Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

posted by janrinok on Friday December 02, @10:17PM   Printer-friendly
from the privacy-theater dept.

South Dakota Bans Government Employees From Using TikTok. The Countless Other Apps And Services That Hoover Up And Sell Sensitive Data Are Fine, Though:

South Dakota Bans Government Employees From Using TikTok. The Countless Other Apps And Services That Hoover Up And Sell Sensitive Data Are Fine, Though

South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem put on a bit of a performance this week by announcing that the state would be banning government employees from installing TikTok on their phones. The effort, according to the Governor, is supposed to counter the national security risk of TikTok sharing consumer data with the Chinese government:

"South Dakota will have no part in the intelligence gathering operations of nations who hate us," said Governor Kristi Noem. "The Chinese Communist Party uses information that it gathers on TikTok to manipulate the American people, and they gather data off the devices that access the platform."

Of course, this being the post-truth era, the fact that there's no actual evidence that China has even been able to exploit TikTok to manipulate Americans at any meaningful scale is just... not mentioned.

Fears that Chinese-based TikTok owner ByteDance could share U.S. consumer data with the Chinese government are at least based on reality. But as we've noted a few times now, the hyperbolic bloviation by many TikTok hysterics on the right (FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr comes quickly to mind) isn't occurring in good faith, and their solution (ban TikTok) doesn't address the actual underlying issue.

As in, the policymakers freaking out about the Chinese potentially getting access to TikTok user data are the exact same people who've fought tooth and nail against the U.S. having even a baseline privacy law for the Internet era. These are the exact same folks that created a data broker privacy hellscape completely free of accountability, and advocated for the dismantling of most, if not all, regulatory oversight of the sector. The result: just an endless parade of scandals, hacks, and breaches.

Now those exact same folks are breathlessly concerned when just one of countless bad actors (China) abuse a zero-accountability privacy hellscape they themselves helped to create.


Original Submission

This discussion was created by janrinok (52) for logged-in users only, but now has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
Display Options Threshold/Breakthrough Mark All as Read Mark All as Unread
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
(1)
  • (Score: 2) by Frosty Piss on Friday December 02, @10:38PM (2 children)

    by Frosty Piss (4971) on Friday December 02, @10:38PM (#1280969)

    They might be able to do it with Work Phones (and in my opinion it's a good idea), but I don't think it will fly with personal phones.

    • (Score: 2) by Spamalope on Friday December 02, @11:17PM

      by Spamalope (5233) on Friday December 02, @11:17PM (#1280970) Homepage

      Yep. This is a ban on Tictok where you shouldn't have any of its competitors either...
      --
      Politicians should grandstand differently though:
      China; we'll consider allowing Tictok when you do! End the ban on Tictok use within China!
      Clearly China is so concerned they've banned the app.
      --

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 03, @12:19AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 03, @12:19AM (#1280973)

      I would assume this is work-phones. That said for many people they are probably more or less interchangeable. Could it change for your private phone? For most of the employees probably not, but if you hold some kind of job with a security clearance running unapproved apps could be frowned upon and have consequences.

  • (Score: 2) by Spamalope on Friday December 02, @11:43PM (3 children)

    by Spamalope (5233) on Friday December 02, @11:43PM (#1280972) Homepage

    Do we have a credible explanation of why China bans the app?

    • (Score: 2, Informative) by linuxrocks123 on Saturday December 03, @03:40AM (1 child)

      by linuxrocks123 (2557) on Saturday December 03, @03:40AM (#1280980) Journal

      They ban Google, Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, and almost all Western news websites. Since their Google ban extends to Google Play, all their Android phones are bastardized creations that use a third party app store.

      Of course they ban TikTok. Yeah, the company is Chinese, but China has its head so far up its own ass that it would be completely impossible to run a social media website that Westerners would want to use and that China would allow its subjects to use. So, ByteDance chose to make TikTok part of the free Internet and to create a clone called Douyin for the shitty censored Chinese Internet, which is quickly becoming just a bigger version of Kwangmyong.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 03, @04:03AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 03, @04:03AM (#1280984)

        and to create a clone called Douyin

        1) Douyin was before TikTok
        2) TikTok is not really a clone of Douyin.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by canopic jug on Sunday December 04, @08:25AM

      by canopic jug (3949) on Sunday December 04, @08:25AM (#1281107) Journal

      China doesn't ban the app. It just has a completely different one for domestic use.

      There are two versions of TikTok, one for domestic use and one to wage war [cbsnews.com] on the other nations' youths. The domestic version limits access by kids to no more than 40 minutes per day and even then they only have access to educational material like science experiment videos, "history" videos, and such. The export version, which is what kids in the EU and the US are exposed to, not only has no time limit but is designed for maximum engagement (addiction) [nih.gov] in addition to content which is time wasting at best and, more often, destructive to physical and/or mental heath [washingtonpost.com]. CBS used the metaphors of spinach versus opium.

      Yeah, WWIII has been going at a slow burn for a while now. It's just that most individuals are too caught up in its tools to notice and even most of those that do kind of notice remain in denial about the nature of the "apps" on their and their kids smartphones.

      --
      Money is not free speech. Elections should not be auctions.
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 03, @04:58PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 03, @04:58PM (#1281028)
    No really, tell us how you feel. Don’t hide behind that journalistic impartiality.
  • (Score: 2) by Username on Sunday December 04, @09:57AM (1 child)

    by Username (4557) on Sunday December 04, @09:57AM (#1281112)

    I would rather have american companies spying on our politicians instead of chinese ones.

    Leftist website taking a shot at a republican, who would have thought. They'd probably throw a russa,russa,russa fit if a politician installed and used the russian VK app, though.

    • (Score: 2) by canopic jug on Monday December 05, @04:44AM

      by canopic jug (3949) on Monday December 05, @04:44AM (#1281220) Journal

      Well, even though Bytedance is up front about being a surveillance and propaganda company, very few of the articles covering it or TikTok ever mention that fact. It's almost like a quick skim through social media is what passes for journalism these days.

      --
      Money is not free speech. Elections should not be auctions.
(1)