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posted by janrinok on Thursday May 12, @07:31PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the but-can-it-run-Crysis? dept.

Tachyum's Monster 128 Core 5.7GHz 'Universal Processor' Does Everything

Tachyum has created one of the most powerful processors in the world: The Prodigy T16128 Universal Processor. The Prodigy T16128 has 128 64-bit CPU cores operating at up to 5.7GHz, 16 DDR5 memory controllers, and 64 PCIe 5.0 lanes, and can handle general-purpose computing, high-performance computing (HPC), and AI workloads — all on a single chip.

Tachyum calls Prodigy the world's first "universal processor," and says it was designed from the ground up to be a multi-purpose CPU capable of running a multitude of the world's most intensive computing applications. Prodigy not only handles all of these different tasks on a single chip, it does so with a power budget that's 10 times lower than that of traditional hardware — and at one-third the cost.

Tachyum boldly claims the Prodigy supercomputer chip offers four times the performance of Intel's fastest Xeon on the market and triple the raw performance of Nvidia's H100 in high-performance computing applications. All while being 10 times more power efficient.

To create such impressive performance within a single core architecture, Tachyum says it built Prodigy with matrix and vector processing capabilities from the ground up — rather than making them an afterthought. Prodigy supports a range of data types, including FP64, FP32, TF32, BF16, Int8, FP8, and TAI, all from the individual CPU cores themselves.

[...] The Prodigy T16128 runs on a 5nm process technology of unknown origin, and operates within a very small (for the power it provides) 64 mm x 84mm FCLGA package. Tachyum says the chip is capable of performing 12 AI PetaFLOPS and 90 TeraFLOPS when it comes to HPC workloads. The Prodigy chip can also run binaries for x86, ARM, RISC-V, and ISA. For some perspective, a single Nvidia A100 is only capable of 5 AI PetaFLOPS.

And, to answer the question posed earlier: from theverge.com

But can it run Crysis? The answer is now yes, no matter what PC you own. Nvidia is bringing Crysis Remastered to its GeForce Now streaming service this week, alongside Crysis Remastered Trilogy, Crysis 2 Remastered, and Crysis 3 Remastered.


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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @07:38PM (6 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @07:38PM (#1244520)

    All those specs up there and nothing on actual wattage

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @08:23PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @08:23PM (#1244543)

      The wattage is remarkable... on paper, just like the processor itself.

    • (Score: 2, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @09:03PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @09:03PM (#1244579)

      Imagine a Beowulf cluster of these!!!

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @10:31PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @10:31PM (#1244603)

      Well code-morphing Transmeta and Nvidia's Denver were designed for battery powered devices.

      And it's running on a much smaller price that you $55 RPi 4, so performance per watt comparisons are going to be off the scale.

      But I suspect it will still generate enough radiant heat to warm a remote Alaskan village in which they put the data center full on the things.

    • (Score: 2) by driverless on Friday May 13, @06:15AM

      by driverless (4770) on Friday May 13, @06:15AM (#1244684)

      Or price.

      My suspicion is that it'll be significantly more expensive than several discrete processors that do one thing well rather than an all-in-one mashup that does everything sort-of-OKish.

    • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Friday May 13, @03:19PM

      More efficient at generating vapour per unit hype?

      "Production starts in 2023, so we should see actual benchmarks of these chips sometime next year."

      Which seems to under-estimate how difficult it is to create a bug-free processor. My bet would be "2024/5 or never".
      --
      I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @07:45PM (22 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @07:45PM (#1244524)

    Windows 10?
    I have a i7 and it takes a half hour for windows to stop doing all it's background shit. Not usable until then.

    • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Azuma Hazuki on Thursday May 12, @07:53PM (11 children)

      by Azuma Hazuki (5086) Subscriber Badge on Thursday May 12, @07:53PM (#1244532) Journal

      That's not your i7's fault. That's entirely on Windows. Try Linux on that machine, especially with a lighter desktop like Xfce, and you'll be absolutely blown way at how quick it runs :)

      --
      I am "that girl" your mother warned you about...
      • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Thursday May 12, @08:51PM (6 children)

        by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Thursday May 12, @08:51PM (#1244571) Journal

        Intel should run an ad cam pain. "Don't blame us! Blame Microsoft!"

        --
        While in an airport, never use the word "balm".
        • (Score: 2, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @09:01PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @09:01PM (#1244577)

          ...afte that they can drink cham pain.

        • (Score: 4, Funny) by driverless on Friday May 13, @06:19AM (4 children)

          by driverless (4770) on Friday May 13, @06:19AM (#1244685)

          "Don't blame us! Blame Microsoft!"

