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Breaking News
posted by takyon on Sunday June 12 2016, @06:00PM   Printer-friendly

A suspected Islamic terrorist opened fire at a gay nightclub in Florida, killing 50 people and wounding another 53 before he was killed by police. While authorities continue to investigate to determine whether this man had ties to ISIS, the terror organization has not been quiet in praising the attack. This comes three days after ISIS announced they would attack somewhere in Florida. Today's attack marks the largest act of terrorism on US soil since 9/11.

takyon: The gunman reportedly called 911 emergency services to pledge allegiance to ISIS. The President will hold a briefing momentarily. Compare this article to the original submission.


Original Submission   Late submission by physicsmajor

 
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  • (Score: 2) by SecurityGuy on Monday June 13 2016, @12:53AM

    by SecurityGuy (1453) on Monday June 13 2016, @12:53AM (#359003)

    I'll take this one. I was raised Roman Catholic, though I've been nonpracticing and am growing more and more comfortable with atheism.

    There's no part of this that any part of the church I used to belong to would endorse. Killing people because they don't follow the rules of the RC church would be murder, and a first-class, do-not-pass Go ticket to hell. They do have this weird (to me) deal where you can be forgiven pretty much anything as long as you confess it (and really mean it, and really stop doing it), but seeing as this guy was killed in the act, my old church would say he's irrevocably in hell forever.

    Where do I stand? I don't think other people's sexuality is any of my concern unless they're a potential partner. I think many of the world's problems could be solved if we just left each other alone.

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  • (Score: 2) by quintessence on Monday June 13 2016, @02:14AM

    by quintessence (6227) on Monday June 13 2016, @02:14AM (#359066)

    Killing people because they don't follow the rules of the RC church would be murder

    Apparently you haven't heard of the Inquisition or the Crusades.

    Point being institutional change doesn't happen in a vacuum, and even for the long storied history of the Catholic Church, there are reformers, there are doubts as to how the Church should progress, and, most importantly, the Church can admit mistakes were made and change course.

    God may not be infallible, but perhaps our understanding is.

    I'll even give the Church credit: with the long history it has, the present Pope is about the best you could ask for in maintaining tradition with an eye towards social change.

    • (Score: 2) by SecurityGuy on Monday June 13 2016, @03:44AM

      by SecurityGuy (1453) on Monday June 13 2016, @03:44AM (#359113)

      Apparently you haven't heard of the Inquisition or the Crusades.

      I have. I was a big medieval history buff as a kid. The church I was part of in the 1900s didn't have inquisitions or crusades. They were a lot more about bake sales and the occasional carnival or bingo night.

      If you want to extend the question to "Was the Inquisition wrong? Were the Crusades wrong?" Yes and yes.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 13 2016, @07:52AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 13 2016, @07:52AM (#359237)

        The church I was part of in the 1900s didn't have inquisitions or crusades.
        They were a lot more about bake sales and the occasional carnival or bingo night.

        Don't forget protecting pedo-priests. Also there is the matter of complicity in the rwandan genocide. [theguardian.com]
        Neither of which the church has fully come to grips with yet.

        Anecdotally, my friend was forced to marry her rapist at the age of 18 in the phillipines, and she wasn't even from a poor family - she attended the most prestigious university in the country. (15 years later she was granted an annulment by the very same priest after her husband had cracked her head open and left her for dead in the street).

        I don't say that to bag on catholicism, but rather to point out that individuals can experience the same religious institution in wildly different ways.

        • (Score: 2) by SecurityGuy on Monday June 13 2016, @01:59PM

          by SecurityGuy (1453) on Monday June 13 2016, @01:59PM (#359356)

          Don't forget protecting pedo-priests.

          I haven't. That's why I left. I had kids and the fact that people knew that was happening and didn't stop it was a deal breaker.