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posted by martyb on Monday March 29 2021, @02:39PM   Printer-friendly

[Updated 2021-03-29 19:40:51 UTC] Ed. note: At the time of originally writing this story, the only information I could find on the ship's freeing was from directly watching it happen in real time. As originally reported here, that was on VesselFinder.com. There had been some reports last night of Ever Given having been freed, but those were later retracted. News reports were, therefore, suspect. The ship was still stuck. But then I was able to see it underway! I was also monitoring our news feeds and failed to find any reports concurrent with the apparent time of the ship's freeing. Again, the only certain information I had was watching it unfold online. In the interest of getting this breaking news to the community, accurately, and as quickly as possible, I could only refer the information I had at hand.

I'd read discussions elsewhere suggesting various approaches for freeing the ship, none of which held up to closer scrutiny. It's not just a matter of "pull harder!" The structural integrity of the ship was in question. A ship of that size undergoing an abrupt stop due to impact had the distinct possibility of breaking open and sinking. That would make the situation much, much worse. That it did no happen immediately was fortuitous. It was very much possible that a hasty attempt to free it could break it apart and sink it. That would make things much worse. Careful planning was required. Hence, the inclusion of a memorable example of Smit Salvage's successful raising of the Kursk. They knew what they were doing. Anything we could come up with was certainly already considered.

[Update 2] It's a few hours later and I'm finally seeing reports in the regular media that contains more detail. Take a look at Ship stuck in Suez Canal is freed: Everything you need to know. Sadly, even that lacks the details that I want to see. Just how did they get it free? How much and what kinds of equipment did they use? What process did they follow? What ideas did they consider and then reject, and why? If you come upon these kinds of details, please post them to the comments! --martyb

The original story appears below.

According to real-time updates, the container ship "Ever Given" has now been freed and is under way:

You can follow its progress at VesselFinder.com. (The web site seems to be struggling under the load.) At the moment of this writing, it is heading on a Course of 349.2° (nearly due north) at a speed of 2.3 knots.

It is headed to Great Bitter Lake. Once there and out of the path of other shipping, it will undergo technical inspections.

According to various reports, the Suez Canal carries anywhere from 10-15% of the world's shipping. The effort to dislodge the ship is led by Smit Salvage who is renowned in the ship salvage industry. They successfully took on the task of raising the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk. Powered by two nuclear reactors, it sank August 14, 2000 while a full complement of torpedoes and missiles.

What Next?
How will the backlog of hundreds of ships be prioritized for passage? That backlog is clearly visible from space. The canal's capacity is on the order of 55 ships per day. Will they take each ship first-come first-served? What about perishable and time-sensitive cargo? Take advantage of supply and demand to set up a bidding war? With the whole world watching and second guessing every decision, what should they do?

Previously:
Grounded 'Mega Ship' Blocking Suez Canal in Both Directions -- How Would You Get It Free?


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 3, Funny) by DannyB on Monday March 29 2021, @02:40PM

    by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 29 2021, @02:40PM (#1130763) Journal

    Nobody ever listen to Zathrus.

    --
    I get constant rejection even though the compiler is supposed to accept constants.
  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by DannyB on Monday March 29 2021, @02:43PM

    by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 29 2021, @02:43PM (#1130764) Journal

    Weeks sooner than some earlier predictions. Maybe there won't be another shortage of TP again after all.

    --
    I get constant rejection even though the compiler is supposed to accept constants.
  • (Score: 4, Touché) by c0lo on Monday March 29 2021, @03:02PM (9 children)

    by c0lo (156) on Monday March 29 2021, @03:02PM (#1130769) Journal

    How will the backlog of hundreds of ships be prioritized for passage?

    Who cares?
    Where's the story what have they done to free the ship? What were the difficulties they faced and how they managed to overcome them?
    There's more story about the unrelated "Russian nuclear submarine Kursk" than for this one.

