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posted by mattie_p on Monday February 17 2014, @11:37PM   Printer-friendly
from the how-super-is-it dept.

romanr writes:

"Copper oxides, also known as cuprates, are the most promising materials for superconductivity. Today, cuprates can be superconductive at temperatures as high as -150 °C. But for many years scientists wondered why they lose superconductivity when concentration of electrons drops below certain level. Most scientist thought that the cuprates gradually became insulators.

Scientists from Université de Sherbrooke discovered that the loss of superconductivity is because of a sudden appearance of a distinct electronic phase in the material that enters into competition with the superconductivity and weakens it. It means, that higher temperature superconductors will be possible if we can get rid of the competing phase. This new approach opens a way to get an ambient temperature superconductivity."

 
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  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Khyber on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:14AM

    by Khyber (54) on Tuesday February 18 2014, @01:14AM (#1245) Journal

    This will lead to better performing LEDs and processors in the long run.

    I can't wait to find out how they manage to fix this. Probably involving making a crystalline lattice and then probably forcing this phase ripple into the same phase as the power flow. I'm not that good with this.

    --
    Destroying Semiconductors With Style Since 2008, and scaring you ill-educated fools since 2013.
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