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posted by hubie on Sunday May 12, @05:34AM   Printer-friendly
from the what-happens-in-a-black-hole-stays-in-a-black-hole dept.

Fall into a black hole in mind-bending NASA animation (video)

"If you have the choice, you want to fall into a supermassive black hole."

If you've ever wondered what would happen if you were unlucky enough to fall into a black hole, NASA has your answer.

A visualization created on a NASA supercomputer to celebrate the beginning of black hole week on Monday (May 6) takes the viewer on a one-way plunge beyond the event horizon of a black hole.

This outer boundary of a black hole marks the point at which not even light moves fast enough to escape the black hole's intense gravitational pull. That means the event horizon, marked by a golden ring outside of the heart of the black hole, is the point of no return past which no distant observer can ever recover information.

[....] What is interesting is that if you have the choice of what black hole to tumble into, bigger is better.

"If you have the choice, you want to fall into a supermassive black hole," Schnittman said. "Stellar-mass black holes, which contain up to about 30 solar masses, possess much smaller event horizons and stronger tidal forces, which can rip apart approaching objects before they get to the horizon."

[....] The more mass a black hole has, the further from its singularity its event horizon is located. That means with a supermassive black hole, an infalling astronaut would have the chance to pass the event horizon before meeting their grisly fate.

[....] After a real-time duration of around 3 hours and 30-minute during two orbits of the black hole, we reach its event horizon. This marks the last point at which any distant observer watching our descent would be able to see us. They would forever see our image at the very edge of the event horizon, frozen.

[... rest omitted...]

No information was harmed in the posting of this article.


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  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 12, @05:39AM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday May 12, @05:39AM (#1356625)

    This might be a good place to ask, a long-ish time ago I saw a request for computer-science-y types to help out with the Physics of Everything library -- specifically, optimize the code written by the Physics types.

    Does anyone have a link to physics libraries? LHC libraries, CERN code, whatever is used to create stuff like this? I'd like to take a look, and maybe contribute.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by janrinok on Sunday May 12, @06:20AM

      by janrinok (52) Subscriber Badge on Sunday May 12, @06:20AM (#1356627) Journal

      https://github.com/topics/physics [github.com] - "Here are 5,616 public repositories matching this topic..".

      might be a place to start.

      --
      I am not interested in knowing who people are or where they live. My interest starts and stops at our servers.
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by Unixnut on Sunday May 12, @12:33PM

      by Unixnut (5779) on Sunday May 12, @12:33PM (#1356649)

      You can have a look at the Astrophysics Source Code Library [ascl.net]. They list a lot of libraries with links, and most of them are open source and probably would not mind contributions.

  • (Score: 4, Informative) by gnuman on Sunday May 12, @07:29AM (2 children)

    by gnuman (5013) on Sunday May 12, @07:29AM (#1356628)

    Once the event horizon is crossed, it is a one-way trip to the central singularity of the black hole, the infinitesimally small point of infinite density at which all the physics of the known universe break down.

    Let's say this is one giant assumption here, even more so than the Dark Matter or Dark Energy ideas. If you plug in assumed mass of universe into equation for size of black holel, you may find that we are living in a black hole?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Schwarzschild_radius#A_possible_reference_for_the_Schwartzschild_Radius_of_the_observable_universe [wikipedia.org]

    Bottom line is, black holes probably exist. We can actually see things that behave like black holes. But we have no idea what is beyond the event horizon (ie. physics, as we know it, kind of breaks down there) so we should not be making assumptions here like in the article. We also only have guesses what is happening at larger scales in the universe, but at least we have some observations there and educated guesses like Dark Matter.

    More research needed here and many lifetimes to accomplish it.

    • (Score: 4, Interesting) by Unixnut on Sunday May 12, @12:14PM

      by Unixnut (5779) on Sunday May 12, @12:14PM (#1356648)

      I remember watching a UK science documentary years ago where they postulated that black holes could be points where new universes were created. So inside the black hole was a new "big bang" with a whole new universe in it, each with different parameters. At some point when the "parent" black hole dissipates the new universe is completely disconnected from its parent universe and becomes fully standalone.

      The logic therein was that if this is happening in our universe, then in theory our entire universe is the product of a black hole in another universe. Which then postulated the existence of a "multiverse", from which sprouted concept such as string and membrane theory, as well wondering if dark matter and dark energy were somehow connected to this.

      Still, this area is very much active research, and there is no certainty of what the "correct" answer is, and who knows if we will ever be able to discover it fully. It is hard to deduce what is going on if you are unable to observe it.