    For those equally disappointed, some details here [theguardian.com]. Please contribute if you find others.

    Video appeared to show [twitter.com] the ship floating in the canal. At the scene, tugboats could be heard sounding their horns in celebration.

    The news came after Egyptian authorities said on Sunday that high tides and the arrival of extra tug boats could finally free the stricken ship as the crisis entered its seventh day.

    Salvage attempts were paused on Sunday to wait for extra tugs to arrive and while more excavation and dredging was carried out under the ship.

    According to Reuters, two sources at the SCA earlier said that a mass of rock had been found at the bow of the ship. That appeared to be confirmed by the focus late on Sunday on digging to remove the lining of the canal around the bow, which ploughed into the bank when the ship veered out of control.

    Diggers had been working to remove parts of the canal’s bank and expand dredging close to the ship’s bow to a depth of 18 metres (59ft), the SCA said in a statement.

    Suez Canal Authority (SCA) chief Osama Rabie told an Egyptian news channel the ship had moved from side to side for the first time late on Saturday.

    “It is a good sign,” he said, adding that 14 tugboats were deployed around the vessel and salvage crews were working round the clock.

    --
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
    • (Score: 4, Interesting) by c0lo on Monday March 29 2021, @03:15PM

      by c0lo (156) on Monday March 29 2021, @03:15PM (#1130773) Journal

      The ship was traveling at 13.5 knots before it ran aground... [businessinsider.com]

      Suez Canal speed limit was between 7.6 knots and 8.6 knots...

      ...two canal pilots were onboard when the ship hit land.
      ...
      The Ever Given didn’t have a tugboat escort through the canal...
      ...
      One ship captain unaffiliated with the grounding spoke with Bloomberg. Chris Cillard, the captain, told the outlet ships sometimes speed up as a way to better control their vessels during wind storms. “Speeding up to a certain point is effective,” he said.

      He added: “More than that and it becomes counter-effective because the bow will get sucked down deep into the water. Then, adding too much power does nothing but exacerbate the problem.”

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by c0lo on Monday March 29 2021, @03:27PM

      by c0lo (156) on Monday March 29 2021, @03:27PM (#1130775) Journal

      They passed through a stage (Mar 29, 2021) in which they rotated the ship, but the bow was still stuck "rock solid" in the bank [twitter.com]. At that stage, they still didn't know if unloading some of the cargo won't be necessary

      URGENT: The bow of the Ever Given is still stuck “rock solid” and the movement achieved in the stern this morning was “the easiest part,” the CEO of a salvage company working to free the ship told Dutch radio this morning.

      “We have seen many celebratory messages over the past week, but I will stick to the facts,” Peter Berdowski of Boskalis (SMIT salvage) told @NPORadio1 on Monday morning.

      “The facts are that it has indeed rotated. But the bow is still strongly stuck in the clay.”

      He said that it may still be necessary to remove containers from the Ever Given’s bow.

      “The fact that it has rotated – yeah, that is actually the easiest part,” he said.

      “But the bow is still stuck rock solid at the moment in the slightly sandy clay.”

      Moving it away from the canal bank, in which they will be less able to take advantage of the leverage on ship’s stern, will still be the difficult part, he said.

      If the 2nd heavy tugboat fails, they will direct water underneath the bow using the dredging equipment.

      “If that does not work, then you will need to unload. And that is only possible by removing containers from the bow.”

      Boskalis has developed a plan to move containers from the Ever Given to smaller ship docked alongside, he said.

      “But yes, you are going dozens of meters in the air with a crane to lift those containers, with a strong wind. That’s not the same as containers here in the quay in Rotterdam.”

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
    • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Monday March 29 2021, @04:10PM (6 children)

      by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Monday March 29 2021, @04:10PM (#1130793) Homepage
      > Where's the story what have they done to free the ship?

      They dug.
      With diggers.
      Lots.

