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posted by janrinok on Sunday May 21 2023, @10:51PM   Printer-friendly

Iowa State researchers in psychology and engineering found women experience cybersickness with virtual reality headsets more often than men:

Psychology professor Jonathan Kelly studies human computer interaction, spatial cognition and virtual reality. He says gender discrepancies in cybersickness may not seem that important when it's related to video games and other forms of entertainment.

"But it's still a problem, and when VR gets to the point where it's a bigger part of job training or education in a classroom, it's even more important to make sure people can access this technology. If not, a lot of people are going to get left out, and there could be a backlash," says Kelly.

Like motion sickness, cybersickness can occur when there's a mismatch between visual motion and body motion. Symptoms, including nausea, dizziness, headaches and eye fatigue, usually resolve quickly after removing the headset. But in severe cases, they sometimes last for hours.

[...] As part of a larger study on adaptation to cybersickness, the ISU researchers recruited 150 participants to play up to 20 minutes of a VR game with a headset. The participants were new to VR and could stop if they felt too sick to continue. The researchers found women ended the game early twice as often as men and reported a sickness intensity that was 40% higher.

[...] For the second paper, the researchers explored whether the distance between an individual's pupils could help explain the gender difference in cybersickness. VR headsets have an adjustable lens set-up to accommodate different users, but some people fall outside the range. The researchers found women participants on average had smaller distances between their pupils than men, but it did not predict whether they would get cybersick during the game.

What seemed to matter more was whether they had previous experience with motion sickness or screen sickness (e.g., feeling sick in movie theaters, while playing a video game.)

"Women reported experiencing more motion sickness and screen-based sickness than men, and this increased susceptibility is part of the reason that women experience more cybersickness," says Kelly.

Journal References:
    J. W. Kelly, S. B. Gilbert, M. C. Dorneich and K. A. Costabile, "Gender differences in cybersickness: Clarifying confusion and identifying paths forward," 2023 IEEE Conference on Virtual Reality and 3D User Interfaces Abstracts and Workshops (VRW), Shanghai, China, 2023, pp. 283-288, doi: 10.1109/VRW58643.2023.00067
    T. A. Doty, J. W. Kelly, M. C. Dorneich and S. B. Gilbert, "Does interpupillary distance (IPD) relate to immediate cybersickness?," 2023 IEEE Conference on Virtual Reality and 3D User Interfaces Abstracts and Workshops (VRW), Shanghai, China, 2023, pp. 661-662, doi: 10.1109/VRW58643.2023.00173


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  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by Thexalon on Sunday May 21 2023, @11:42PM

    by Thexalon (636) on Sunday May 21 2023, @11:42PM (#1307266)

    1. Make something up.
    2. Do studies on the alleged characteristics on the thing you just made up.

    "Cybersickness" is apparently the age-old trick of taking something already known to exist, and adding "with a computer". So in this case, "motion sickness, with a computer".

    --
    The only thing that stops a bad guy with a compiler is a good guy with a compiler.
  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by legont on Sunday May 21 2023, @11:46PM (1 child)

    by legont (4179) on Sunday May 21 2023, @11:46PM (#1307267)

    They did not define what woman is.

    --
    "Wealth is the relentless enemy of understanding" - John Kenneth Galbraith.
    • (Score: 3, Funny) by darkfeline on Monday May 22 2023, @01:02AM

      by darkfeline (1030) on Monday May 22 2023, @01:02AM (#1307276) Homepage

      Obviously women are people who identify as being affected by cybersickness.

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  • (Score: 2) by takyon on Monday May 22 2023, @01:35AM

    by takyon (881) <{takyon} {at} {soylentnews.org}> on Monday May 22 2023, @01:35AM (#1307279) Journal

    The participants were new to VR and could stop if they felt too sick to continue. The researchers found women ended the game early twice as often as men and reported a sickness intensity that was 40% higher.

    At least until Matrix-style "jacking in" [fandom.com] with no (unwanted) motion sickness is all the rage.

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  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Monday May 22 2023, @11:42AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday May 22 2023, @11:42AM (#1307309)

    Tfa claims, "Symptoms, including nausea, dizziness, headaches and eye fatigue, usually resolve quickly after removing the headset. But in severe cases, they sometimes last for hours."

    I've been in driving simulators since the 1960s (I was a lucky kid, the first one was electro-mechanical, extremely crude by modern standards). Never really had any motion sickness or simulator sickness as it later became known.

    Then, about 10 years ago, I found out the hard way. I was driving a high quality physics dev system -- 120 Hz screen, physics never more than one refresh late. When the nausea hit it first crept up a little and could be ignored. Then there was a specific scenario on-screen and it hit me almost instantly. Didn't quite vomit, but nearly...and I felt queasy for about 24 hours.

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