reason Russians make these is because they want hardware they can trust in order to use it in military and related applications. This is also why these CPUs are made using somewhat older technology - the chips need to be simple enough and visible enough in order to be auditable. KGB and Politburo and comrade Stalin in particular (yes, I know they call them otherwise these days) are ok with '2000s performance at '1970s price as long as they know who is exactly responsible for the eventual security issues.

  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 18 2021, @01:12AM (3 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday October 18 2021, @01:12AM (#1187833)

    After the sanctions on huawei, I'd be surprised if the next major gen of this is still arm based. And, I kind of hope it is not. If the Chinese state puts its support behind an alternative, we might end up with a risc-v or other open ISA with reasonable performance (and reasonable power consumption [looking at you power9]). And, it might end up in products for export, eventually. Bonus points if it doesn't include an intel ME / amd PSP work-alike. Bonus bonus points if any drivers for devices in the SoC are mainlined / and boards using it have mainline uboot support (or, at least, a free and open bootloader).

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Monday October 18 2021, @02:30AM

      by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Monday October 18 2021, @02:30AM (#1187861) Journal

      I think stealing the latest ARM designs is also an option on the table. The bigger problem is that China and Russia need to have their own advanced fabs, and possibly their own EUV or beyond-EUV equipment.

      If you look at the related story, you can see that there's a plan for 8-core RISC-V chips from some different companies, but they won't materialize until at least 2025.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by takyon on Monday October 18 2021, @07:46AM (1 child)

      by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Monday October 18 2021, @07:46AM (#1187925) Journal

      Someone posted the roadmap in the comments. The Baikal-M2 is planned to use a "6nm" node, with 8x Cortex-A710 cores at 3 GHz.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday October 19 2021, @09:22PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday October 19 2021, @09:22PM (#1188584)

        6nm hand-soldered by the children of the political opposition.

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