      There you go, 3 sentences - that's more than the number devoted to the Kursk, just to keep you happy.
      --
      Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
      • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Monday March 29 2021, @04:24PM (2 children)

        by c0lo (156) on Monday March 29 2021, @04:24PM (#1130800) Journal

        They dug.

        How deep? What did they found?

        With diggers.

        No dredgers? That's stupid.

        Lots.

        Ah, you mean, when they build the canal?
        Otherwise, how did they fit that many around a single ship bow? Are diggers compressible or what?

        There you go, 3 sentences - that's more than the number devoted to the Kursk, just to keep you happy.

        Your short interjection into the story brought a nothingburger, but thank you for keeping it short.

        --
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
        • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Monday March 29 2021, @04:37PM (1 child)

          by FatPhil (863) <pc-soylentNO@SPAMasdf.fi> on Monday March 29 2021, @04:37PM (#1130809) Homepage
          No, they dug lots. From the photos, it seemed that there was only one active digger. Digging lots. Dredger came later only later, it seems.
          --
          Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
          • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Monday March 29 2021, @04:47PM

            by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 29 2021, @04:47PM (#1130818) Homepage Journal

            I had a page loaded with a short video that showed 4 trackhoes in one frame, then 4 trackhoes in another frame. It looked like there were two quite large and one medium large (the one in the first photos) trackhoes actually digging right up against the ship, then there were two other trackhoes moving that dug material further back from the bank. At no point were all five trackhoes captured in the same frame, but I think there were five total.

            As for dredgers, I think there were three of them working close to the bow. It's not as clear what purpose each boat has in the pictures.

            --
            "no more than 8 bullets in a round" - Joe Biden
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @05:31PM (2 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @05:31PM (#1130846)
        I was wondering since it's a canal can't they use stuff that's anchored to the ground to pull at the ship instead of tugboats?
        • (Score: 2) by RS3 on Monday March 29 2021, @05:48PM (1 child)

          by RS3 (6367) on Monday March 29 2021, @05:48PM (#1130858)

          The "ground" is mostly sand, so nothing is very well anchored. And even for something that's well anchored, maybe to bedrock, that ship is huge- the tugboats are the right thing to use.

          Thinking about it, and I'm not a civil engineer, but it's probably worth looking into building some kind of large well-anchored pulling stations for just this kind of problem.

          Anyone know: have they been lax about dredging the Suez Canal?

          • (Score: 3, Informative) by Runaway1956 on Monday March 29 2021, @07:47PM

            by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 29 2021, @07:47PM (#1130889) Homepage Journal

            Anyone know: have they been lax about dredging the Suez Canal?

            I want to say that's a funny question. I'll have to put it into context to get the humor across, don't mean to be a smartass exactly. The Ever Given is part of Evergreen's Golden class of container ships. They are the largest in the world. Her draught is listed at 15.7 meters, or about 16 yards, or about 50 feet. If the dredging in the canal has been lax, the Ever Given would be among the first ships to get mired in the bottom. Her sister ship, Ever Globe, is soon to be the third ship out of the canal going southbound.

            If fact, they have apparently been working hard to widen and deepen the canal, as well as building an alternative route on the nothern section. I see no laxness. ;^)

            BTW, the YM Wish has exited the confines of the canal, and is heading south into the Red Sea as I type. That is one heck of a traffic jam to navigate through!

            --
            "no more than 8 bullets in a round" - Joe Biden
  • (Score: 2, Funny) by Tork on Monday March 29 2021, @03:52PM

    by Tork (3914) on Monday March 29 2021, @03:52PM (#1130784)
    I can't believe it took this long for IR to get Thunderbird 2 out there.
    --
    Slashdolt Logic: "24 year old jokes about sharks and lasers are +5, Funny." 💩
  • (Score: 3, Informative) by Runaway1956 on Monday March 29 2021, @04:39PM (3 children)

    by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 29 2021, @04:39PM (#1130811) Homepage Journal

    https://www.vesselfinder.com/?imo=9684641 [vesselfinder.com]

    Ever Given is now near the middle of Great Bitter Lake. She has been met and passed by YM Wish, Maersk Esmeraldas, and is currently meeting Ever Globe. All three of those ships appear to be southbound into the southern part of the canal. At this point, no ships appear to be entering the canal from either the north, or the south. The plan seems to be to clear the lake of all shipping before allowing anyone to enter.