          Should we blame the government?
          Or blame society?
          Or should we blame the Intel CPU?
          No, blame Microsoft, blame Microsoft
          We need to form a full assault
          It's Microsoft's fault

          • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Friday May 13, @01:46PM (3 children)

            by Freeman (732) on Friday May 13, @01:46PM (#1244724) Journal

            "When in doubt, reboot.", is a thing, because Microsoft. Generally the most sane thing to do when you're having trouble with X thing is reboot to see, if that takes care of the problem. Why? Because Windows is Stupid. Once you've got that taken care of, if it's not a peripheral, you can also rule out, "Is it plugged in?", which is a common gotcha. Seriously, even smart people have issues with that sometimes. I turn it on and it works. Why isn't it working? Call IT, they'll figure it out. Ah, I see the problem here, you didn't plug in the label printer. Seriously though, no matter how much wishing, hoping, and troubleshooting you do. It won't work without power.

            --
            Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
            • (Score: 3, Informative) by driverless on Friday May 13, @02:13PM (2 children)

              by driverless (4770) on Friday May 13, @02:13PM (#1244729)

              It's actually slightly more complicated than just rebooting, specifically you have the three R's of Microsoft/Windows support:

              Retry.
              Reboot.
              Reinstall.

              • (Score: 3, Insightful) by DannyB on Friday May 13, @02:28PM (1 child)

                by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Friday May 13, @02:28PM (#1244737) Journal

                Not Three R's. Four R's:

                Retry
                Reboot
                Reinstall
                Return the PC for a Replacement
                Replace the PC with a new one
                Replace the OS with a different one

                --
                While in an airport, never use the word "balm".
                • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Friday May 13, @02:56PM

                  by Freeman (732) on Friday May 13, @02:56PM (#1244748) Journal

                  Ah, going with the Microsoft counting method, 'eh? Or was that the Monty Python Counting Method? 1, 2, 5! No, 3 Sir! 3! I'm surprised they didn't have a debate about the correction.

                  --
                  Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
      • (Score: 2) by Subsentient on Friday May 13, @02:52AM

        by Subsentient (1111) Subscriber Badge on Friday May 13, @02:52AM (#1244653) Homepage Journal

        This is very true. I'm running Fedora 36 with XFCE 4.16, Fedora being considered one of the slower distributions, and it still absolutely wipes the floor with even Windows 7 in resource usage and snappiness.

        --
        "It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society." -Jiddu Krishnamurti
      • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Friday May 13, @03:23PM (2 children)

        And then you start chromium on that linux setup, and it all grinds to a halt again.
        My 4G i7-ish laptop currently has a chromium process that *starts* with memory maps spanning 38GB.
        --
        I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
        • (Score: 2) by Subsentient on Friday May 13, @03:43PM (1 child)

          by Subsentient (1111) Subscriber Badge on Friday May 13, @03:43PM (#1244768) Homepage Journal

          I use Firefox, which while it doesn't have *great* resource usage, is certainly better than Chromium or Chrome.

          --
          "It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society." -Jiddu Krishnamurti
          • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Friday May 13, @03:55PM

            On that machine I have one bank of tabs that I interact with in Firefox, and another bank of tabs that I merely refer to in Chromium. I think I split them because Firefox was utterly unusable hosting all of them. And I didn't want to move them all over to Chromium as I haven't got chromium as locked down as well as I have firefox. The nice thing is that I can kill half of the tabs with one killall, or the other half of the tabs with another killall, I don't have to run both sets unless I need to.
            --
            I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
    • (Score: 4, Funny) by Freeman on Thursday May 12, @07:56PM (5 children)

      by Freeman (732) on Thursday May 12, @07:56PM (#1244534) Journal

      My main thought is this "Do you have an SSD?", because a lot of that slow loading and junk is due to a very slow HDD. Sure, you'll still have the standard windows bloat, but you won't also be waiting on a spinning platter.

      --
      Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @10:43PM (2 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @10:43PM (#1244604)

        Can confirm. My employer-provided Windows 10 laptop is equipped with a 256GB nvme disk, it takes more than 20 minutes after login for the fans in my laptop to go quiet again. Before that, it's telemetry, antivirus, IT policies, updates, onedrive, and whatnot that's keeping my machine busy.

        The only thing the nvme disk adds is that I can still perform some work while the OS is busy pulling itself together.

        • (Score: 2) by Gaaark on Friday May 13, @12:13PM

          by Gaaark (41) on Friday May 13, @12:13PM (#1244712) Journal

          Holy fork!
          What a piece of shirt Windows is!