    • (Score: 2) by HiThere on Sunday May 12, @01:17PM

      by HiThere (866) Subscriber Badge on Sunday May 12, @01:17PM (#1356653) Journal

      I've been assured by people who at least apparently ought to know that this doesn't work. I've never understood the explanations as to why not.

      --
      Javascript is what you use to allow unknown third parties to run software you have no idea about on your computer.
  • (Score: 2) by Mojibake Tengu on Sunday May 12, @08:05AM (2 children)

    by Mojibake Tengu (8598) on Sunday May 12, @08:05AM (#1356631) Journal

    How the 'gravity' escapes the black hole?

    I am asking, because one can encode information with pure gravity: by putting some gravitating items next to each other. Just like the magician does on his table.
    Can this 'gravity' escape the Universe too?

    --
    Respect Authorities. Know your social status. Woke responsibly.
    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by mhajicek on Sunday May 12, @08:51AM

      by mhajicek (51) on Sunday May 12, @08:51AM (#1356634)

      As I understand it, gravity doesn't escape a black hole. The gravity pauses as the mass meets the event horizon, so gravitationally it's like all the mass is a spherical shell right at the event horizon.

      --
      The spacelike surfaces of time foliations can have a cusp at the surface of discontinuity. - P. Hajicek
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by c0lo on Sunday May 12, @01:58PM

      by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Sunday May 12, @01:58PM (#1356659) Journal

      How the 'gravity' escapes the black hole?

      In relativity theory, it doesn't escape, it is the very cause of the blackhole - the latter being an extremely curved spacetime.
      Sabine explains: How does gravity escape a black hole? [youtube.com]

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by darkfeline on Sunday May 12, @08:37AM (4 children)

    by darkfeline (1030) on Sunday May 12, @08:37AM (#1356633) Homepage

    All I experienced was a miserable dozen minutes wading through ads trying to find the supposed video in question.

    Instead, I recommend playing Outer Wilds, which allows you to experience the same thing, many times. If you are especially unskilled at platforming in space, you may even go through all five stages of grief on your 30th+ journey into the black hole:

    "No way is that"

    "Fuck I missed that jump"

    "Cmon I totally made that jump"

    "I'm never going to get past this"

    "This is fine"

    --
    Join the SDF Public Access UNIX System today!
    • (Score: 4, Informative) by Runaway1956 on Sunday May 12, @09:25AM (1 child)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Sunday May 12, @09:25AM (#1356636) Journal

      I presume that your advertising was served up by Youtube? The links provided go to Youtube, of course. You might want to try this site instead. https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/14576 [nasa.gov] Nasa hosts several videos on that page, all related to the black hole video. Enjoy.

      If you wish to stop advertising on Youtube, please check out uBlock Origin. https://ublockorigin.com/ [ublockorigin.com] It will take you a few minutes to set it up, but it's well worth the trouble. Default install doesn't quite do the trick, you need to enable several block lists to get the most out of uBlock. While I have other ad blockers as well, I credit uBlock Origin with keeping Youtube under control.

      • (Score: 3, Touché) by HiThere on Sunday May 12, @01:19PM

        by HiThere (866) Subscriber Badge on Sunday May 12, @01:19PM (#1356654) Journal

        The more honorable way to block advertising from YouTube is to just stop using it.

        --
        Javascript is what you use to allow unknown third parties to run software you have no idea about on your computer.
    • (Score: 2) by maxwell demon on Sunday May 12, @09:31AM

      by maxwell demon (1608) on Sunday May 12, @09:31AM (#1356637) Journal

      Well, then I was fortunate to only experience a long list of sites and no hint on what I have to enable to see the video. After enabling a few sites without success, I gave up.

      --
      The Tao of math: The numbers you can count are not the real numbers.
    • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Monday May 13, @02:23PM

      by Freeman (732) on Monday May 13, @02:23PM (#1356816) Journal

      The Outer Worlds and Outer Wilds both released somewhat close together and I keep getting the two mixed up. Upon your recounting of the platforming horror, I thought I'd made a serious mistake. I did, I mistakenly got the titles confused again. I have "The Outer Worlds" in my library, not "Outer Wilds". To be honest, I've been over the Platforming genre for an extremely long time. You could say games like "Terraria" and "Starbound" have platforming elements, but they are generally "not platformers". Starbound does have some platforming challenges, but they're generally easy enough (and short enough) that you don't feel like cursing at the developers.

      --
      Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
  • (Score: 2) by KritonK on Sunday May 12, @09:00AM

    by KritonK (465) on Sunday May 12, @09:00AM (#1356635)

    No information was harmed in the posting of this article.

    Perhaps not in the actual posting, but, according to the video, information was mercilessly processed for five days on a NASA supercomputer, the equivalent of a decade of processing on a modern laptop.

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