    It is NOT clear where the Ever Given is going, or where she might anchor for the "technical inspection" planned for her. To my knowledge, there are no piers or wharfs on the lake that might accomodate her.

    --
    "no more than 8 bullets in a round" - Joe Biden
    • (Score: 2) by Immerman on Monday March 29 2021, @05:15PM

      by Immerman (3985) on Monday March 29 2021, @05:15PM (#1130839)

      Do they need a pier or warf? What does that contribute to the process? It's not like they'd be dry-docking the sucker - it's all going to done either internally or by divers anyway, and the lake offers water calmer than any pier in a sheltered bay. Probably no big deal to just transport the necessary people and equipment to the ship where it floats. Probably a bit more expensive that way, but nothing compared to the cost of losing ship and cargo at sea.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @05:33PM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @05:33PM (#1130848)
      Why are you linking to the wrong ship?
  • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @04:39PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @04:39PM (#1130812)

    https://archive.org/download/TerryADavis_TempleOS_Archive/videos/2017/2017-07-12T04:47:05+00:00%20-%2008JewishPig.MP4 [archive.org]

    * TPTB want you to forget about TempleOS and the idea of "do it yourself" software, unless of course it's software THEY control! And the idea of "no networking" is peace of mind in the times of Internet of Things and everything connecting to the beast, I mean internet. Men in high and low places harassed this man and may have intentionally led to his death, in my opinion.

    -------

    Terry A. Davis: The Movie!

    T e r r y * D a v i s:

        His body was recovered following a brutal attack by a clandestine intelligence agency involving a train. Refitted with cyborg like electronics, his new organs grant him a new life and a new friendship. No longer pounding the streets in homelessness, Terry Davis now works with the underground vigilante group AGT (Anti Glow Team). Through it all Terry erects an electronic temple, but can he control the power he has programmed into existence?

    Rated MA for mature (brief nudity, alcohol, drugs, extreme violence and language)

  • (Score: 2) by Immerman on Monday March 29 2021, @05:10PM (13 children)

    by Immerman (3985) on Monday March 29 2021, @05:10PM (#1130837)

    It's a sea level canal with no locks imposing mechanical limits, so what exactly determines the capacity limit?

    Sounds like the speed limit is 9 knots (16.7km/h), or about 12 hours to fully traverse the 193km canal. 55 ships per day, assuming a 50-50 split each direction, means an average distance of 7km between ships going the same direction. Presumably that low density is mostly to reduce the risks when passing ships going the other direction - assuming equal spacing you'd be squeezing past a ship going the other way every 13 minutes... so lets eliminate that problem.

    Open the canal in one direction only, and lower the average distance between ships to 1 km. 12 hours for the first ship to get through, followed by another ship every 3.6 minutes. In 24 hours you can get 200 ships through, with another 200 every 12 additional hours. Once the backlog is cleared up, open the canal in the other direction only for a similar period. In just a few days the backlog is virtually eliminated in both directions, maybe things are unusually busy for a few more days as the "new backlog" works its way through, and then things return to normal.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by Runaway1956 on Monday March 29 2021, @05:49PM (6 children)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 29 2021, @05:49PM (#1130859) Homepage Journal

      I don't know the details how they plan things, but you don't have ships meeting in the canal. The south and the north channels open, allowing inbound ships to come as far as Great Bitter Lake. At the lake, ships anchor, awaiting permission to proceed. No southbound traffic leaves the lake until the southern stretch is cleared of shipping, and likewise or the northern stretch. Everyone sits peacefully at anchor, until the canal authority grants permission to resume movement.

