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posted by takyon on Wednesday January 27 2016, @11:00AM   Printer-friendly
from the i-fought-the-law-and... dept.

Previously: Militia Occupies Federal Building in Oregon After Rancher Arson Convictions

Russia Today reports:

Ammon Bundy, the leader of the armed group occupying a federal wildlife refuge near Burns, Oregon, and four others have been arrested by law enforcement amid gunfire, according to the FBI.

At 4:25 pm on [January 26], the FBI and Oregon State Police "began an enforcement action to bring into custody a number of individuals associated with the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. During that arrest, there were shots fired", the Bureau said in a statement.

The FBI said one person who was "a subject of a federal probable cause arrest is deceased". He said they are not releasing any information on the person "pending identification by the medical examiner's office".

One person suffered non-life threatening injuries and was taken to a local hospital for treatment. He was arrested and is in custody.

The arrested individuals include:
- Ammon Edward Bundy, age 40, of Emmett, Idaho.
- Ryan C. Bundy, age 43, of Bunkerville, Nevada.
- Brian Cavalier, age 44, of Bunkerville, Nevada.
- Shawna Cox, age 59, of Kanab, Utah.
- Ryan Waylen Payne, age 32, of Anaconda, Montana.

CNN, NYT, Washington Post, BBC, OregonLive.


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  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @03:08PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @03:08PM (#295325)

    Wait, what?

    This story is too political for you? All those shit-stirring stories from buzzard didn't make a dent but this one about an obscure group of dummies camping in the wilderness to support people who didn't even want their support is a problem? As current events stories goes this one is pretty damn blah. If that guy hadn't wanted to die (he literally said he preferred to die than be arrested [msnbc.com] on camera) this wouldn't even be a story.

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  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Phoenix666 on Wednesday January 27 2016, @04:17PM

    by Phoenix666 (552) on Wednesday January 27 2016, @04:17PM (#295376) Journal

    There's another point to be made about stories like this. Most of the time they are irrelevant, but sometimes they are incredibly relevant and lead to huge things. Only, it's not easy to know that except in hindsight. If we only ever paid attention to official versions of which things matter, we'd miss the importance of a fruit vendor [washingtonpost.com] setting himself on fire or the assassination of a distant, unknown nobleman [wikipedia.org] by a student, or a traffic stop [wikipedia.org].

    History-making events don't always arrive in the guise you expect.

    --
    Washington DC delenda est.
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @05:04PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @05:04PM (#295406)

      Nope.

      There are literally billions of random irrelevant events every single day. The one time some random event is part of a major chain reaction doesn't justifying calling attention to every other irrelevant event.

      The spark that lights the fire is no more important than any other spark. What is important are the combustible conditions that made it so a spark could ignite a forest fire. Stories like this are all about sparks with practically nothing about the context.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @08:37PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @08:37PM (#295537)

        Tell that to the forest.

        • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @09:16PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @09:16PM (#295566)

          If that forest didn't want to catch fire, it should have kept hydrated.

          The arab spring didn't happen because one street vendor suicided. It happened because the entire region had reached a breaking point. You want to look at the straw that broke the camel's back, I want to look at the camel because a straw is just a straw.

          • (Score: 2) by Phoenix666 on Thursday January 28 2016, @03:16AM

            by Phoenix666 (552) on Thursday January 28 2016, @03:16AM (#295741) Journal

            because a straw is just a straw

            Until that straw falls in that place on that camel's back, it is. Then it's pivotal.

            Lots of people have been saying for years that the Middle East is a powder keg. I remember that exact phrase used to describe the region in my first social studies textbook in grade school. But the state of being a powder keg doesn't mean a whole lot if you take the lit match out of the picture.

            So, yes, one street vendor having committed suicide would not have touched off the Arab Spring without the long-pent up anger and frustration of millions of people suffering under autocratic regimes. But neither would that breaking point have been discovered or the wave of revolutions kicked off had that thing not happened at that place at that time.

            In this case, it's as plausible against the backdrop of deep discontent, no, anger, at the direction of the country for confrontations with the government like this one to touch off something larger. The murder of Michael Brown has touched off something much larger, which we all must concede no matter where we stand on that question. The original Occupy Wall Street protest touched off something much larger, too.

            --
            Washington DC delenda est.
    • (Score: 2) by dyingtolive on Wednesday January 27 2016, @07:36PM

      by dyingtolive (952) on Wednesday January 27 2016, @07:36PM (#295502)

      I tried making that argument once and was told that I was relying on "lottery logic".

      --
      Don't blame me, I voted for moose wang!
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @08:05PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @08:05PM (#295523)

        So you and phoenix both like to play the lottery.

        How's that working out for ya?

        • (Score: 2) by dyingtolive on Wednesday January 27 2016, @08:30PM

          by dyingtolive (952) on Wednesday January 27 2016, @08:30PM (#295534)

          You also fail to realize the difference in scope between someone else logging a potentially trivial (or not) event on a website, and someone betting personal finite resources in hopes it will provide disproportionately large payoff of the same type of resource, I see.

          --
          Don't blame me, I voted for moose wang!
          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @09:11PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday January 27 2016, @09:11PM (#295562)

            What? Buying a $2 lotto ticket consumes "personal finite resources" but the time consumed posting and discussing trivial events is not a finite personal resource? If anything the lotto ticket is the one with better odds - powerball has a 1 in 25 chance of hitting. [powerball.com]

            Sounds like your sense of scope has been warped by butthurt.

            • (Score: 2) by dyingtolive on Thursday January 28 2016, @01:06AM

              by dyingtolive (952) on Thursday January 28 2016, @01:06AM (#295692)

              Nope. You're still missing it.

              --
              Don't blame me, I voted for moose wang!