          --
          --- Please remind me if I haven't been civil to you: I'm channeling MDC. ---Gaaark 2.0 ---
        • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Friday May 13, @01:41PM

          by Freeman (732) on Friday May 13, @01:41PM (#1244723) Journal

          Ah, you're partially suffering from Laptopitis, they suck horrifically when it comes to heat management. Yet, here I am using a work supplied Intel NUC, which arguably has worse heat management than most laptops. Fan is going constantly, no matter, if something is happening. Shouldn't take 20 minutes for IT stuff, etc. Sure, Windows Updates can seriously take a good bit of time, but so long as you're not dealing with that, it shouldn't be that bad. It could just be taking the fan that long to get everything cool enough to slowdown, which makes a lot more sense.

          --
          Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
      • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @10:47PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @10:47PM (#1244605)

        It never ceases to amaze how features that are standard on other OSes remain non-existent on Windows. In this case pretty much every other OS knows not to start every app at the same time, but Windows will happily do so.

      • (Score: 3, Touché) by epitaxial on Friday May 13, @02:22AM

        by epitaxial (3165) on Friday May 13, @02:22AM (#1244647)

        Windows doing updates makes an SSD feel like a 5400 rpm platter drive.

    • (Score: 4, Interesting) by vux984 on Thursday May 12, @09:52PM (2 children)

      by vux984 (5045) on Thursday May 12, @09:52PM (#1244597)

      I also have an i7 and i can reboot and be at the desktop login screen in under 30 seconds. And after logging in the desktop is properly usable (all the tray icons and startup items for onedrive, logitech, backblaze, 2 instances of teams, discord, outlook, and other half dozen odds and ends) within another 1 minute or so. My system isn't an antique yet -- 8th generation i7, but that's also not remotely new anymore either.

      I expect your CPU is not likely the problem here, and that either you don't have enough RAM, or your hard drive is slow-as-sin, or there is something pretty wrong with your install or multiple of the above. My son runs my old 6th generation i7 and its perfectly snappy too.

      • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Friday May 13, @01:50PM (1 child)

        by Freeman (732) on Friday May 13, @01:50PM (#1244725) Journal

        I have a Ryzen 5 3600 with 16GB(or 32GB I forget how much I ponied up for) of RAM with a 1TB NvME. Sucker boots very fast. It takes about 30 seconds for NZXT CAM (temp/fan monitoring), Discord, Skype, Steam, GOG Galaxy, and a few other things to load. That's with me manually entering the Steam password, so I don't forget it.

        --
        Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
        • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Friday May 13, @01:52PM

          by Freeman (732) on Friday May 13, @01:52PM (#1244726) Journal

          The RAM is DDR4 3600mhz, which was pretty sweet when I got it. Now it's a bit more middle of the road.

          --
          Forced Microsoft Account for Windows Login → Switch to Linux.
    • (Score: 2, Informative) by higuita on Friday May 13, @01:22AM

      by higuita (2465) on Friday May 13, @01:22AM (#1244641)

      hey, it is your fault... stopping using windows will fix that problem...

  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by dltaylor on Thursday May 12, @08:04PM (1 child)

    by dltaylor (4693) on Thursday May 12, @08:04PM (#1244536)

    If there's not going to be any silicon until 2023, how much of the performance is "expectations"?

    We can simulate a great many things CPUs do, but these claims do need some verification. What fab, even in deepest, darkest secure Area 51 is producing 5nm features on 4 cm2 of silicon?

    I question the power requirements most of all. How much current does it take to drive a DDR5 interface? A hundred watts? Now run 16 of them simultaneously. PCIe is not free in terms of power, either. Perhaps, which we will see when we can get one, the total power draw of all cores active, running programs from cache, will be 1/10 of 128 cores worth of Xeon or Epic.

    In terms of being the "first universal processor", that claim ignores a lot of history. A 68040 could make that claim, since it could run, in simulation, the ISA of every processor available at the time. Itaniums probably could have, since there was x86 emulation to allow Windows binaries to be used, given the dearth of Itanium binaries.

    I would bet my house that a Z-series (probably Power) can do it, too.

    • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Friday May 13, @03:43PM

      > What fab, even in deepest, darkest secure Area 51 is producing 5nm features on 4 cm2 of silicon?

      "is" is not necessary, for the vapourous reasons you mention.