      Your idea of opening the canal to only north or only south bound traffic for 24 hours sounds good to me. There would be no need to stop and anchor, so traffic would flow smoothly for a whole day. There may be a couple devils hidden in the details, and those devils probably call themselves "managers".

      --
      "no more than 8 bullets in a round" - Joe Biden
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @05:57PM (4 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @05:57PM (#1130862)

        The main issue with that is that they may not have enough pilots to do that. It's like shipping containers, they could send a bunch of ships one way, but then you'd have a bunch of containers on one side and no way of loading all the ships.

        • (Score: 2) by Immerman on Monday March 29 2021, @08:09PM (3 children)

          by Immerman (3985) on Monday March 29 2021, @08:09PM (#1130897)

          I think it's a safe bet that all the ships have their own pilots. Probably at least two in fact, since even pilots need to sleep, and somebody still needs to steer. The canal is just a short stretch in a long journey, and all the ships are traveling pretty continuously with just brief stops to load and unload. at the stops.

          • (Score: 4, Informative) by drussell on Monday March 29 2021, @10:11PM (2 children)

            by drussell (2678) Subscriber Badge on Monday March 29 2021, @10:11PM (#1130936) Journal

            No...

            When you enter some congested waterways, ports, etc. you take on board a local pilot that guides the ship in the local specialized area.

            This has nothing to do with the regular crew of the vessel.

            • (Score: 2) by Immerman on Tuesday March 30 2021, @01:21AM

              by Immerman (3985) on Tuesday March 30 2021, @01:21AM (#1131021)

              Ah, okay

            • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Tuesday March 30 2021, @04:17PM

              by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 30 2021, @04:17PM (#1131251) Homepage Journal

              Pilots. You're correct, in all restricted waterways, ships are required to take one or more pilots onboard. The duties and responsibilities of pilots is somewhat different from on place to another, but they never assume any liability. Nor do the various port authorities, canal authorities, their governments, nor the companies/corporations supplying pilots ever take on any liability. They've all got ironclad legal networks and contracts that avoid liability.

              Always, the ship's captain or master is liable for everything, no matter what. If he sits like an attentive little dog, and echoes every suggestion that a pilot makes, he is still responsible. The pilot can only make suggestions, it is the captain who orders his own crew to speed up, slow down, hold a course, or whatever.

              https://cultofsea.com/navigation/master-pilot-exchange-duties-responsibilities-and-elements-of-effective-relationship/ [cultofsea.com]

              --
              "no more than 8 bullets in a round" - Joe Biden
      • (Score: 2) by Immerman on Monday March 29 2021, @08:05PM

        by Immerman (3985) on Monday March 29 2021, @08:05PM (#1130896)

        I wondered about that, I figured they were either going both ways or piling up in the lake. It's not a very big lake, all things considered, and a long way from the optimal point at the center of the canal, but if you're only dealing with a few dozen ships a day I guess it's good enough.

    • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @05:53PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @05:53PM (#1130861)

      Presumably the number of available pilots and spacing concerns are the biggest factors. They presumably have a relatively fixed number of pilots to handle the ships going through and they have to reposition back and forth to have ones available for incoming ships.

    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @06:13PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @06:13PM (#1130871)

      For ships that big 1km is too close. If there had been another ship that size 1km behind it, it would have hit the EG when it ran aground. They are 400m long. It would be like maintaining 2 car length separation on icy roads. One hiccup and it's a pile-up.

      Even 2 or 3 would be too close, any speed variation and you'll get traffic bunching up. The basic idea is ok, but give them 3km and increase the speed to exactly 12 knots for everyone.

    • (Score: 4, Insightful) by VLM on Monday March 29 2021, @06:29PM (2 children)

      by VLM (445) on Monday March 29 2021, @06:29PM (#1130880)

      Best case you could double the speed. Remember its a long canal with long stretches between passing zones so you can't go faster than the slowest ship. Which has an interesting sorting solution where the guy most excited to move his frozen yak meat the fastest will simply go first and floor it. But "lots of" cargo ships can't get much above 25 knots regardless how much they floor it.

      I have no experience with this canal. Typical freshwater canals might have freeboard like half a meter. So you should not make a habit of making a bow wave over half a meter tall. Bow wave height generally goes up around square of boat speed at low speeds until a max is reached. Is ten knots max bow wave height for a containership? Not sure... You shouldn't slush seawater over the walls every day, but once in awhile must be OK?

      "About ten knots" is about 5 m/s because you get about two m/s per knot. I know for a fact the canal can't be dirt or grass lined because drainage ditches can't sustain over a m/s water flow permanently and they're running over four times that speed on a regular basis. So its lined with "something".

      I found some army corps of engineers theoretical papers claiming erosion depends mostly on bow wave power which would depend roughly on square of speed. So doubling ship speed would long term quadruple erosion. So its fine for a "once in a lifetime accident" but given the enormous cost of maintenance the long term speed should probably remain about ten knots.

      Note that the faster the ships go the more shit will be stirred up from the bottom and into the cooling systems so your next problem is you got a train of ten ships going 25 knots and the engine in ship 3 clogs up and burns out and now you got two ships home free and seven ships stuck behind the dude with the burned out engine...

      • (Score: 2) by Immerman on Monday March 29 2021, @08:14PM (1 child)

        by Immerman (3985) on Monday March 29 2021, @08:14PM (#1130898)

        I didn't suggest changing the speed at all, just the traffic density. And apparently the canal speed limit is 9 knots, so I suspect pretty much everyone will be able to manage that without problems.

        You could go faster - I initially suggested it (but did not actually post) before dancing that just one-way would do the job a lot more safely.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 30 2021, @06:34AM

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 30 2021, @06:34AM (#1131094)

          You need forward speed to maintain steering. That seems to be part of what got it so stuck, they had increased speed to over 13 knots to counteract the wind and it wasn't enough, so when they hit the wall they dug right in.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by sjames on Tuesday March 30 2021, @12:51AM

      by sjames (2882) on Tuesday March 30 2021, @12:51AM (#1131011) Journal

      They can't decrease the spacing safely. If you think a stuck cargo ship was a problem, wait till you see a 7 ship pile-up.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @06:17PM (5 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @06:17PM (#1130874)

    Now that al-Qaeda, the CIA, and other terrorist organizations know that the Suez Canal is so easily blocked, it's only a matter of time before they build a boat and block it themselves.

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by takyon on Monday March 29 2021, @06:26PM

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Monday March 29 2021, @06:26PM (#1130878) Journal

      Suez Crisis Will Become Unstuck. The Real Security Crisis Will Remain. [bloomberg.com] (archive [archive.is])

      The current blockage apparently arose from adverse weather conditions. But no one should underestimate the geostrategic warning it sends about the potential for political sabotage. As nature inspires art, so too does it inspire malevolence. This is not merely about geography, but also about today’s broader political risks to world commerce, ranging from one errant ship at Suez to confronting China’s enormous political, military and economic challenge.

      Indisputably, political risks are now rising from sources not previously perceived. The coronavirus pandemic, for one, has alerted terrorist groups, rogue states and major powers alike that biological (and chemical) weapons have far more coercive power than once recognized. Such weapons are comparatively easier to make than nuclear devices.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
    • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @06:37PM (2 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @06:37PM (#1130882)

      Imagine a shipping container filled with... fuck it, you do the creative thinking. I'm just a code monkey.

      • (Score: 1) by Ethanol-fueled on Tuesday March 30 2021, @12:09AM (1 child)

        by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Tuesday March 30 2021, @12:09AM (#1130996) Homepage

        Some combination of organs, live trafficked humans, and nukes; all destined to some combination of Israel, Syria, Ukraine, and possibly Turkey.