      How does it compare to the M1 with moar coars? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_M1_Pro_and_M1_Max
      I can't see die sizes for those anywhere, but they're way bigger than the mobile cores, so 4cm^2 seems possible.
      The Ultra variant listed at wackypedia will almost certainly beat this vapourware to market, and that surely must top what you're looking for.
      --
      I know I'm God, because every time I pray to him, I find I'm talking to myself.
  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @08:07PM (3 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @08:07PM (#1244538)

    TFA: "Production starts in 2023, so we should see actual benchmarks of these chips sometime next year."
    dnb.com: "Tachyum, Inc. has 30 total employees across all of its locations and generates $5.13 million in sales (USD)."
    Conclusion: pump and dump.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @08:13PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 12, @08:13PM (#1244539)

      So... pretty much like the 100+ core matchbox CPU a decade ago that never came to fruition.

    • (Score: 4, Interesting) by Mojibake Tengu on Thursday May 12, @09:15PM

      by Mojibake Tengu (8598) Subscriber Badge on Thursday May 12, @09:15PM (#1244587) Journal

      They are officially selling prototypes to pre-approved partners only.

      Planned tape-out of Prodigy platform is already 2 years delayed.

      The owner, Radoslav Danilák, worked for Nvidia, and on Tianhe-1A, created two startups already and sold them to LSI and Western Digital. I'd call that industrial espionage.

      I do not expect any output to the market, ever. The business is mostly based on milking Slovak government for funding.

      --
      The edge of 太玄 cannot be defined, for it is beyond every aspect of design
    • (Score: 2) by HiThere on Friday May 13, @12:23AM

      by HiThere (866) on Friday May 13, @12:23AM (#1244619) Journal

      "Pump and dump" may be too harsh, but it definitely sounds rather speculative. It's probably VC bait.

      --
      Javascript is what you use to allow unknown third parties to run software you have no idea about on your computer.
  • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Thursday May 12, @08:34PM (6 children)

    by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Thursday May 12, @08:34PM (#1244551) Journal

    Did I miss this in TFA? Did they mention what instruction set this runs?

    --
    While in an airport, never use the word "balm".
    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Thursday May 12, @08:36PM (3 children)

      by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Thursday May 12, @08:36PM (#1244554) Journal

      Digging more deepfully... [tachyum.com] it runs:

      Runs binaries for x86, Arm, and RISC-V in addition to native ISA

      --
      While in an airport, never use the word "balm".
      • (Score: 2) by Rich on Thursday May 12, @08:40PM (2 children)

        by Rich (945) on Thursday May 12, @08:40PM (#1244560) Journal

        Haha. Datasheet. "Datasheet!". They have the chutzpah to call their sorry advertising leaflet a "datasheet".

        • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Thursday May 12, @08:50PM (1 child)

          by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Thursday May 12, @08:50PM (#1244570) Journal

          Ya wanna data sheet? Herez a data sheet! [baldengineer.com] Note that the Vff pin must be supplied 6.3 VAC.

          It is not data who wants to be free. It is his brother who wants to be free.

          --
          While in an airport, never use the word "balm".
          • (Score: 2) by Rich on Friday May 13, @12:39AM

            by Rich (945) on Friday May 13, @12:39AM (#1244625) Journal

            Clearly recognizable as a joke! They thought of the drain tap, but forgot the cooling water feed.

            ps. I was slightly shocked that I figured out what the ff in Vff means before I even read "Vff", by the voltage alone, but I swear I'm not that old, I just, ...er... happen to come across some vintage music gear.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 13, @03:34AM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 13, @03:34AM (#1244661)

      They don't know yet what "instruction set" means. But don't worry, this is not a big issue, it will support any instruction set user wants! Preorder now!

  • (Score: 2) by MIRV888 on Thursday May 12, @09:48PM

    by MIRV888 (11376) on Thursday May 12, @09:48PM (#1244595)

    The marketing team is top notch.
    Does it come with a free trial cd?

  • (Score: 2) by datapharmer on Friday May 13, @02:07AM (2 children)

    by datapharmer (2702) Subscriber Badge on Friday May 13, @02:07AM (#1244644)

    I must be getting old because this just sounds like what Transmeta was claiming 20 years ago. VLIW and 'run any instruction set' code morphing type tech... it checks all the boxes of history repeating itself. I don't know, maybe in two decades of reflection they fixed the lack of memory protection and missing MMU and solved the speed penalty of translation, but I'm skeptical to say the least.

    • (Score: 2) by jb on Friday May 13, @02:58AM

      by jb (338) on Friday May 13, @02:58AM (#1244655)

      I must be getting old because this just sounds like what Transmeta was claiming 20 years ago ... 'run any instruction set' code morphing type tech

      Didn't ICL have a machine like that way back in the '70s?

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 13, @03:38AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 13, @03:38AM (#1244662)

      Google Stadia will revolutionze gaming! This is Totally New Idea Nobody Tried Before!

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 13, @09:05AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 13, @09:05AM (#1244694)

    The F35 of CPUs

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