        Remember, there's some shit going down in Ukraine. All the Bidens' criminality all goes back to Ukraine. Certainly Western nations would like to sneak some weapons in there. Something smells fishy, and it is no Cohencidence that MH17 was shot down over Ukraine. Perhaps there is evidence floating around somewhere that the shootdown of MH17 was premeditated. If the Jews can do 9/11, they can certainly down airliners.

        • (Score: 2) by kazzie on Tuesday March 30 2021, @12:05PM

          by kazzie (5309) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 30 2021, @12:05PM (#1131160)

          Yep, that's creative thinking.

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by Thexalon on Monday March 29 2021, @07:53PM

      by Thexalon (636) on Monday March 29 2021, @07:53PM (#1130891)

      This wouldn't be a new strategy: Egypt blocked the Suez Canal in 1956 [wikipedia.org] on purpose as part of a fairly serious fight between the recently-independent Egypt and the British, French, and Israelis. If you're looking for an alternate history break-from-reality point, Dwight Eisenhower choosing to back the invasion force rather than opposing it diplomatically like he did would be an interesting place.

      And before that, there was significant fighting over control of the Suez Canal in both WWI and WWII that could easily have led to it being blocked by one side or the other.

      --
      The only thing that stops a bad guy with a compiler is a good guy with a compiler.
  • (Score: 2) by AnonTechie on Monday March 29 2021, @08:54PM

    by AnonTechie (2275) on Monday March 29 2021, @08:54PM (#1130908) Journal

    Maybe, this gives a better explanation of the re-floating process:

    How the Giant Boat Blocking the Suez Canal Was Freed: Dredgers, Tugboats, and a Full Moon [time.com]

    --
    Albert Einstein - "Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."
  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @10:38PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 29 2021, @10:38PM (#1130951)

    For all the speculators, here is some good info and perspective:

    Text-only lite version:
    What it's really like steering the world's biggest ships [cnn.com]

    Full interactive version:
    What it's really like steering the world's biggest ships [cnn.com]

    ...[a ship] can't proceed until at least one pilot representing the Suez Canal Authority comes on board. "They have expertise in transiting through the Suez Canal," explains Gupta. "This pilot has to be on board the vessel and he navigates the vessel. He basically assists the captain."

    ...cruise ships usually get priority because of their numbers of passengers and because they are working within tight timeframes. This is the case not just in the Suez, but in other waterways

  • (Score: 2) by sonamchauhan on Monday March 29 2021, @11:19PM

    by sonamchauhan (6546) on Monday March 29 2021, @11:19PM (#1130966)

    > What ideas did they consider and then reject, and why?

    A couple of mechas... One at each end

    Rejected - no power source

  • (Score: 2) by crafoo on Tuesday March 30 2021, @04:35AM

    by crafoo (6639) on Tuesday March 30 2021, @04:35AM (#1131072)

    time to sell energy ETFs

  • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Tuesday March 30 2021, @04:00PM

    by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday March 30 2021, @04:00PM (#1131243) Homepage Journal

    Seems this has become a history story now, traffic flow appears normal, if heavy now. All day yesterday, when I looked, I saw no northbound traffic through the canal. For whatever reason, everything flowed south, stopped for awhile, then flowed south some more.

    This morning, Great Bitter Lake is crowded with ships, and traffic is flowing south out of the lake, as well as north out of the lake. This is the sort of traffic flow I expect from my own limited experience. When the lake is near empty of ships, traffic will flow inward from both north and south again.

    Ever Given still sits at anchor in the north-east quadrant of the lake, and probably won't move until A: she is deemed seaworthy, and B: every government, corporation, man, woman, and their pet dogs who suffered losses during this fiasco has been bought off.

    --
    "no more than 8 bullets in a round" - Joe Biden
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